THE
SPARKS QUARTERLY

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION

“He who careth not from whence he came, careth little whither he goeth.” Daniel Webster


VOL. X, NO. 2  JUNE, 1962
WHOLE NO. 38a

 
Index Next Page Previous Page Previous Whole No.

[Here appears a photocopy of a document, beneath which is the following caption:]
 

THE WRITTEN DISCHARGE, DATED 1817, OF MATTHEW SPARKS (born ca.1782, died 1850)

OF MECKLENBURG COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND GREENE COUNTY, INDIANA

(View Discharge)

(See wording of discharge at bottom of page 640)

***************
-640-


 
THE SPARKS QUARTERLY, published by The Sparks Family Association.

      Paul E. Sparks, President, 155 N Hite Ave., Louisville 6, Kentucky.
      William Perry Johnson, Historian-Genealogist, Box 531 Raleigh, North Carolina.
      Russell E. Bidlack, Secretary-Treasurer, 1709 Cherokee Rd., Ann Arbor, Michigan.

The Sparks Family Association was founded in March, 1953, as a non-profit organization devoted to the assembling of and preserving for posterity all genealogical and historical material pertaining to the Sparks family in America.  Membership in the Association is open to all persons connected in any way with the Sparks family, whether by blood, marriage, or adoption, and especially to those interested in genealogical and historical research. Membership falls into three classes: Active, Contributing, and Sustaining. Active membership dues are two dollars per year; Contributing membership dues are three dollars per year; Sustaining membership dues are any amount over three dollars. All members, whether Active, Contributing, or Sustaining, receive THE SPARKS QUARTERLY as it is published in March, June, September, and December. Libraries, genealogical and historical societies, and individuals may subscribe to the QUARTERLY without joining the Association at the rate of two dollars per year. Back issues are kept in print and are available for fifty cents per issue. The first issue of the QUARTERLY was published in March, 1953. The editor from March, 1953, to September, 1954, was Paul E. Sparks; since September, 1954, the editor has been Russell E. Bidlack. The QUARTERLY is printed at the Edwards Letter Shop, .711 N. University, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812

BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

(Continued from page 637)


MATTHEW SPARKS, born about 1782 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia; enlisted at Bellefield, Va., in 1812; died about 1850 in Greene County, Indiana. Widow MARY SPARKS Bounty Land Warrant File 25 511-160-12.

Most of the papers in this file have been lost. Two of the papers remaining are letters written on November 14, 1853, by H. L, Livingston and A. L. Rhoads, both of Bloomfield, Indiana, on behalf of Mary Sparks, widow of Mathew Sparks. The only other document in the file is the written discharge of Matthew Sparks which has been reproduced on the cover of this issue of the QUARTERLY. The discharge reads as follows:

TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.

Know ye, That Matthew Sparks, a Private of captain Louring Hustin company Eighth regiment of Infantry who was enlisted the Twenty fifth day of May one thousand eight hundred and Twelve to serve Five Years is hereby Honorably Discharged from the Army of the United States by Reason of his tour of Service having Expired.

Said Matthew Sparks was born in Mecklenburgh county in the state of Virginia, is Thirty years of age, Five feet Ten and half inches high, Dark complexion, Dark eyes, Dark hair, and by occupation when enlisted a Farmer.

                                                                             Given at Ross Christian, M.T. this Twenty fifth day of May 1817.
                                                                                                                                    G. H. Hennerly, Lt.
                                                                                                                                    Commanding.

***************
-641-

The letters in this file written by Rhoads and Livingston read as follow:

                                                                                                                        "Bloomfield, Greene Co., Ind.
                                                                                                                            "November 14, 1853
"Dear Sir
        "I must take the liberty of pressing upon your attention the claim of Mary Sparks, the widow of Matthew Sparks, who was a soldier in the regular army of 1812 for five years. He entered the service at Bellefield, Va., in the company commanded by Capt. Thos. M. Nelson, being enlisted by Lieutenant Walls, on the 25th day of May 1812, in the 10th (I think) Regiment commanded by Colonel Willbour. After the promotion of Capt. Nelson, he was under the command of Lieutenant Mountjoy until he was discharged. He was successively in the regiment commanded by Col. Wilbour, Colonel Nicholson, Col. Hamilton.
        "Mary Sparks forwarded her papers and Declaration for bounty land about three years since. Nothing was heard from the Department until about eighteen months thereafter when the Commissioner of Pensions stated that the declaration had been referred to some office, I believe the 3rd Auditor, for examination, since which time she has not heard one syllable, though I have often troubled the officers of the Department with communications for her.
        "If the papers are lost, I can forward new ones, I having in my possession the sworn declaration of Matthew Sparks made a short time before his death.
        "Mrs. Sparks is old and very poor & needy. No one has a cents worth of interest in procuring her warrant, not even as to fees, and it most assuredly would be a great favor, if she could be informed why the warrant is not forthcoming, and when recd. will be of great assistance to her, in her old age and poverty.
        "Please give the matter your attention, and at least write that she may know the cause of the delay, and she may be able to hasten the investigation by some timely information.

                                                                                                                    " Yours truly
    "Hon. Comr of Pensions                                                                                 A. L. Rhoads."
            "Washington D.C.

- - - - - - - - - - -

                                                                                                                    "Bloomfield, Indiana
                                                                                                                            "Nov. 14th 1853
"Dear Sir.
        "I have glanced over the letter of Mr. Rhoads on the subject of the Mrs. Mary Sparks, widow of Mathew Sparks, for bounty land under act of 28 Sept. 1850. The statement I am satisfied is correct for I well remember making out the original declaration for Sparks in his lifetime which was not forwarded on account of his death. She is evidently entitled to bounty land and the statement of Sparks as contained in his declaration I am certain is correct for he was a person of strict truth.

        "The representation made by Mr. Rhoads of her poverty is but too true. She [is] indigent & an object of commiseration, please give the subject your attention & if the papers are misplaced they can readily be supplied. If the claim is surpassed please write what is to [be] done.
                                                                                                                    "I am Sir with much
"S. P. Waldo,                                                                                                     "Esteem your obdt. sevt.
"Comr. of Pensions."                                                                                                 "H. L. Livingston."

- - - - - - - - - - - -

Mary Sparks received a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: There is no additional information in the Association's files on this Matthew Sparks. We know that there was a Sparks family in Mecklenburgh County, Vir-

***************
-642-

ginia,  because in a volume entitled Marriage Bonds of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, 1765-1810 the following bonds are listed:

                    William Sparks to Judith Thompson, 9 Jan, 1804. Bernard Thompson, Security.
                    Martha Sparks to Benjamin Bowen, 12 Sept. 1803. Zachariah Yancy, Security.

Matthew Sparks was doubtless closely related to the above William and Martha Sparks. From the letters of Rhoads and Livingston, it appears that Matthew Sparks was living in Greene County, Indiana, in September, 1850, but died shortly thereafter. However, neither his nor his wife Mary's name was found when the 1850 census of Greene County was searched for persons named Sparks. Several other Sparks families were living in Greene County, however, according to the 1850 census and may have been related to Matthew and Mary. (See the QUARTERLY of September, 1959, Vol. VII, No. 3, pp. 426-28.[Whole No. 47])

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

MATHEW SPARKS born about 1790 in Baltimore County, Maryland; died May 12, 1874, in Baltimore County. Widow, MARY (JOHNSON) SPARKS, born about 1826; died 1901. Pension File WC 17 221.

