THE
SPARKS QUARTERLY

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION

“He who careth not from whence he came, careth little whither he goeth.” Daniel Webster


 
VOL. XVI, NO. 3  SEPTEMBER, 1968
WHOLE NO. 63a

 
Index Next Page Previous Page Previous Whole No.

[Note: Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

 Mrs. Mary Tennessee Sparks Dowell (1874-1968)

at the age of twenty

(View photograph)

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THE SPARKS QUARTERLY, published by The Sparks Family Association.

Paul E. Sparks, President, 155 North Hite Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky (40206)
William P. Johnson, Historian-Genealogist, Box 531, Raleigh, North Carolina (27602)
Russell B. Bidlack, Secretary-Treasurer & Editor, 1709 Cherokee Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan (48104)
 

The Sparks Family Association was founded in March, 1953, as a non-profit organization devoted to the assembling and preserving of genealogical and historical materials pertaining to the Sparks family in America. Membership in the Association is open to all persons connected in any way with the Sparks family, whether by blood, marriage, or adoption, and to persons interested in genealogical and historical research. Membership falls into three classes: Active, Contributing, and Sustaining. Active membership dues are three dollars per year; Contributing membership dues are four dollars per year; and Sustaining membership dues are any amount over four dollars which the member wishes to contribute. All members, whether Active, Contributing, or Sustaining, receive THE SPARKS QUARTERLY as it is published in March, June, September, and December. Libraries, genealogical and historical associations, and individuals may subscribe to the QUARTERLY without joining the Association at the rate of three dollars per year. Back issues are kept in print and are available for seventy-five cents per issue. The first issue of the QUARTERLY was published in March, 1953. Three indexes have been published, the first covering the first five years of the QUARTERLY (1953-1957), the second covering the years 1958-1962, and the third covering 1963-1967. Each of these is available for $1.00. The editor of the QUARTERLY from March 1953 to September 1954 was Dr. Paul  E. Sparks; since September 1954 the editor has been Dr. Russell B. Bidlack. The QUARTERLY is printed at the Edwards Letter Shop, 711 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

MRS. MARY TENNESSEE SPARKS DOWELL, 1874-1968

A Tribute by Her Daughter, Lida

Mary Tennessee Sparks Dowell passed away on May 4, 1968, and was buried in the Spring Ridge Cemetery near Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, beside her husband, who had died seventeen years earlier.

“Little Merry” or “China Doll”, as she was affectionately called, was a descendant of Richard and Sarah (Peterson) Sparks. Richard Sparks, born in Virginia in 1781, was living in Rutherford County, North Carolina, in 1810, but by 1840 had moved with his family to Roane County, Tennessee, where he and his wife remained about ten years before moving to Carroll County, Arkansas, to be near their son, Joshua. Richard Sparks died between 1860 and 1870; Sarah died after 1870.

Mrs. Dowell’s grandfather, Peterson B. Sparks, was a son of Richard and Sarah (Peterson) Sparks and was born in 1806 in North Carolina; later he lived in Blount County, Tennessee, Jefferson County, Alabama, Pontotoc County, Mississippi, and Carroll County, Arkansas. (See the QUARTERLY for June, 1964, Whole No. 46, p. 811.) Mrs. Dowell’s parents were Robert T. and Jane H. Sparks and she was born at Gaither, Arkansas, on June 9, 1874. She had one brother named John Sparks who was killed in an accident about 1912.

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Mrs. Mary Tennessee Sparks Dowell, a Tribute (continued)

The heritage of pioneer hardiness coupled with hardships experienced while growing up on a small farm in a war-blighted area developed a fortitude in this petite girl that enabled her to overcome many seemingly unsurmountable problems in her life.

After she had completed the formal education offered by the schools of Gaither, her father, believing that a girl’s place was in the home, denied her pleas to attend boarding school. But being an avid reader, she amassed a storehouse of knowledge far beyond that of her contemporaries. She possessed a keen understanding of human nature and was always ready to sympathize with and encourage those in need.

On August 28, 1896, Mary Sparks and W. M. Dowell, a Peabody graduate, were married at Gaither, Arkansas. From that date on to her last day, she was indirectly connected with schools through her husband or children. Some early years were spent in Arkansas and Texas before moving to Louisiana. They left six living children who consider themselves highly privileged to have had such parents.

Life was far from easy rearing and educating six children principally on a teacher’s meager salary, but by wise planning and hard work, these parents lived to see their children become well-established, respected citizens.

[Note:  The lower half of page 1165 consists of a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

Mrs. Mary Tennessee Sparks Dowell (1874—1968)

 at the age of ninety—three

(View photograph)

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Mrs. Mary Tennessee Sparks Dowell, a Tribute (continued)

Mary’s sharp sense of humor, love of beauty, and her multi-talents added much enrichment to the family life. For her 88th birthday party, she designed an original pattern and then made the dress by it.

She was a devout Baptist and reared her children accordingly. During her later years she found much happiness in church activities and the frequent family reunions.

Someone said, “She loved people and people loved her.” This was evidenced by the many tributes paid her at her funeral. Her numerous interests kept her active and alert to the day she suffered the fatal stroke.

The children born to this union were:

1. Lida Dowell, born August 28, 1897; she married Harvey G. Phillips on July 29, 1923. They have a daughter, Dorothy R. Phillips, born June 25, 1925, in Opelousas, Louisiana.
2. James R. Dowell, now of Little Rock, Arkansas, was born December 30, 1898; he married Alpha Lou Thomas on January 9, 1923. They have a son, James R. Dowell of Atlanta, Georgia, born March 6, 1930, married Marilyn MoQuery. They have daughters named Karen, Tania, Cynthia, and Gail.
3. William Dowell, born March 27, 1901, died August 30, 1902.

4. Jewell Dowell, now of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, was born February 28, 1903.

5. Lewis Dowell, born May 5, 1906, died June 8, 1907.

6. Verna Dowell, born August 1, 1908; she married Dewitt Jackson on January 13, 1939, and now lives in Pleasant Hill, Louisiana. They have a daughter named Dianna Jackson.