On May 11, 1878, Mary Sparks, widow of Mathew Sparks, made application for a pension under the act of March 9, 1878. In her application, she stated that she was 52 years old and a resident of Baltimore County, Maryland. She stated that her husband, Mathew Sparks, had served as a private in a company commanded by Capt. Joseph Jenkins in a cavalry regiment commanded by Col. John Street in the War of 1812; that he had been drafted in Baltimore County in the summer of 1814 and that he had served at least 14 days.

At the time of his enlistment, she stated that Mathew Sparks was about 26 years old; that he had been born at St. James Post Office in Baltimore Co.; that he was a farmer; that he was 5 feet 10 inches tall with blue eyes, black hair, and a light complexion. She stated that she and Mathew Sparks had been married in Baltimore City, Maryland, on January 10, 1849, by a Rev. Tibbit, a minister of the M.E. Church; that her name before her marriage was Mary Johnson and that neither she nor her husband had been married previously, She stated that Mathew Sparks died in Baltimore County on May 12, 1874, and that he had lived his entire life near St. James Church in Baltimore County, She stated that her husband had received a land warrant about 1854 for 160 acres, (His application was abstracted on page 636 of the QUARTERLY of March, 1962.) Mary Sparks signed her application by name; Isaac Standiford, aged 76, and William T, Perdue, aged 44, signed as witnesses.

Mary Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month, This was later increased to $12.00 and was paid until her death in 1901.

(Editor's Note: This abstract should have been combined with that of Mathew Sparks's application for bounty land which appeared on page 636 of the March, 1962, issue of the QUARTERLY [Whole No. 37], Mathew Sparks (sometimes spelled Matthew) was a son of Josiah Sparks, Jr,, (born about 1752, died 1846), of Baltimore County, Maryland, See the QUARTERLY of June, 1958, Vol, VI, No, 2, [Whole No. 22] for additional material on this family.)

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

MATTHEW SPARKS, born about 1781; of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and Rockingham County, North Carolina. Bounty Land Warrant File 33 407-120-55.

On October 13, 1854, Matthew Sparks, a resident of Rockingham County, North Carolina, appeared before a justice of the peace named Joseph Holderby, to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 73 years old;

***************
-643-

that he had been an ensign in a company commanded by Lt. John Adams in the 4th Regt. of Virginia Militia commanded by Col. Greenhill in the War of 1812; that he was drafted at Beavers Tavern in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, on or about September 1, 1814, for six months and continued in service for about 3 months and 15 days and was honorably discharged at Camp Ellicott's Mills, Maryland, on December 1, 1814. He signed his application as "Mat Sparks." D. J. Rausley and John G. Wither (?) signed as witnesses. He was issued a land warrant (No. 102,051) for 40 acres.

On April 9, 1855, Matthew Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was a resident of Rockingham County, North Carolina, and was 74 years old. He gave his service in the War of 1812 as he had done in 1854. He again signed his name as "Mat Sparks." D. E. Guerrant and John Hudson, residents of Rockingham County, signed as witnesses. He was issued warrant No. 84,504 for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: This Matthew Sparks belonged to the Sparks family of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, on which a considerable amount of data were published in the QUARTERLY of September, 1955, and March, 1956 [Whole No. 13]. He was probably the Matthew Sparks whose marriage bond with Mary Vaughan, daughter of William Vaughan, is dated December 28, 1818, and is on file in Pittsylvania County. Matthew Sparks moved to Rockingham County, North Carolina, about 1846 (see the QUARTERLY of September, 1956, Vol. IV, No, 3, p. 162 [Whole No. 15]), He and his wife, Mary, were listed on the 1850 census of Rockingham County (see the QUARTERLY of December, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 4, p. 603 [Whole No. 36]). The S. P. Sparks, aged 21, living with Matthew and Mary in 1850 was probably a son. The M. T. Sparks, aged 26, and the William H. Sparks, also aged 26, who were listed on the 1850 census of the same county, were probably also sons.)

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

MOSES SPARKS, born about 1789, in Jefferson County, Kentucky; died in 1858, in Collin County, Texas. Bounty Land Warrant File 17180-160-55.

On August 11, 1851, Moses Sparks, a resident of Collin County, Texas, appeared before a justice of the peace to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 62 years old and that he had served as a private in a company commanded by Capt. John Biggart or Biggard in a regiment of volunteers in the War of 1812; that he had volunteered at Charleston, Indiana (in Clark County) on or about June 4, 1814, for one year and had been honorably discharged on June 4, 1815. He stated that he had not received a written discharge. (War Department records revealed that he actually served from June 1, 1814, to June 1, 1815.) He signed his application as "Moses Sparks." He was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land in May, 1852.

(Editor's Note: Ray M. Sparks, 2206 Junius, San Angelo, Texas, is a great-grandson of Moses Sparks and has supplied a considerable amount of material on Moses Sparks and his descendants. Moses Sparks was born about 1789 in Jefferson County, Kentucky, and died on December 20, l858 in Collin County, Texas. Moses Sparks was a son of James Sparks (1743-1834) whose Revolutionary War pension papers were published in the September, 1954, issue of the QUARTERLY (Vol. II, No. 3 [Whole No. 7]). (James Sparks was a son of Richard Sparks of Cranbury, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and later of Rosstraver Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Moses Sparks married Elizabeth who was born in Kentucky about 1795. On May 255 1813, Moses Sparks was among a group of settlers of Driftwood, Harrison County, Indiana, who signed a petition to Congress requesting that his brother, Stephen Sparks, be permitted to erect a water grist mill and saw mill. We know from his bounty land application that Moses Sparks enlisted in 1814 in Charleston, Clark County, Indiana. By 1820 he had moved to Jackson County, Indiana, where his father also lived from about the same date until his death in 1834.

***************
-644-

According to a deed recorded in Jackson County Deed Book C, page 365, on April 27, 1833, Moses Sparks and his wife, Elizabeth, gave a plot of land "to Major Cummings, James Brown and Benjamin Newkirk, trustees of the Baptist Meeting House, for the purpose of erecting a church." According to the agreement, the trustees were permitted to select a day and a night to be set aside for their meetings, but all other religious organizations were likewise to be permitted to use the land for religious purposes. The land was given "in consideration of the love and affection that Moses Sparks and wife have for the church."  Sometime after 1842, Moses and his family moved to Texas, probably by way of Missouri. By 1850 he was a resident of Collin County, Texas. Moses and Elizabeth Sparks were the parents of several children, born in Indiana between 1817 and 1834. We know the names of only four:

                        Richard Sparks, born about 1826, died 1866; married Emily Eliza Bell.
                        Sarah Sparks, born 1828.
                        A.J. Sparks, born 1832.
                        Elizabeth Sparks, born 1834.

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

MOSES S. SPARKS, born about 1813; a resident of Lowades County, Mississippi, in 1836 and of Panola County, Mississippi, in 1855. Bounty Land Warrant File 33 627-160-55.

On April 21, 1855, Moses S. Sparks, a resident of Panola County, Mississippi, appeared before an acting justice of the peace named William Herring and made application for bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. Moses S. Sparks stated that he was 42 years old and that he had been a private in the company of Mississippi volunteers commanded by Capt. Prior M. Grant in the War with the Comanche Indians in 1836. He stated that he had volunteered in Lowndes County, Mississippi, on or about August 8, 1836, marched to Jackson, Mississippi, and was mustered into the service of the U.S. by Major General Dunlap about five or six days later; he stated he had been discharged in October, 1836, in Lowndes County. He appointed Wylie P. Wootten of Panola, Mississippi, to be his attorney. He signed his name as "Moses S. Sparks." Orville Harmon, aged 49, and Michael T. Wright, aged 28, both of Ponola County, signed as witnesses; they stated they had known Moses S. Sparks for several years. He was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

NATHAN F. SPARKS, born about 1810 in Tennessee; resident of Tallapoosa County, Alabama, before 1836 and until death removal to Anderson County, Texas, between 1850 and 1855; a resident of Johnson County, Texas, in later years. Bounty Land Warrant File 52 454-120-55.

On May 28, 1851, Nathan F. Sparks, a resident of Tallapoosa County, Alabama, appeared before a justice of the peace named Luke Davenport, to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 40 years old and that he had served as "4th corporal in a Company commanded by Capt. John H. Brodnax, an Independant Volunteer Horse Company know: as the Tallassee Guards in the War with the Creek Tribe of Indians in the year A.D. 1836." He stated that he had volunteered in Tallapoosa County sometime between May 4th and 27th, 1836, for 3 months and was discharged at Tallassee in Tallapoosa County on or about the last day of July 1836; that he did not receive a written discharge. (War Department records proved that he served from May 4 to Aug. 6, 1836.) He signed his application as "Nathan F. Sparks." He appointed John A. Jordan,an attorney of Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, Alabama, as his attorney. He was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land.

On April 25, 1855, Nathan F. Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He was now a resident of Anderson County, Texas, and he made

***************
-645-

application for bounty land before a justice of the peace named Morris R. Reagan. He gave no additional information regarding his service. He signed as "Nathan F. Sparks"; Wiley H. Bowen and John L. Bailey signed as witnesses. He was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: Nathan F. Sparks was born in Tennessee about 1810, and was a son of John Sparks (1784-1836) and his wife, Sarah (Brooks) Sparks (born 1788, died in the 1860's). John Sparks had served in the same company as his son, Nathan F., in the Indian War of 1836 and in 1854 Nathan made a statement in support of his mother's claim for bounty land (see the QUARTERLY of September, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, p. 581 [Whole No. 35]). Nathan F, Sparks was married to Elizabeth Taylor on March 16, 1836, in Montgomery County, Alabama. Elizabeth apparently died, because his wife's name on the 1850 census of Tallapoosa County was given as "Sarah E. A." aged 28 (see the QIJARTERLY of March, 1959, Vol. VII, No. 1, p. 378 [Whole No. 25]).  Three children were listed with Nathan F. Sparks in 1850: Virginia T. Sparks, aged 13; Frances D. Sparks, aged 10; and Nathan F. Sparks, aged 4. Virginia and Frances were probably daughters by his first wife. By 1870, Nathan F. Sparks was living in Johnson County, Texas, and one other child was listed, a son named John T. Sparks, born about 1859. Nathan F. Sparks was still living in 1880--he was listed on the Johnson County, Texas, census of that year as a hotel keeper and farmer in Alvarado Village; he gave his age as 67 while his wife, Sallie C. Sparks, was listed as 50 years old. Their son, John T. Sparks, aged 21, was still living at home, as was an "adopted daughter" named Zellah Lee, aged 14.)

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

NIMROD SPARKS, born about 1790, in Washington County, Pennsylvania; died January 20, in Jefferson County, Kentucky; married Susan B. Parker in Jefferson County, Kentucky, on February 26, 1826. Bounty Land Warrant File 88 027-160-55 (in the name of Norval W. Sparks, son of Nimrod.)

On May 13, 1859, Susan B. Ball, formerly widow of Nimrod Sparks, signed a statement on behalf of her son, Norval W. Sparks, to enable him to receive bounty land on the basis of the service of his father in the War of 1812. Susan B. Ball was a resident of Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, at the time she made her statement. She stated that she was formerly the wife of Ninrod Sparks--that they were married in Jefferson County, Kentucky, by a preacher named James Ward--she did not give the date of their marriage, but another record revealed that it was February 26, 1826.

She stated that her maiden name was Susan B. Parker. She stated that her husband "told me that he was born and (partly or entirely) raised in Washington County, Pennsylvania--that his parents died when he was a child, and that he lived with an uncle, and that before he was fully grow:: he left his uncle, and sometime afterwards enlisted into the Regular Army of the United States same time during [the] War of 1812." She stated that he had lost; his discharge. (Documents in the Adjutant General's Office proved that Nimrod Sparks had enlisted as a private in Capt. Baker's Company, 3rd Infantry Regiment, on January 26, 1815, for five years, but was discharged on June 10, 1816 as being "unfit for service." She stated that "before he entered the Army he had begun to learn the trade of tanning leather." She stated that his hair was light or auburn, his eyes were blue, complexion fair, had a high forehead and that "he was lame at times--especially when much fatigued."

"She could not remember for sure, but she thought he was discharged because of his lameness. She added: "He spoke in his lifetime of trying to get a Land Warrant, and said that if he had not lost his papers he would have no trouble." She said that "Hon. W. J. Graves (now deceased) our representative in Congress, made some effort for him." She added: "My former husband, said Nimrod Sparks, was never married before he married me, at least he so informed me and I never had any doubt of the truth of his statements and I was the only wife that he ever had. We had two children only, Viz: (1) George W. Sparks, born May 2nd l830 and who died without issue (never having been married)

***************
-646-

December 12th 1850; (2) Norvall W. Sparks, born April 29th 1835."  She stated that Norvall was living in Louisville at the time she was writing. "After the death of said husband I remained his widow until November 15th 1842 when I married Henry L. Ball whose wife I now am.  My said first husband died in this county on the 20th day of January 1840." She signed her statement as "Susan B. Ball."

J. M. Stephens witnessed Susan's signature and added a certified copy of the entries in Nimrod Sparks's family Bible. The dates of birth of the two sons, George W. and Norval, correspond to those given by Susan, as do the dates of death of George W. and Nimrod. The only additional data is the record of marriage of  "N. W. Sparks to Jennie M. Terrell, February 25th 1858."

Also in this file is a sworn statement by Richard P. Lightburne, dated May 16, 1859, in Louisville. He stated he was 52 years old and that he had been intimately acquainted with Ninrod Sparks, that "he was a reputed soldier of the service of the United States--War of 1812. ... I remember that he was reputed and believed to have come from Pennsylvania," He also stated that he was positive that Ninrod and Susan had been married.