7. Odessa Dowell, born September 14, 1912; she married Ernest D. Copeland on June 15, 1941, and lives in Mansfield, Louisiana.

8. Norma Dowell, born April 26, 1915; she married Bruce McCullough on July 2, 1937, and now lives in Mansfield, Louisiana. They have a daughter named Janell who married Edward R. Price and lives in Dallas, Texas; they have children named Edward III and Susan Janell. The McCulloughs also have two sons, Bruce Jr. and Thomas.

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ADDITIONAL NOTES ON THE DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC SPARKS

(1768—1834)

OF HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO

In the QUARTERLY of June 1962 (Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38, page 657) we published the will of Isaac Sparks (born 1768, died 1834) of Hamilton County, Ohio. Additional notes on Isaac Sparks appeared in the QUARTERLY of September 1966 (Vol. X, No. 3, Whole No. 55, pp. 1009-1010). In the QUARTERLY of March 1968, Vol. XVI, No. 1, Whole No. 61, pp. 1135-1142 (incorrectly numbered 1117- 1124) appeared an article on William Sparks (died 1788) of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, who was Isaac Sparks’s father.

In his will dated July 15, 1834, Isaac Sparks mentioned each of his nine children, one of whom he called “Nancy Cock, my fourth daughter,” to whom he left $220.00. Until recently we had only this one reference to Nancy, daughter of Isaac Sparks, but a few months ago a new member of the Association, Mrs. David Gibbs, was able to provide detailed information on Nancy (who was Mrs. Gibbs’ s great-great-grandmother).

Nancy Sparks, daughter of Isaac Sparks, was born in 1800, probably in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Her mother was Isaac’s first wife, Sarah (or Sally), whose tombstone still stands in the McCrea Cemetery at College Hill in Hamilton County, Ohio, on property now owned by the Pillar of Fire, a religious organization. According to her tombstone, “Sally Sparks, wife of Isaac Sparks, died December 17, 1825, in her 55th year.” Her maiden name was Sarah Hankins (or Hawkins). Isaac Sparks’s tombstone in the same cemetery gives his birth date as November 24, 1768, and his death date as August 21, 1834. Isaac Sparks brought his family to Springfield Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, sometime prior to the spring of 1818. He was a justice of the peace in Hamilton County from 1818 until 1820. One of his earliest acts as a justice of the peace was to judge a case in which Alexander Campbell brought suit against Robert William to pay a debt of six dollars and three shillings. This was the Alexander Campbell who, with his father, Thomas Campbell, Walter Scott and Barton W. Stone, founded the Disciples of Christ (Christian Church). Isaac Sparks was a convert to this church and was custodian of the “Ministerial Funds” for the Christian Church of Colerain Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, from 1822 to 1829. (Many of the records kept by Isaac Sparks are now in the possession of a great-great-grandson, Mr. Buell McCash, of Columbia, Missouri. A sketch recently located of the life of a grandson of Isaac Sparks contains the interesting statement that Isaac Sparks “swam the Ohio River at one time in order to escape from Indians.” (History of Miami County, Ohio, Chicago, Lewis Pub. Co., p. 580.)

Nancy Sparks, fourth daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Harikins) Sparks, was often called “Anna” as a nickname. She was married on November 2, 1820, in Hamilton County, Ohio, to Tunis Cock. The name Cock was often spelled Cox, and Tunis and his descendants adopted the “Cox” spelling. Tunis was a son of William G. Cock (or Cox), a stonemason who was born in New Jersey in 1778 and settled in Hamilton County, Ohio, in 1809. He died on October 9, 1860. Tunis Cox’s mother’s name was Mary; she died March 9, 1852. (See Henry A. Ford’s History of Hamilton County, Ohio, published in 1881, page 372.) Tunis Cox was nine years old when his father brought the family to Ohio. Following his marriage to Nancy Sparks, they lived for two years at North Bend Fort. They then “settled in Springfield near New Burlington, where he

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Additional Notes on the Descendants of Isaac Sparks (continued):

[Tunis Cox], kept the old Eleven-mile House, or Farmer’s Rest, on the Hamilton Pike, which was known as one of the best hotels of the county outside the city.” (See Ford’s History of Hamilton County, page 372.)

Tunis and Nancy (sparks) Cox were the parents of the following children:

1. William Cox, born October 7, 1821.
2. Thompson Cox, born November 29, 1822; married Susan Patterson in 1844.
3. Mary Ann Cox, born June 21, 1824; married Nicholas Goshorn (?)
4. Sally Cox, born December 6, 1825; married a Titus.
5. Gresham Cox, born March 18, 1827.
6. Andrew Jackson Cox, born February 6, 1829.
7. Elizabeth Cox, born December 12, 1830.
8. Isaac Cox, born March 17, 1832.
9. Martha Jane Cox, born September 1, 1834.
10. Harriet Cox, born January 8, 1836, died June 25, 1868; married Alexander Dom, Sr.
11. George Washington Cox, born December 27, 1837; married Rebecca Ayres in 1858; he married (second) Mrs. Martin (Hole) Smith in 1868.
12. Catherine Ccx, born June 5, 1839.
Nancy (Sparks) Cox, wife of Tunis, died on June 7, 1841. Tunis married as his second wife Sarah Sauter on April 7, 1842.

Mrs. Gibbs has generously loaned us a daguerrotype of Harriet Cox (born 1836, died 1868), daughter of Tunis and Nancy (Sparks) Cox. With her in this picture is her husband, Alexander Dom, Sr., who was born in 1834 and died on June 28, 1898. This was probably their wedding picture.

[Note:  Near the bottom of page 1168 appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

Alexander and Harriet (Cox) Dom

(View photograph)

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Additional Notes on the Descendants of Isaac Sparks (continued):

Alexander and Harriet (Cox) Dom, Sr., were the parents of the following children:

1. & 2. Twins, died in infancy.
3. Alma Dom, married - - - - - Wolfram.
4. William Dom.
5. Alexander Dom, Jr., born February 12, 1865, in Piqua, Ohio, died January 10, 1930; he married Catherine Smith on June 14, 1887. Mrs. Gibbs is a granddaughter of this union.
6. G. Ivan Dom, born 1866.
After Harriet’s death, Alexander Dom, Sr., married Anna Chick by whom he had five children.