Norval W. Sparks made application for bounty land on May 18, 1859. He gave no information about his parents or himself besides what had been given in his mother's statement. He signed his name as "Norval W. Sparks." His mother and Richard P. Lightburn signed as witnesses.

A certificate was signed on May 18, 1859, by T. Jack Conn, Deputy Clerk of Jefferson County Court, to the effect that "it appears by the records of my office that Nimrod Sparks and Susan Parker were married on the 26th day of February 1826 by Revd James Ward."

Norval W. Sparks was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land on the basis of his father's service.

(Editor's Note: Although we have an extensive file on the Sparks family of Washington County, Pennsylvania, we do not find Nimrod Sparks's name among these records. The fact that his parents died while he was a child will probably make it difficult to trace his ancestry, The marriage bond of Nimrod and Susan, which is on file in Jefferson County, Kentucky, reveals that Susan was a daughter of Thomas Parker who gave his consent to the marriage. Several deeds are on file for the purchase and sale of property in Louisville by Nimrod Sparks. The inventory of the property owned by Nimrod at the time of his death has been preserved; included were: "1 negro boy, Jim valued at $600.00; 1 woman and child, Susan and Alice, valued at $400.00; and 1 boy, Jackson, valued at $500.00.")

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

ORSON SPARKS born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, about 1791, son of Daniel & Sarah Sparks; resided in Bullitt County, Kentucky; moved to Clark County, later Scott County, Indiana, following War of 1812; returned to Bullitt County, later Spencer County, Kentucky; about 1830 moved to Marion County, Missouri; died there 1870. Bounty Land Warrant File 55 520-120-55. MARGARET (BURDITT) SPARKS, widow of Orson Sparks, Pension File WC 10 414.

(Editor's Note: Before giving abstracts of the documents in the file of Orson Sparks's claim for bounty land, it is of interest to note that in May, 1827, Orson Sparks made a claim against the United States government for a horse that he had lost while serving as a private in the company commanded by Capt. John Homback in the regiment commanded by Col. John Thomas in the War of 1812. The documents connected with this claim were published as Report No. 83 of the House of Representa-

***************
-647-

tives, 20th Congress, 1st Session. In a statement made in Bullitt County, Kentucky May 27, 182?, John Hornbeck swore that Sparks had been a private in his company and that "he served the campaign up the Wabash river... That the said Sparks' horse was valued, as deponent believes, at forty-five dollars; that the horse was lost while in the service of the United States without the fault of the said Sparks, that the government did not furnish forage or food for the horses on said campaign. After they crossed the Wabash river, the horse became lame, and could not travel, and, in consequence, was lost."  On May 30, 1827, Orson Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace in Bullitt County, Kentucky, and stated that following his service in the War of 1812, he left the state of Kentucky in March, 1813, and did not return until "about three years since," that is, about 1824. He added that he "did not know until lately, that he was entitled to pay for said horse."

In House Report No. 27, 20th Congress, 2d Session, dated December 31, 1828, there appears a statement by an auditor from the Treasury Department as follows: "...it has been found that Capt. Hornbeck's company was in the United States' service 43 days from the 18th September, 1812; that on his muster roll, dated on the 29th of that month, Sparks is described as having private property, to wit: a horse, saddle, bridle, rifle, pouch, horn, tomahawk, and scalping knife, valued in the aggregate at $55.62; that, on his muster roll, dated the 30th October, 1812, there is an entry opposite Sparks's name, in a column headed 'losses of public and private property, in this form--'crippled and left 20th October, 1812'," A bill was introduced in Congress to reimburse Orson Sparks, but whether it passed or not has not been determined.)

On August 9, 1852, Orson Sparks, a resident of Marion County, Missouri, appeared before a justice of the peace to make application for bounty land under the act of April 28, 1850. He had made application earlier, but the papers had been lost. He stated that he was 61 years old and that he had served as a private in Capt. Patterson's company in a regiment of Kentucky Militia "in the war between the United States and Aaron Burr in 1806 & 7--That he was drafted in said service at Shelby County, Kentucky, on or about the month of December, 1806." He stated he had served for 30 days and had "received a printed and written discharge from said service at Union Encampment in Jefferson County, Kentucky." He stated that he had submitted this discharge with his application in 1850, but it had been lost. He stated that he volunteered at Bullard (i.e. Bullitt) County, Kentucky, in "September 1811 in a Ranging Company commanded by Captain Craven Peyton ---that he continued in actual service in this command for about six weeks and was honorably discharged from said service at Louisvil1e, Kentucky, in the month of November, 1811, that he was called out a second time in said servive in the month of August in 1812 and continued in actual service in said company co'mmanded by the said Captain Peyton for the space of about two months. That he volunteered at Vincennes, Indiana, in September, 1812 and ... continued in actual service for the space of one month in Captain Homback's Company of Mounted troops ... he was honorably discharged at Vincennes, Indiana, in the month of October, 1812." He added that his discharge from this service had been lost with his application in 1850. He signed his name as "Orson Sparks." He was issued land warrant No. 80,704 for 40 acres of bounty land.

On May 7, 1855, Orson Sparks, still a resident of Marion County, Missouri, made application for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He gave his age as 64 years; he gave no additional data on his service. He signed again as "Orson Sparks." William P. Harrison and Lloyd P, Hallack, residents of Marion County, signed as witnesses. Orson Sparks was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

Orson Sparks died in Marion County, Missouri, on May 15, 1870. His widow applied for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. There was some confusion regarding her identity and her signature and the result was that a great many letters and documents constitute her file. Only the most important are abstracted below.

***************
-648-

On August 28, 1873, Margaret Sparks, a resident of "near Sharpsburg in the County of Marion and state of Missouri" appeared before the clerk of the County Court to make application for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. She stated that she was 80 years old and was the widow of Orson Sparks. She stated that her husband "went to the war from Bullitt County, Kentucky, and served two terms," but she could not remember the names of his officers, She stated that her maiden name had been Peggy Burditt; that she was called Margaret and Peggy interchangeably; that she and Orson Sparks had been married on September 3, 1811, in Bullitt County, Kentucky, by Simeon Hall, Minister, She stated that her husband had died near Sharpsburg, Missouri, on May 15, 1870. She sigred her application by mark. Her witnesses were Samuel Sparks, Mary Jane Sparks, and Benjamin Davies. Accompanying her application was a sworn statement of the clerk of the Bullitt County Court to the effect that a record of the marriage of Orson Sparks and Peggy Burditt, dated September 3, 1811, was on file in the marriage register.

Because of the inability of Margaret Sparks to recall her husband's service and because of the confusion resulting from the loss of Orson Sparks's first application for bounty land, the Commissioner of Pensions questioned her identity. In an attempt to identify her husband, Margaret Sparks sent some old notes and receipts which were in her husband's handwriting. One of these reads: "Settlement on the 5 of September 1842 with Orson Sparks and James W, Sparks a balance due Orson Sparks of three hundred and fifty two Dollars and 19 Cents September 1842; April 1842 paid by Orson Sparks to Charles Coxts [?] for James W. Sparks $12 Dollars."

On February 28, 1874, Daniel McLeod, a resident of Marion County, Missouri, signed a sworn statement that he had been acquainted with Orson and Margaret Sparks and that they had lived together as man and wife. He stated thst he was "also acquainted with their children, among whom are Daniel K. and his brother Samuel Sparks." He also testified that "Orson Sparks departed this life at his home, on his farm, in this said county and state on or about the middle of May A.D. 1870," and that his sons, Daniel K. Sparks and Samuel Sparks, were administrators of his estate.

Also on February 28, 1874, John W, How, a resident of Marion County, Missouri, stated that he had been acquainted with Orson and Margaret Sparks and that they had lived together as husband and wife.

In spite of these sworn statements and records, the application of Margaret Sparks was rejected on March 24, 1874. However, when a more liberal pension law was passed on March 9, 1878, Margaret Sparks asked that her application be reconsidered. On July 13, 1878, James B. Young, aged 72, and Washington S, Colvert, aged 67, of Marion County, Missouri, made affidavits regarding the identity of Margaret Sparks. They stated that they were near neighbors.

Margaret Sparks usually signed her name with a mark and the Pension Office now questioned her identity because of this. On September 23, 1878, she made a sworn statement that she was "very old and infirm, often being confined to her bed with disease and infirmity--that in consequence, as she resides in the country and is unadvised by counsel, she attaches her name to written instruments sometimes by her own hand with a scrawl, sometimes her daughter in law, Mary H. Sparks, the wife of her son, Daniel K. Sparks, with whom she lives and makes her home writes it by her request when too feeble to do it herself." She signed this statement by mark in the presence of C. B. Layton, Justice of the Peace. Daniel K. Sparks and his wife, Mary H. Sparks, also made sworn statements that they had sometimes signed documents for her "by her special personal request."

On October 17, 1878, Margaret Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month effective as of March 9, 1878. How long she lived after this date is not know.

***************
-649-

(Editor's Note: Orson Sparks was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, about 1791. He was a son of Daniel and Sarah Sparks. (Perhaps they were the Daniel Sparks and Sarah Bogard, daughter of Jacob Bogard, whose marriage was recorded in Mason County, Kentucky, on November 9, 1789.) Daniel Sparks was born about 1765 and was probably a son of Richard Sparks who lived near Cranbury, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and about 1760 moved to what became Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Daniel Sparks then moved to Jefferson County, Kentucky, sometime prior to 1782. He lived in that portion of Jefferson County that became Bullitt County in 1796.

Following the War of 1812, he moved to Clark County, Indiana, settling in that area that became Scott County in 1820. He died about 1820. Daniel and Sarah Sparks were the parents of a large number of children, not all of whom can be identified positively. A probate court order dated October 31, 1820, in Scott County, Kentucky, serves to identify their youngest children: Orson Sparks was appointed guardian of several of his brothers and sisters designated as the "infant and orphan heirs of Daniel Sparks." These were listed as: Harmon Sparks, born Dec. 1, 1803; Elizabeth Sparks, born Feb. 4, 1807; Nancy Sparks, born April 1, 1810; Catherine Sparks, born Feb. 13, 1812; and Hannah Sparks, born Dec. 28, 1813.

Other children of Daniel and Sarah Sparks are believed to have been Samuel K. Sparks, Valentine Sparks, William Sparks and perhaps Hector Sparks and Elijah Sparks. It appears from the 1810 census that Daniel and Sarah Sparks had 7 sons and 4 daughters.

Orson Sparks, one of the oldest sons of Daniel and Sarah Sparks, was married to Margaret Burditt in Bullitt County, Kentucky, on September 3, 1811. They moved with Orson's father to Indiana following the War of 1812 and it was there that their son, Daniel K. Sparks, was born on January 20, 1820. In 1821, Orson Sparks moved back to Bullitt County, Kentucky, settling in the area that became Spencer County in 1824. In 1830 he moved to Marion County, Missouri, where he remained until his death on May 15, 1870. Although Orson and Margaret (Burditt) Sparks had several children, only two sons are know: at this time: (1) Daniel K. Sparks, born Jan. 20, 1820; married Mary H. -----; he was living in 1884 and was a Methodist; (2) Samuel Sparks, born in Marion County, Missouri, March 16, 1836; he married Paulina Young and had one son, Hiram B. Sparks, born in 1872.)

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

RANDALL SPARKS, born about 1778; died 1830; of Gloucester County, New Jersey. Bounty Land Warrant File 3 509-120-55. Widow, REBECCA (STETSER) SPARKS, born about 1794; Pension File WC 2 111.

On December 31, 1850, Rebecca Sparks, a resident of Camden County, New Jersey, appeared before a justice of the peace named Jonathan Burr to make application for bounty land on the basis of the service of her husband, Randall Sparks, under the act of September 28, 1850. She stated that she was 56 years old; that her maiden name had been Rebecca Stetser, and that she had been married to Randall Sparks in Woodbury, New Jersey, on February 4, 1813, and that Randall Sparks had died at Camden, New Jersey, on July 12, 1830. She stated that he had served as a lieutenant in a company commanded by Robert L. Armstrong in the regiment of New Jersey Volunteers know: as the "Woodbury Blues" commanded by Col. Joshua L. Howell, in the War of 1812; that her husband had volunteered at Woodbury, New Jersey, on or about August 20, 1814. She signed her name as "Rebecca Sparks." The witnesses to her signature were Joseph Stetser and Catharine McCullon (?), residents of Camden County, New Jersey, and they stated that they had know: Rebecca Sparks before and after her marriage to Randall Sparks and that "the said Rebecca had children born by him the said Randall Sparks."

To prove her marriage, Rebecca Sparks sent her marriage certificate along with her application. This has been preserved and reveals that the marriage was performed in

***************
-650-

Gloucester County on February 4, 1813, by a justice of the peace named James Matlack. On this marriage certificate the names are given as "Captain Randle Sparks and Miss Rebecca Stetcher."

Army records revealed that Randall Sparks served as a private in Capt. R. L. Armstrong's Company in Col. J. L. Howell's regiment and that he volunteered on August 20, 1814, and was discharged on December 20, 1814. Rebecca Sparks was issued a warrant (No. 60,021) for 40 acres of bounty land.

On March 20, 1855, Rebecca Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. She made the application in Philadelphia, but stated that she was a resident of South Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, and was 61 years old. She gave essentially the same information regarding her husband's service as in the earlier application, but stated he had been a private whereas in 1850 she stated he had been a lieutenant. She signed her name as "Rebeak Sparks." Anne Ross and Sarah Sparks signed as witnesses. Their relationship to Rebecca is not stated. She was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

On August 7, 1871, Rebecca Sparks appeare4 before a clerk of a court of record in Philadelphia to make application for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. She stated that she was a resident of No. 330 Division St., Camden, New Jersey, and was 86 years old. She signed by mark. Her mark was witnessed by Ann Ross and Kesiah Stetser. Her application was approved and she was given a pension of $8.00 per month commencing February 14, 1871.