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ADDITIONAL NOTES ON THE DESCENDANTS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON SPARKS (Ca.1806-l870)

By Flossie Sweaney

In the QUARTERLY of September 1965 (Vol. XIII, No. 3, Whole No. 51, pp. 925-27) we published a record prepared by W. F. Arnall of the descendants of George Washington and Nancy Sparks. George Washington Sparks was a son of Richard and Anna (Smith) Sparks and was born about 1806 in Iredell County, North Carolina. He died in Wright County, Missouri, on October 8, 1870. (See the QUARTERLY of September 1962, Vol. X, No. 3, Whole No. 39, p. 663.) One of the children of George W. and Nancy Sparks was a daughter named Tabetha, who was born in 1834. She married Henry Seagraves. One of the children of Henry and Tabetha (Sparks) Seagraves was a daughter named Rachel Seagraves. She married Isaac Owens.

Following the death of Rachel, Isaac Owens married as his second wife, Sarah Bradshaw, who was a daughter of Wade P. and Senith (Sparks) Bradshaw. Senith (Sparks) Bradshaw, born about 1810, was a daughter of Richard and Anna (Smith) Sparks. Thus, Isaac Owens’ first wife, Rachel Seagraves, was a first cousin once removed of his second wife, Sarah Bradshaw.

In a sketch on Sarah Bradshaw in the QUARTERLY of June 1965 (Vol. XIII, No. 2, Whole No. 50, p. 901) we gave a list of her children by Isaac Owens, with a brief reference to the children of Isaac Owens by his first wife, Rachel Seagraves. Following is a more detailed record of the children of Isaac and Rachel (Seagraves) Owens:

1. Eva Owens, daughter of Isaac and Rachel (Seagraves) Owens, was born in 1874. She went to Oklahoma and married an Indian who had been married before and had a daughter of his first wife. No further information.
2. William Owens, son of Isaac and Rachel (Seagraves) Owens, was born in 1875 in Missouri. He died in Meridan, Idaho, as a result of being thrown from a horse.. He married Hiley Forrest, daughter of John and Julie (Giedon) Forrest; she was born May 25, 1875, and died in 1942 in Melba, Idaho. They were the parents of the following children:
(1) Odessa Owens, born 1896, died 1898; buried in the Oak Grove Cemetery, Norwood, Missouri.
(2) Elmer Huel Owens, born October 24, 1900; married Caroline Rodeignez. No children.

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 Children of William and Hiley (Forrest) Owens, continued:
(3) Don Raymond Owens, born November 30, 1902. He never married.
(4) Iva Pansy Owens, born May 26, 1904, in Meridan, Idaho. She married Lee Rufes Harrington on March 26, 1919. He was born Sept. 6, 1891, in Steuben County, New York, and died on July 26, 1960. He was buried in the Buck Creek Cemetery, Vera, Okla. His parents were Rufus Adelbert and Alice (Moore) Harrington. Following is a list of their children:
(A) Lillie Mable Harrington, born Feb. 26, 1920, in Wood Co., Okla, died Oct. 23, 1921, Norwood, Mo.

(B) Lenora Doris Harrington, born Dec. 12, 1921, in Norwood, Mo., died Oct. 4, 1926, and buried in Buck Creek Cemetery, Vera, Okla. She was drowned in the 1926 flood at Vera.

(C) Lee Roy Harrington, born Oct. 5, 1923, in Norwood, Mo.; he married Helen Friend, daughter of Frank Wesley and Mary Elizabeth (Lindsay) Friend, on July 2, 1949, in Sunnyside, Washington. She was born October 18, 1929, in Wichita, Kansas. Their children: (a) Dennis C. Harrington, born Dec. 8, 1950; (b) Charles A. Harring ton, born Nov. 19, 1952; and (c) Stanley Warren Herrington, born Oct. 27, 1953.

(D) Orlan Harrington, born Jan. 10, 1925, in Norwood, Mo. He married Arlene Teadke, daughter of Paul Jackson and Mary (Wacken) Teadke, on Aug. 4, 1946, in Norfolk, Nebr. They have one son, Bruce E. Herr ington, born Dec. 29, 1951, in Oklahoma City, Okla.

(E) Dwain Forest Harrington, born August 18, 1926, in Vera,
Okia. He married Marjorie Roehr, daughter of Wallace W. and Eva Laura (Bales) Roehr, on April 11, 1954. She was born Nov. 8, 1931, in Liberal, Kansas. Children:(a) Dwain Forrest Harrington, born Jan. 15, 1956; (b) Eva Marie Harrington, born June 24, 1958; and (c) Thomas T. Harrington, born Feb. 11, 1962.

(F) Don Kenneth Harrington, born Jan. 11, 1928, in Vera, Okla. He married Joy Homers. Children: (a) Donna Joy Harrington, born Jan. 4, 1959; and (b) Kenneth Wayne Harrington, born Aug. 27, 1960.

(G) Pansy Lea Harrington, born Jan. 13, 1932, in Vera, Okla. She married Fred Underwood, son of Alfred Clinton and Vida Marie (Lusk) Underwood. He was born May 24, 1931. Children: (a) Cathy Sue Underwood, born Dec. 17, 1951; (2) Clinton Lee Underwood, born Jan. 21, 1958; (c)Delbert Underwood, born Nov. 7, 1961; and (d) Carl Joseph Underwood, born Nov. 15, 1964.

(H) Nellie Marie Harrington, born Oct. 7, 1933, in Vera, Okla. She married Orban Sappington, son of Elmar and Jessie lona (Gibson) Sappingtonj he was born March 13, 1930. Children: (a) Rhonda Elaine Sappirigton, born Jan. 1, 1956; (b) Donald Leon Sappington, born June 26, 1957; and (c) Anita Lynn Sappington, born Jan. 20, 1962, died Jan. 21, 1962.

(I) Billy Dean Harrington, born July 31, 1935, in Vera, Okla. He married Idalia Scharsoh. Children: (a) Michal K. Harrington, born Aug. 24, 1959; and (b) Mark R. Harrington, born Aug. 12, 1962.