(Editor's Note: Randall Sparks was born about 1778. He was a son of the Hon. John Sparks (born 1716 -17, died 1802) and his third wife, Ruth, daughter of Alexander Randall. (See the QUARTERLY of March, 1958, Vol. VI, No. 1, p. 286. [Whole No. 21])  Randall Sparks's full name was Alexander Randall Sparks, but he was always know simply as Randall Sparks. He was obviously named for his mother's father, Alexander Randall. He was married twice, first to Ann Clark on November 24, 1803, in Gloucester County, New Jersey. She died in 1811 and he married, second, Rebecca Stetser on February 4, 1813.

According to an account of this family by Francis Bazley Lee in his Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey (New York, 1910), Randall Sparks had children by his first wife: Ruth Sparks 1805; William Sparks, born 1805, died young; John C. Sparks, born 1807, Mary Sparks, born1808; William C. Sparks, born 1809; and Annie Sparks, born 1810. See the QUARTERLY of September, 1957, Vol.V, No. 3, p. 243 [Whole No. 19], for the sketch of Randall Sparks's life given by Mr. Lee. Mr. Lee made no mention of children by his second wife, but it will be noted above that the witnesses to Rebecca's application of 1850 stated that she had had children by Randall Sparks.)

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

REUBEN SPARKS born 1792, died 1848-49, son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks; resident of Boone County, Kentucky. ROSA or ROSANNA (WORLD or WORRELL) SPARKS, widow of Reuben. Bounty Land Warrant File 72 766-160-55

On April 27, 1857, Rosa Sparks, a resident of Boone County, Kentucky, appeared before a justice of the peace named John Alloway to make application for bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. She stated that she was 61 years old and that she was the widow of Reuben Sparks who had been a private in the company commanded by Capt. Hickman in the Kentucky regiment of volunteers, "or drafted men," commanded by Col. Dudley in the War of 1812. She stated that her husband had volunteered at Frankfort, Kentucky, in 1812 or 1813 for the term of 6 months and was honorably discharged at the end of his term. (Treasury Department records revealed that Reuben Sparks served in Capt. Pascal Hickman's company of Kentucky Militia from August 15, 1812, to March 5, 1813.)

She stated that she and Reuben Sparks had been married in Boone County, Ken-

***************
-651-

tucky, on December 29, 1836, by William Whitaker, "a preacher." She stated that her maiden name had been Rosa World. She stated that Reuben died "at home in Boone County, Ky., on the 28th day of February A.D. 1848-9 and that she is now a widow."  She asked that the warrant be mailed "to the care of J. P. Sparks, Owentown, Ky." She signed her name by mark. The witnesses to her signature were James N. Early and Joseph Hoffman, both residents of Boone County. Both stated that they were well acquainted with Reuben Sparks and Rosa Sparks and that they had lived together as husband and wife and that Reuben had died on February 28, 1848-9.

Along with her application, Rosa Sparks sent a statement she had obtained from I. G. Hamilton, Clerk of the County Court, to the effect that a record was on file that Reuben Sparks and Rosanna Worrell were married on December 29, 1836, by William Whitaker, a minister of the Gospel. Added to this statement is the following noted signed by J. P. Sparks, attorney for Rosa Sparks: "P.S. I have written her name in the declaration Rosa instead of Rosanna and World instead of Worrell as written in this certificate above."  Rosa Sparks was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: Reuben Sparks was a son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks and was born September 30, 1792, in Madison County, Virginia (See QUARTERLY of December, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, page 517. [Whole No. 32])  He moved with his parents to Owen County, Kentucky. When his father, Henry Sparks, made his will on August 23, 1827, he stated that he had earlier given Reuben 100 acres of land "where Samuel Horton formerly resided," but he left him also "50 acres of my farm where I now reside to include the field in the river bottom which is now enclosed with a stone fence and upland so as to make his 50 acres and if he should be without issue or never return (being at this time absent from the state) then and in that case the same is to be sold and equally divided between my three daughters."

Nothing has been learned regarding the descendants of Reuben and Rosa Sparks except that Mrs, Henry J. Miller a descendant of Reuben's brother, Madison Sparks, stated a number of years ago that Reuben had a son named Jordan Sparks who was a school mate of Abraham Lincoln. Perhaps this was the J. P. Sparks who acted as Rosa's attorney. On the 1850 census of Boone County, Rosa was listed as "Rosley Sparks," aged 55 and born in Virginia. She was then living with Julia Miller (aged 26) who may have been a daughter. The only other Sparks found on the 1850 census of Boone County was James Sparks, aged 16, living with Nancy Howell, aged 43. (See the QUARTERLY of March, 1957, Vol, V, No. 1, page 207. [Whole No. 17])

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

REUBEN H. SPARKS, born about 1777; died July 15, 1855; resident of Abingdon, Washington County Virginia; married. Sarah L. McClellan in Sullivan County, Tennessee, September 14, 1807; resident of Washington County, Tennessee, by 1850. Pension File WC 9 & BL Wt. 11 641-80-55.

On November 22, 1850, Reuben H. Sparks, a resident of Jonesborough, Washington County, Tennessee, appeared before a justice of the peace named W. H. Smith to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 73 years old; that he had been a private in the company know: as the "Bucktail Riflemen" commanded by Capt. Henry St. John Dixon in a regiment of Virginia volunteers commanded by Major Charles Fenton Mercer in the War of 1812; that he was first stationed at Major Nemin's (?) near Norfolk, later at Widow Collins near Norfolk, as a guard between the Bay Shore and Norfolk. He stated that he had volunteered at Abingdon, Washington County, Virginia, on March 8, 1814, for 3 months and was honorably discharged at the Widow Collins, near Norfolk, on July 5, 1814. He stated "that he has not seen his discharge for the last thirty years, having lost, or mislaid it."

***************
-652-

He signed his name as "Reuben H. Sparks ." Records in the Treasury Department proved that he had served as he had stated. He was issued a warrant (No. 8,484) for 40 acres of bounty land.

On April 6, 1854, Reuben H. Sparks, still a resident of Washington County, Tennessee, now aged 77, applied for additional bounty land under an act dated March 22, 1852. He stated he had volunteered in Abingdon, Virginia, on March 8, 1814, and that "he started from that place under Capt. H. St. John Dickson, under Cols. White & Preston, enrolled as a private in said company, marched in an 'organized form' from sd. place -- Abingdon to Norfolk, a distance of 400 miles, or thereabouts, ... & having served at Norfolk where he was mustered into service, the term of three months, he was then (at Norfolk) regularly and honorably discharged on the 5th of July 1814, as he has heretofore declared, a distance of 400 miles, as above stated, from Abingdon, Washington Co., Va., where he resided which would allow him within 3 days of four months actual service, and 40 days mileage, under the last recited act. He therefore claims an additional land warrant for 40 acres." He signed as "Reuben H. Sparks" before W. H. Smith, Justice of the Peace. He was issued Warrant No. 99,529 for 40 additional acres of bounty land.

On April 10, 1855, Reuben H. Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He was still a resident of Washington County, Tennessee, and gave his age as 78. He signed his name as "Reuben H. Sparks" and F. F. Wattenboyer and A. G. Graham, both of Washington County, signed as witnesses.