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Children of Lee Rufes and Iva Pansy (Owens) Harrington, continued:
(J) Flora June Harrington, born Jan. 22, 1937, in Vera, Okia.
She married Dan Allen Smith, Sr., who Twas bb~’non October
18, 1937, in Kansas City, Kansas. His parents were Le
Roy and Edna (Mead) Smith. Children: (a) Dannette L.
Smith, born July 3, 1957, in Warrensburg, Mo.; and (b)
Dan Allen Smith, Jr., born April 15, 1959, in Compton,
Calif.
(K) Ruby Jean Harrington, born June 17, 1939, in Vera, Okla. Unmarried.
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QUERY

Mrs. Edward B. Johnson of 19 Lakeside Club, Tacoma, Washington (98498) is searching for the parentage and other family records of her great-grandmother, ABBIE SPARKS CRISMAN. Mrs. Johnson knows that Abbie Sparks was born in New York in 1848 or 1849, on either January 21 or December 21. She married John Crisman, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1841 or 1842.

Abbie Sparks Crisman lived in a rural farm home eight miles east and five miles north of Holyoke, Colorado (Philips County), from 1889 to about 1896. She later lived in Greeley, Colorado, and possibly in Amherst, Colorado. She had six children:

(1) Ed, who was living in Greeley, Colorado, between 1925 and 1931 and died (there ?) about 1960.
(2) Mae (Scruggs) lived in St. Louis, Missouri, until about 1955. She married Mahlon Zachow and died in Tacoma, Washington, in 1958.
(3) Lois Love (Colburn), born November 18, 1896, was Mrs. Johnson’s grandmother. She died in Tacoma, Washington, in December, 1965.
(4) Daughter, name unknown.
(5) Son or daughter, name unknown.
(6) Son or daughter, name unknown.
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SPARKS BIRTH RECORDS IN ALBANY COUNTY,  NEW YORK

In a volume of typewritten records in the D.A.R. Library in Washington, D.C., devoted to Albany County, New York, there is a section devoted to Church Records. Under the heading for baptisms (from 1786 to 1794) in the Congregation of Helderberg, Jerusalem and Salem, the following births are recorded:

THOMAS SPARKS, born October 6, 1789, baptized December 14, 1790, son of JAMES SPARKS and ELIZABETH FREEMAN.

REBECCA SPARKS, born July 23, 1792, baptized July 3, 1792, daughter of JAMES SPARKS and ELIZABETH FREEMAN.

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WILL OF WILLIAM SPARKS (born ca. 1790, died 1880)

OF ATCHISON COUNTY,  MISSOURI

(Editor’s note: The following document has been copied from a xerox copy loaned the editor by Mrs. Gerald H. Reynolds. This will was recorded in Book 2, page 123, in Atchison County, Missouri, and was admitted to probate on July 9, 1880.)

In the name of God, Amen.

I, William Sparks, of Atchison County, in the State of Missouri, aged eightyfive years - - being of sound mind and discretion, do make and publish this my last will and testament, as follows:

First: I request that my funeral be conducted under the direction of my beloved wife in a plain manner, suitable to my means and position in life and that a suitable stone be placed, by her, to mark the final resting place of my remains. And I direct that my funeral charges and the expenses of administration on my estate and all my just debts be paid out of my personal estate.

Second: I give and bequeath to my beloved wife, Mary Sparks, all the Real Estate and personal property of which I may die seized and all the products thereof to hold and enjoy absolutely during her natural life (unless my said wife shall remarry) then in that case, her interest as herein stated in and to both my Real and personal estate shall cease. All of which is to be received and accepted by her in lieu of dower, and of any distributive share in my personal estate.

Thirdly: I give and bequeath to those of my beloved children, to wit: William J. Sparks, Charlotte Kerriok, Sarah Scott, and Oliver Sparks, who may be living at my death, all the Real Estate and personal property of which I may die seized and the increase thereof, if any, in equal parts after the death or marriage of my said wife, Mary Sparks, and after the payment of the special legacies hereafter.

Fourth: I give and bequeath to my grandchildren who may be living at my death and whose parents, my beloved children, Anna M. Sampson, Eliza - - - - - and Susan - - - - - may be deceased at my death, the sum of fifty dollars, at the death or marriage of my said wife Mary Sparks.

Fifth: I give and bequeath to my beloved step-daughter, Elizabeth Scammon, the sum of fifty dollars at the death or marriage of my said wife Mary Sparks.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name, this 14th day of August 1876.

[signed]  William Sparks
The foregoing instrument was at the date thereof signed and declared by the said William Sparks to be his last will and testament, in his presence, and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto.
[signed] L. W. Campbell of Atchison County, Mo.
Henry Enoch of Atchison County, Mo.
John D. Campbell of Atchison County, Mo.
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NOTES ON THE FAMILY OF WILLIAM SPARKS (ca.l790-1880)

OF ATCHISON COUNTY, MISSOURI

Mrs. Gerald H. Reynolds of 2201 56th Street, Des Moines, Iowa (50310) is a greatgreat-granddaughter of William Sparks, whose will appears on the preceding page. For a number of years she has been searching for clues regarding the parentage of William Sparks and for more detailed records of his children. It is hoped that a reader of the QUARTERLY may be able to supply’ some of the needed data.

William Sparks was born between June 1790 and August 14, 1791, probably in Ohio, although some census records indicate Pennsylvania. It is believed that in the 1820’ s William Sparks lived in Rush County, Indiana, but by 1830 he was living in Franklin County, Indiana, which adjoins Rush County. He was married, probably between 1810 and 1815, to - - - - -  Howel, who undoubtedly died before 1830. His name appears on the 1830 census of Franklin County, Indiana, and his family was enumerated as including his wife (actually his second wife), with one male aged 10 to 15 years, 2 males aged 5 to 10 years, one female aged 15 to 20 years, 1 female aged 10 to 15 years, and 2 females aged 5 to 10 years. There is some reason to believe that the first name of William Sparks’s first wife may have been Catherine. A  William Sparks, with wife Catherine, sold land in Rush County, Indiana, in 1825 to a John Doris (Book B, p. 1).

On February 28, 1830, William Sparks was married to his second wife, a widow named Mary Templeton, in Franklin County, Indiana. She was sometimes called Polly. It is believed that her first husband was named either William Templeton or Wright Templeton. By her first husband, Mary had a son named James M. Templeton, born March 11, 1822, died October 12, 1879, in Atchison County, Missouri, and a daughter named Elizabeth Templeton who married E. D. Scamman.

Mary, second wife of William Sparks, died on December 22, 1879, and was buried in the Greenhill Cemetery, at the northeast edge of Rock Port, Atchison County, Missouri. According to her tombstone, she was 77 years, 6 months, and 16 days of age at the time of her death (thus born, probably, on June 6, 1802).

According to the 1850 census, a daughter of William and Mary Sparks was born in Illinois in 1835. Apparently the family did not remain long in Illinois, for their daughter, Martha, was born in Missouri in 1839.

William Sparks died in 1880. He was buried beside his wife in Greenhill Cemetery at the north-east edge of Rock Port, Missouri, but his tombstone, known to have been broken a number of years ago, has been removed.

By his first wife, Catherine (?) Howel, William Sparks is believed to have had the following children:

1. William J. Sparks. He was still living in 1876 when William Sparks made his will.
2. Charlotte Sparks. Although called “Charlotte Kerrick” in her father’s will in 1876, her husband’s name is given as Albert Herrick in their marriage bond dated June 3, 1833, in Franklin County Indiana. They were married on that date by a Justice of the Peace named Redin Osborn.

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Children of William Sparks (ca.l790—1880) continued:
3. Sarah Sparks, daughter of William and Catherine (?) (Howel) Sparks, was born on October 8, 1824. According to her obituary, she was born in Franklin County, Indiana, but according to her death certificate, she was born in Rush County, Indiana. She was married on October 18, 1842, in Missouri, to George Washington Scott, son of Powel M. and Nancy (McCarty) Scott. It is believed that Sarah (Sparks) and “Wash” Scott were married in or near Savannah, Missouri, since we know that he built the first house in Savannah in 1842. They were the parents of the following children:
(1) John Monroe Scott, born July 12, 1843.
(2) Benjamin Britin Scott, born February 20, 1847.
(3) General Winfield Scott, born February 14, 1849.
(4) William Taylor Scott, born June 7, 1852.
(5) Elizabeth Dorcas Scott, born August 8, 1854.
(6) Mary Catherine Scott, born October 30, 1855.
(7) James Mark Rolland Scott, born January 12, 1859.
(8) Erastus Wallace Scott, born January 8, 1863.
(9) Clarry Francis Scott, born February 7, 1868.
4. Anna M. Sparks, daughter of William and Catherine (?) (Howel) Sparks, was married to Sampson and died before 1880.
5. Eliza A. Sparks, daughter of William and Catherine (?) (Howel) Sparks, married, according to her father’s probate records, a man named Dubois.
By his second wife, Mary, William Sparks had the following children:
6. Oliver G. Sparks, son of William and Mary Sparks, was born about 1832 in Indiana (although the 1870 census gives his birth place as Ohio). His wife’s name was given as Elizabeth on the 1870 census of Clay Township, Atchison County, Missouri - - she was born, according to this census, about 1839 in Missouri. Their children as listed on the 1870 census were:
(1) Franklin Sparks, born about 1858 in Missouri.
(2) May (or Mary) F. Sparks, born about 1860 in Missouri.
(3) Susan A. Sparks, born about 1862 in Missouri.
(4) Charles E. Sparks, born about 1868 in Missouri.
7. Susan H. Sparks, daughter of William and Mary Sparks, was born about 1835 in Illinois. She married William Bartholomew in Atchison County, Missouri, on September 23, 1855. She died before 1880.

8. Martha B. Sparks, daughter of William and Mary Sparks, was born about 1839 in Missouri. She was married to Davis.

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SPARKS FAMILIES ENUMERATED ON THE 1840 CENSUS OF ILLINOIS

 Copied by Carrie Grant Heppen

Editor’s Introduction: Mrs. Heppen, our faithful researcher in Washington, recently had occasion to read the entire 1840 census of Illinois, which is preserved in the National Archives, for one of her clients. As is her custom, Mrs. Heppen watched for the name Sparks and copied the following records for us. She insists that, since she was not searching specifically for the name Sparks, she may have overlooked some, but knowing Mrs. Heppen’s usual accuracy in her research, we are doubtful that she missed any Sparks families, but even though this is possible, the following compilation will be exceedingly useful.

In using the following records, it should be kept in mind that in all federal census records prior to 1850, only the name of the head of each household was actually recorded by the census taker. Following his or her name, all members of the household, including the head, were enumerated in columns by sex and age group. The members of the household so enumerated not only included the parents and their children, but also anyone else living with the family at the time, such as relatives, servants, roomers, etc.

We can be sure that there were persons named Sparks who were living in households headed by persons that were not named Sparks in 1840, but perhaps their number would about offset the number of persons enumerated in Sparks households who were not really Sparkses. It should be kept in mind that census takers often made mistakes, not only in spelling and in counting, but on occasion a family was missed altogether.

The census taker ordinarily recorded whatever data he was told by the person at home the day he stopped. Ages were often guessed at while some members of the household were overlooked. Sometimes parents included sons or daughters who were no longer living at home and who were counted in some other household also. Just because one fails to find his ancestor listed in a given county is by no means positive proof that he was not there.

Where two Sparks households were listed one after the other in the census record, the chances are great that they actually lived side-by-side and were probably closely related. Such families are identified in the following record by the abbreviation “adj.”

The French were the first white settlers in the area that is now Illinois, and by 1750 there were six French communities there. By the Treaty of Paris in 1763, however, all of Illinois was ceded to the British and at least half of the French settlers moved to St. Louis and New Orleans. The British attempted to organize land companies to settle in the Illinois country but they had little success. It was in 1778 that George Rogers Clark made his “conquest” of the Illinois country on behalf of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Virginia then organized the County of Illinois as one of her political subdivisions, but ceded her claim to the area in 1784 to the United States government. Illinois became part of the Northwest Territory in 1787, then in 1800 became part of Indiana Territory. In 1809, Congress created Illinois Territory, which included Wisconsin. In 1818, Wisconsin was separated, and Illinois was admitted as a state.