Reuben H. Sparks died shortly after making the above application and on August 21, 1855, his widow, Sarah L. Sparks, made application for the bounty land to which he was entitled under the act of March 3, 1855. She stated she was 66 years old and that she had married Reuben H. Sparks in Sullivan County, Tennessee, on September 14, 1807, by a Mr. Tipton, a justice of the peace, and that her name before marriage was Sarah L. McClellan. She stated that her husband had died on July 15, 1855. She signed her name as "Sarah L. Sparks"; Jeremiah Boyd and William R. Boyd, both residents of Jonesboro, Tennessee, signed as witnesses, stating that they had known Reuben and Sarah before Reuben's death, and that they had lived together as husband and wife. Sarah L. Sparks was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land.

On June 6, 1872, Sarah L. Sparks applied for a pension on the basis of her husband's service under the act of February 14, 1871. She was a resident of Washington County, Tennessee, and gave her age as 82. Since, under this act, a widow was required to provide proof of her marriage to a soldier of the War of 1812, Sarah stated that the record of her marriage in Sullivan County had been destroyed by the burning of the court house in 1863. She stated that she and Reuben H. Sparks had been married at Blountville, Sullivan County, Tennessee, on September 14, 1807, and along with her application she sent a sworn statement by W. S. Mahoney and John A.Wilds of Washington County that they had examined the family Bible of Mrs. Sparks and that it contained the entry: "Reuben H. Sparks and Sarah L. McClellan were married September 14th 1807."  She signed her application as "Sarah L. Sparks", Jas. A. Dillsworth and Jeremiah Boyd, residents of Jonesboro, signed as witnesses.

Apparently William A. Sparks, a son of Reuben and Sarah, wrote to his Congressman, W. G. Brownlow, asking that he testify to the marriage of his parents. Brownlow wrote to William A. Sparks from Knoxville on June 5, 1871, saying that he had "no doubt about the marriage of your father and mother, but am unable to testify on the subject. They were married in 1807 and I was born in 1805, and was therefore two years old."

The application of Sarah L. Sparks was approved on June 14, 1871, and a pension of $8.00 per month was approved dated from February 14, 1871. Sarah L. Sparks died on June 21, 1875.

***************
-653-

(Editor's Note: From the documents on the preceding pages, we know that Reuben H.Sparks was born about 1777. According to the 1850 census, he was born in Maryland and was a tailor by trade. At the time of the War of 1812, he was living in or near Abingdon, Washington County, Virginia. We know that he was married to Sarah L. McClellan (born about 1789) at Blountville, Tennessee, on September 14, 1807. (Blountville, Tennessee, is only about 20 miles from Abingdon, Virginia.) William Perry Johnson recently made a search of personal property tax lists of Washington County, Virginia, and found that the name of Reuben H. Sparks first appeared on the tax list of 1809, when he was taxed as one white poll over 16 years of age. The earliest census record for Washington County, Virginia, is that for l810--here Reuben H. Sparks was listed with two males, probably sons, under 10 years of age. He was also listed on the Washington County census of 1820 and 1830. About 1836 he moved from Washington County, Virginia, to Washington County, Tennessee, a distance of about 40 miles. There Reuben died in 1855 and his wife died in 1875.

From census records it appears that Reuben H. and Sarah L. Sparks had five sons and five daughters. Of the sons, the names of only three have been determined: William A. Sparks; James L. Sparks, born about 1814; and M. H. Sparks, born about 1833. The latter son, M.. H. Sparks, was still living at home in 1850 and was a printer. Three daughters were still living at home when the 1850 census was taken: Ann E. Sparks, born about 1810; Sophia Sparks, born about 1824; and Sarah P. Sparks, born about 1826.

James L. Sparks, son of Reuben H. Sparks, was married to Margaret Greer in Washington County, Tennessee, on October 18, 1836. According to the 1850 census, he was a printer. Listed on the 1850 census were five children of James L. and Margaret (Greer) Sparks:

                        Samuel G. Sparks, born about 1837.
                        Sarah H. Sparks, born about 1842.
                        Catherine R. Sparks, born about 1846.
                        James L. Sparks, born about 1847.
                        M.A . Sparks, born about 1848.)

                        (These abstracts of bounty land and pension papers will be
                        continued in future issues of the QUARTERLY.)

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

THE REAL FACTS ABOUT APPOMATTOX

(Editor's Note: The following from the pen of an anonymous author is quoted. for the amusement of our Southern branches of the Sparks family - - those who descend from the Northern branches, PLEASE DO NOT READ.)

After chasing the Union Army all over the map, even as far north as Gettysburg way up in Pennsylvania, the Confederates and General Lee were very, very tired. The Southern Army, camped out at Appomattox, was preparing to wipe out the Yankees the next morning, march victoriously into Washington and raise the Stars and Bars over the White House.

General Lee was resting at the Court House before mapping out the strategy for this final campaign. Into the Court House walked General Grant, ready to surrender. Grant was such an inconspicuous looking man that Lee took him to be his orderly. Naturally, Lee gave Grant his sword to polish. Grant, very surprised, took Lee's sword and actually thought that Lee had surrendered. He even thanked Lee for surrendering and General Lee, being a true Southern gentleman, couldn't go back on his word.

***************
-654-

RAY M. SPARKS CELEBRATES HIS 50th ANNIVERSARY IN THE MINISTRY

In the editor's note following the abstract of the bounty land application of Moses Sparks on page 643 of this issue of the QUARTERLY, acknowledgement is made of the assistance received from Ray M. Sparks, a great-grandson of Moses Sparks. We learned recently that on January 21, 1962, Ray M. Sparks celebrated his 50th anniversary in the ministry. For the occasion, he returned to the First Baptist Church of Talpa, Texas, where he was both licensed and ordained. As guest preacher for the occasion, the Rev. Mr. Sparks spoke on the topic "Principles Upon Which My Ministry Has Been Based."

The Rev. Ray M. Sparks is a resident of 2206 Junius St., San Angelo, Texas, having retired from the ministry at the First Baptist Church of Silver, Texas, in 1960. Licensed in Talpa on January 20, 1912, the year he finished high school, the Rev. Mr. Sparks entered Howard Payne College that autumn to study for the ministry. He was ordained in the Talpa church on May 27, 1914, and until his retirement served in maziy capacities as minister and teacher. He was graduated from Howard Payne College in 1927. Mr. Sparks was pastor of Hillcrest Baptist Church in San Angelo from December 1, 1945, to February 1, 1950. He was pastor of Ecla Baptist Church for more than two years before coming to San Angelo in 1945. He has also served as part-time pastor.of rural churches in Brow:, Coleman and Runnels Counties, Texas, and he taught school for fifteen years in those counties.