Most of the early settlers in Illinois came from the Southern States, especially Virginia, Kentucky, and North and South Carolina. With the completion of the Erie Canal in 1825, however, immigrants began coming in large numbers from the East.

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-1177-

SPARKS FAMILIES ENUMERATED ON THE 1840 CENSUS OF ILLINOIS

In 1820, the population of Illinois totaled 55,211.  By 1830, this figure had grown to 157,445, and when the 1840 census was taken, a total of 476,183 people lived in the state.  Of this latter number, 127 lived in Sparks households.
 
 
Males Females
 .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
Brown County .   . .
  T. M. Sparks (p.176) 3 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clark County . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  Martin Sparks (p.100) 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clay County . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Leonard Sparks (p121) 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edgar County . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  Eli Sparks (p. 66) 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 2 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jo Davis County,  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  Vinegar Hill Precinct . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  John Sparks (p.371) 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logan County . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Samuel Sparks (p238) 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Macoupin County . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  Baxter Sparks (p. 33) 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  Wesley H. "    (p. 35) 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 
Males Females
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
Morgan County .   . .
Matthew Sparks (p453) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sangamon County . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Truelove Sparks (p.33) 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Schuyler County . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Mathew Sparks (p111) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0  ||| 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
 Samuel Sparks (p113) 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scott County . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  Elihu Sparks (p.133) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
  James Sparks (p.151) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

***************
-1177-

SPARKS FAMILIES ENUMERATED ON THE 1840 CENSUS OF ILLINOIS, continued:
 
Males Females
 .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
 St. Clair County .   . .
  Alfred Sparks (p. 290) 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  David Sparks (p. 296) 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  Noah Sparks (p. 297) 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Williamson County . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ||| . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 John G. Sparks (p387) 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  ||| 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(Note: One free black male (age not given) was enumerated as living with the family of Alfred Sparks in
St. Clair County.)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

JOHN SPARKS (BORN ABOUT 1776), SOLDIER AND EXPLORER WITH ZEBULON PIKE

Elden G. Burcham of 2020 West E Street, North Platte, Nebraska, has contributed some very interesting notes on a John Sparks who enlisted in the U.S. Army on September 5, 1804, for five years, and accompanied Zebulon Pike on his two famous exploring expeditions.

Mr. Burcham has gathered these notes on John Sparks from the two-volume Journals of Zebulon Montgomery Pike with Letters and Related Documents, edited and annotated by Donald Jackson (Norman, Okia., University of Oklahoma Press, 1966). Very little is known about this John Sparks. When he was a witness at a trial on November 19, 1807, he stated that he was thirty-one years old (thus born about 1776), that he was a native of Virginia, that he was unmarried, and a Presbyterian. (Vol. 2, p. 219) On the “Muster Poll of Pike’s Men” (Vol. 2, p. 232) dated June 30, 1807, John Sparks was listed as a private, having enlisted on September 5, 1804, for five years. His term of service ended in 1809, but at that time he was being held as a captive by the Spanish in Chihushua, Mexico. He was released later that year, and, although on one record was listed as having deserted, he had actually reenlisted in Captain Mathew Arbuckles’ company on December 13, 1809 (Vol. 2, p. 368). In January, 1807, Lieutenant Pike had noted in his journal that Sparks’s feet had been frozen and feared he would be crippled f or life, but apparently he recovered.

We have no further information on John Sparks, nor was Donald Jackson, who edited the Pike journals, able to learn what eventually became of him. Nevertheless, we know this about John Sparks - - he participated in two memorable expeditions in the opening of the West.

***************
-1178-

JOHN SPARKS (BORN ABOUT 1776), SOLDIER MID EXPLORER WITH ZEBULON PIKE, continued:

Zebulon Montgomery Pike, an officer in the United States Army, was selected in 1805 to trace the upper course of the Mississippi River. He set out from St. Louis on August 9, 1805, with twenty men, one of whom was John Sparks, whose major function was that of a hunter. Captain Pike and his men reached what is now Little Falls, Minnesota, where they built a fort and continued their explorations. They returned to St. Louis in April 1806.

General James Wilkinson then sent Pike on a second expedition to explore the headwaters of the Red River and the Arkansas River, and to scout  the Spanish settlements in New Mexico. John Sparks was again a member of the party. It was during this expedition in 1806 that the party discovered Pike’s Peak in what is now Colorado. Winter overtook Pike and his men and the party was arrested by the Spanish authorities. Pike himself was soon released, but some of his men, including Sparks, were held captive until 1809.

Following are the notes on John Sparks extracted by Elden G. Burcham from the two volume Journals of Zebulon Montgomery Pike with Letters and Related Documents, edited and annotated by Donald Jackson (Norman, Okla., University of Oklahoma Press, 1966).

Page 6, Footnote 1.  (Donald Jackson here gives a list of the men who comprised Pike’s party.) Sergeant Henry Kennerman; Corporals Samuel Bradley and William E. Meek; and Privates John Boley, Peter Brandson, Jeremiah Jackson, Hugh Menaugh, Theodore Miller, John Mountjoy, David Owens, Alexander Roy, Patrick Smith, John Sparks, Freegift Stout, and David Whelpley.

Page 31. 14th Septr. Saturday [1805.]  Mr. Frazer, Bradley, Sparks and myself went out a hunting; crossed in the first instance, a dry, Flat Prairie.

Page 51. 24th October Thursday [1805] The snow having fell one or two inches the over night, I sent out one hunter, (Sparks) and went out myself - - my other hunter (Bradley), being sick. Each of us killed two Deer, one Goose and one Pheasant.

Page 51. 25th October Friday [1805] Sent out men with Spark’s, to bring in his game. Him and two of the men did not get in. We supposed them to be lost in the Hemlock Swamps, with which the Country abounds. But every thing afforded matter for the coward (of whom I believe my Interpreter to have been one) as he insisted they were killed by the Sauteaux. Made arrangements for my departure.

Page 53. 1st November Friday [1805] All turned out to hunt. None killed anything but Sparks one Doe.

Page 56. 6th November Wednesday [1805]  After Miller left the camp on our way home Sparks killed two Deer, about six miles off; and it being near the River I sent the three boys down with the Canoe,

Page 57. 8th November Friday [1805] They were much grieved to hear my report of my other Boys, (Viz) Corporal Bradley, Sparks and Miller.

Page 58. 11th November Monday [1805]  I went out a hunting, and saw but two Deer; and killed a remarkable large black Fox. Bradley and Miller arrived, having understood the writing on the snow, and left Sparks behind at the Camp to take care of the meat. Their detention was owing to their not being able to find their Deer; and being lost on the Prairie the first night.

***************
-1179-

NOTES ON JOHN SPARKS FROM ZEBULON PIKE’S JOURNAL, continued:

Page 64. 2nd December Monday [1805] Sparks arrived from the party below, and informed me they could not kill any game, but had started up with the little perogue. Also that Mr. Dickson and a Frenchman, - - - - -

Page 100. 4th March Tuesday [1806]  We passed on opposite to our Encampment, on the 13 December, and encamped at the place where Sparks and some men had an old hunting camp; and where the Fresiè (a Chipeway chief) surrounded them.

Page 247. No. 17, Pike to Henry Kennerman. Instruction delivered to sergeant Henry Kennerman, at Pine creek rapids, October 1, 1805.
 - - - - - Your guards to consist of one non-commissioned officer and three privates, yourself mounting in regular rotation, making one centinel by day and by night; and, until your position is inclosed by pickets, every man is to be employed on that object; after which Sparks is to be employed in hunting; but this will by no means excuse him from his tour of guard at night when in the stockade; but he must be relieved during the day by another man.

Journal of the Western Expedition

Page 291, Note 1. 15th July, 1806, Tuesday. The party consisted of Lieutenants Pike and Wilkinson, Dr. Robinson, Interpreter Baronet Vasquez, Sergeant Joseph Ballinger, Corporals Jeremiah R. Jackson and William E. Meek, and these privates: John Boley, Samuel Bradley, John Brown, Jacob Carter, Thomas Daugherty, William
Gordon, Solomon Huddleston, Henry Smith, John Sparks, Freegift Stout, and John Wilson.

Page 298. 2d August, Saturday [1806] The loading being spread out to dry. Dr. Robinson, myself, Bradley, Sparks, and Brown went out to hunt. We killed four deer; the Indians two.

Page 301. 9th August, Saturday [806] Sparks went out to hunt, and did not arrive at our encampment, nor did the Indians.

Page 301. 10th August, Sunday [1806] Passed the Indians, who were encamped on the west shore, about half a mile, and halted for them. They all forded the river but Sans Oreille, who brought his wife up to the boats, and informed me that Sparks had encamped with them, but left them early to return in search of us. We proceeded after breakfast. Sparks arrived just at the moment we were embarking.

Page 302. Footnote 31. [Jackson, the editor, here explains:]  Pike’s waiter or personal servant, Private Thomas Daugherty. His waiter on the first expedition, David Whelpley, was not a member of this party. Pike never identifies Daugherty as his waiter, but in his journal entry for January 20, 1807, two men are frostbitten and one is his waiter. The men are Sparks and Daugherty. Earlier, in an entry for October 18, 1806, Pike mentions his waiter under circumstances which rule out Sparks. Furthermore, Sparks is several times identified as a hunter; the two roles could never be combined.

Page 303. 13th August, Wednesday [1806] It continued to rain. In the morning sent a boat over for Sparks’s gun and deer.

Page 332. 8th October, Wednesday [1806]  I conceived it best to send Baroney back to the village with a present, to be offered for our horse, the chief having suggested the propriety of the measure; he met his son and the horse with Sparks.

***************
-1180-

NOTES ON JOHN SPARKS F1~OM ZEBULON PIKE’S JOURNAL, continued:

Page 335. 14th October, Tuesday [1806] Sparks did not come up, being scarcely able to walk with rheumatic pains.

Page 354. 4th December, Thursday [1806] Marched about five; took up Sparks who had succeeded in killing a cow. Killed two buffalo and six turkies.

Page 361. 24th December, Wednesday [1806] Sent our horses for the meat, shortly after Sparks arrived and informed us he had killed four cows. Thus from being in a starving condition we had 8 beeves in our camp. We now again found ourselves all assembled together on Christmas Eve, and appeared generally to be content, although all the refreshment we had to celebrate that day with, was buffalo meat, without salt, or any other thing whatever.

Page 370. 20th January, Tuesday [1807]  On examining the feet of those who were frozen we found it impossible for two of them to proceed, and two others only without loads by the help of a stick. One of the former was my waiter, a promising young lad of twenty whose feet were so badly frozen as to present every probability of loosing them.

Page 370. 22d January, Thursday [1807]  I furnished the two poor lads who were to remain with ammunition and made use of every argument in my power to encourage them to have fortitude to resist their fate; and gave them assurance of my sending relief as soon as possible. We parted, but not without tears. We pursued our march, taking merely sufficient provisions for one meal in order to leave as much as possible for the two poor fellows, who remained (who were John Sparks and Thomas Dougherty.)

Page 381. 17th February, Tuesday [1807]  In the morning, our two Spanish visitors departed, after I had made them some trifling presents, with which they seemed highly delighted. After their departure, we commenced working at our little work, as I thought it probable the governor might dispute my right to descend the Red river, and send out Indians, or some light party to attack us; I therefore determined to be as much prepared to receive them as possible. This evening the corporal and three of the men arrived, who had been sent back to the camp of the frozen lads. They informed me that two men would arrive the next day; one of which was Menaugh, who had been left alone on the 27th January, but that the other two, Dougherty and Sparks, were unable to come. They said that they had hailed them with tears of joy, and were in despair when they again left them, with the chance of never seeing them more. They sent on to me some of the bones taken out of their feet, and conjured me by all that was sacred, not to leave them to perish far from the civilized world. Ah! little did they know my heart, if they could suspect me of conduct so ungenerous. Not before they should be left, I would for months have carried the end of a litter, in order to secure them, the happiness of once more seeing their native homes; and being received in the bosom of a grateful country.
Thus the poor lads are to be invalids for life, made infirm at the commencement of manhood and in the prime of their course, doomed to pass the remainder of their days in misery and want; for what is the pension? not sufficient to buy
a man his victuals!  what man would even lose the smallest of his joints for such a trifling pittance.

[Note: This is the last entry in Pike’s diary that refers to John Sparks. As we noted on p. 1177, it is known that Sparks was kept in captivity by the Spanish in Chihushua, Mexico, until 1809 when he reinlisted in the U.S. Army, in Captain Mathew Arbuckles’ company.]

 *****************
-1181-

WHO WAS THE THOMAS SPARKS WHO WAS FINED $23.00 IN DECEMBER 1816

AT THE MOUTH OF THE KENTUCKY RIVER

BY AN INTOXICATED JUDGE AND JURY?

(Editor’s Note: The following document has been preserved among the papers of Kentucky’s Governor Gabriel Slaughter in the Kentucky Historical Society’s library in Frarikfort. At present, we know nothing more about this Thomas Sparks than what he reveals about himself in this document. He was obviously in the prime of life in 1816, judging from the manner in which he cleared his keel boat of a party of “disorderly men.” Any clues regarding his identity will be appreciated.)

To his Excellency The Governor of Kentucky

 Your Petitioner, Thomas Sparks, respectfully showeth that on the 3rd day of December 1816 when at the mouth of the river Kentucky, and having the command of a keel boat laden with salt, several disorderly men came on board from the Town of Port William, and behaved themselves indecently towards your Petitioner who with mildness requested them to leave his boat being then about to ascend the river. The men premptorily refused and with threats and very opprobrious language abused and insulted your Petitioner, who in consequence of their refusal was compelled to use force to clear his said boat of the said turbulent men; it is true your Petitioner did strike some of the said men, but was compelled threto by the outrageous conduct of the said men and to maintain the rightful and undisturbed occupancy of the said boat. Your Petitioner further represents to your Excellency that immediately afterwards he was arrested by a warrant from a Mr. Samuel Turner, a Justice of the Peace living in the said Town under the authority of the Act of Assembly against Riots routs &c. That your Petitioner was brought to his trial before the said Samuel Turner and a Jury of twelve men selected for that purpose - - that at the time of the said trial not only the said Samuel Turner, the Justice, but a majority of the Jury men chosen and summoned by the officer of the said Justice, was very much intoxicated by spirituous liquor, so as to render them totally incompetent to Judge of the case or to decide correctly, your Petitioner being a stranger. The intemperate Justice and his intemperate Jurors intemperately adjudged your Petitioner to pay a fine of $20 & costs amounting in all to $23, a Judgment which your Petitioner considers to.be oppressive & unjust. Your Petitioner is well advised that the laws of his government ought strictly to be observed, and that the delinquent should be punished, but the guilt of the accused should be made manifest by sober testimony before a temperate and upright Judge and a Jury whose minds were not bewildered and disordered by the intemperate use of ardent spirits. Your Petitioner states that he has been illegally condemned and adjudged, that the act charged against him when properly explained was such as by the laws of his Government he would be Justified. Your Petitioner does not rely upon his statement alone, he begs the attention of your Excellency to affidavits which accompany his Petition; and resting upon the Judgment and sound discretion of your Excellency, he humbly petitions f or a remission of the said fine, so illegally & unjustly adjudged against him. And as in Duty bound he will ever pray &c.

[signed] Thos. Sparks
               Dec. 16th 1816

***************
-1182-

WHALING MASTERS NAMED SPARKS

In the American Guide Series, there is a volume entitled Whaling Masters, prepared by the Federal Writers’ Project of the Works Progress Administration of Massachusetts, published by the Old Dartmouth Historical Society of New Bedford, Mass., in 1939.

According to the preface of this work: “In the early days of whaling such an entry as ‘Captain Abbott of the S. R. Soper’ was considered sufficient identification and few given names were recorded. Even United States Customs records contain, In most instances, only the master’s surname. Research through age yellowed newspaper files and musty log books by Federal Writers’ Project Works provided most of the given names included in this listing.”

On page 261 of this book, appear the following records of whaling ships that were commanded by captains named SPARKS.
 

Captain Year Name of Ship Port
Sparks, - - - - -  1841 Stranger  Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, - - - - -  1845  Targuin Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, - - - - -  1850 A. Nickerson Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, - - - - -  1886 Sarah B. Lewis Boston, Mass.
Sparks,  - - - - -  1891 B. F. Herriman San Francisco, Calif.
Sparks, - - - - -  1891 Stamboul San Francisco, Calif.
Sparks,  - - - - -  1893  B. F. Herriman San Francisco, Calif.
Sparks, - - - - -  1894  Rising Sun Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Charles 1880 Edward Lee Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Charles 1881 Edward Lee Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Charles A.  1910 Volkyria New Bedford, Mass.
Sparks, Charles H.  1868 Mary E. Nason Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey 1842 Carter Braxton Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey  1843 Carter Braxton Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey  1862 C. L. Sparks Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey 1866  C. L. Sparks  Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey  1872 C. L. Sparks  Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey 1874  C. L. Sparks New Bedford, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey  1876  C. L. Sparks Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey  1878 C. L. Sparks  Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey  1879 C. L. Sparks  Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Harvey  1880 C. L. Sparks  Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Herman  1858 N. S. Knight  Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Herman  1859  N. S. Knight  Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Herman  1860 N. S. Knight Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Herman  1861 N. S. Knight  Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Herman  1866 Olive Clark Provincetown, Mass.
Sparks, Herman  1867 Olive Clark Provincetown, Mass.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * *

AN 1829 SPARKS MARRIAGE IN ROCHESTER, MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK

The following Sparks marriage is recorded in a typewritten, bound volume in the D.A.R. Library in Washington, D.C., entitled “Early Marriages in Rochester, Monroe County, New York, and in the Vicinity, taken from Church Records and Newspapers.”

HENRY SPARKS to Orpha Crane, December 31, 1829
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Scanned and Edited by James J. Sparks