Ray M. Sparks was born seven miles west of Coleman, Texas, on October 21, 1893. He was a son of John Ramey and Mary Berta (Keeling) Sparks and a grandson of Richard and Emma (Bell) Sparks. Ray moved with his family to Talpa in 1904. He was married in February, 1915, to the former Miss Lillian Matthews, a native of Hamilton County, Texas. The Rev. and Mrs. Sparks have four children, all of whom live in San Angelo. They are: Mrs. A. M. Fuller, Mrs. Carroll Puckett, John M. Sparks, and Carl R. Sparks. They have thirteen grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

SPARKSES FOUND IN THE 1850 CENSUS OF DUTCHESS COUNTY, NEW YORK

By Carrie Grant Heppen

   Town of Pougkeepsie (enumerated July 19, 1850, by John S. Bogardens
(page 105)
274-365 Sparks, Geo.   31  (M) New York  Constable  $1800 
       "       Emely  25  (F)    "       "
     "       Edgar   1  (M)    "       "

 
274-366 Sparks, Joseph D   54  (M) New York  Mason   
       "       Ester  48  (F)    "       "
     "       Adelade  18  (F)    "       "
     "       David  22  (M)    "       " Clerk
     "       Geo.  16  (M)    "       "
     "       Seward  13   (M)    "       "
Dubois, Margaus  16  (M)    "       "
Butler, Catharine   9  (F) Ireland

   Town of Pougkeepsie (enumerated September 12, 1850, by John S. Bogardens)
(page 234)
1054-1333 Sparks, Maria   54   (F) New York     
       "       Martha  19  (F)    "       "
Brown, Catherine  22  (F)    "       "
     "       John   8  (M)    "       "
     "       Hellen   3  (F)    "       "

***************
-655-

SPARKSES FOUND IN THE 1850 CENSUS OF NIAGARA COUNTY, NEW YORK

by Carrie Grant Heppen

   Town of Cambia (enumerated September 31, 1850, by A. VanWagoner)
(page 593)
260-263 Tactur, Erastus   23   (M) New York     
       "      Betsy   22  (F)    "       "
     "      Ellen    1  (F)    "       "
Sparks, Thomas  14  (M)    "       "

   Town of Porter (enumerated August 2, 1850, by Wm. Henderson)
(page 896)
26-26 Hosmer, Timothy   66   (M) Connecticut  Farmer  $3200 
       "        Isabel   62  (F) New York
     "        Jane  24  (F)    "       "
     "        Larry   20  (M)    "       "
     "        Isabel  16  (F)    "       "
Willis, Samuel  20  (M)    "       " Farmer
Coggins, George  18  (M)    "       " Farmer
Briggs, Mary  14  (F)    "       "
Howell, Henry  10  (M) New Hampshire
Jewett, Ezekel  50  (M)    "       " Geologist
    "      Elizabeth  40  (F) New York
Sparks, Joe  13  (M)    "       "

 *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

SPARKSES FOUND IN THE 1850 CENSUS OF PONTOTOC COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

by Carrie Grant Heppen

   (Enumerated September 4, 1850, by Andrew J. Clark)
(page 129, Vol. 7)
166-166 Sparks, Thomas   35  (M) North Carolina  Farmer  $150 
       "       Jane  34  (F)      "          "
     "       Richard  12  (M) Alabama
     "       William   9  (M)       "
     "       Samuel   7  (M) Mississippi
     "       Joshua   3  (M)         "
     "       Sarah 11/12   (F)         "

 
167-167 Abernathy, S.  83   (M) North Carolina  Farmer   
         "          Ruth  71  (F)     "          "

 
168-168 Sparks, Peterson B.   44   (M) South Carolina  Farmer  $600 
       "       Isabella  30  (F) North Carolina
     "       Sarah  19  (F) Tennessee
     "       Duvall (Dred)  12  (M) Alabama
     "       Caroline  10  (F)      "
     "       Ruth    9  (F)      "
     "       Samuel   7  (M)      "
     "       William   5  (M) Mississippi
     "       Robert   3  (M)          "
     "       James 4/12  (M)          "

***************
-656-
 

SPARKSES FOUND IN THE 1850 CENSUS OF TISHOMINGO COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

by Carrie Grant Heppen

   (4th District, Northern Division; enumerated November 13, 1850 by Wm. Scruggs)
(page 139)
949-949 Sparks, Lewis  27   (M) North Carolina  Farmer  $250 
       "       Mary  24  (F) Tennessee
     "       Lewis   1  (M) Mississippi
     "       Jackson 3/12  (M)         "

   (Same; enumerated November 14, 1850, by Scruggs)
(page 142)
971-971 Sparks, Wm.  29   (M) North Carolina  Farmer  $800 
       "       Emilene  22  (F) Tennessee

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

SPARKSES FOUND IN THE 1850 CENSUS OF TRUMBULL COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

by Carrie Grant Heppen

   (District No. 143, Bloomfield; enumerated August 16, 1850, by Jacob H. Baldwin)
(page 536)
857-881 Sparks, Sylvester   29   (M) New York  Farmer  $300 
       "       Calista  22  (F)    "       "
     "       Celia   5  (F) Trumbull Co. Ohio
     "       Wilbur   2  (M)      "          "       "
     "       Pluma 6/12  (F)      "          "       "

   (District No. 143, Gustavus; enumerated September 11, 1850, by Jacob H. Baldwin)
(page 607)
1500-1552 Sparks, Amasa   35   (M) New York  Cheese Box Mkr   
       "       Lucy  30  (F)    "       "
     "       Eliza Ann  13  (F) Ohio
     "       Mellisssa   9  (F)   "
     "       Sopronia   9  (F)   " 
     "       Lorenzo   6  (M)   "
     "       Mary E.   4  (F)   "
     "       Lucinda   2  (F)   "

   (District No. 143, Warren: enumerated July 18, 1850, by James Hoyt)
(page 702)
2035-2115 Sparks, Erastus   30   (M) New York  Farmer  $1000
       "       Pluma  24  (F) Ohio
     "       Philemon   7  (M)    "
     "       Almira   4  (F)    "

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

From HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO, MARRIAGE RECORDS, 1808-1820, by Dickore and Thornburgh:

WILLIAM SPARKS and Jane Wiggins were married on October 14, 1819, by J. Quinn, Minister of the Gospel.

***************
-657-

THE LAST WILL OF ISAAC SPARKS (died 1834) OF HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO

(The following is a copy made from a photostat of the original will on file in Hamilton County, Ohio. Punctuation has been supplied and capitalization has been standardized for clarity, but the content and spelling has been copied exactly.)

Isaac Sparks, Senr., of Hamilton County, state of Ohio, being weak in body and in a declineing state of health for some time past, but of sound mind and memory, thanks be to God for it, do make this my last will and testamet in form as follows:

I will that my beloved wife have third of my real estate set off to her by three disintrested men, which shall be chosen one by my wife and one by my executors and the other by the two first chosen, whose duty is to lay off to her her third part in as equal a manner as the situation of the premises may admit, to be for my wife to live on and draw her support from during her natural life, after that to be sold and equally divided the money among my surviving children.

After the third has thus been laid off to my wife, the residue of the tract to sell for money with in one year after niy decease& I authorize my executors thus to do and sell to the best advantage in their power, and the money arising from the sale of the land and personal property that may be sold, not other ways disposed of, to be, after paying all debts, divided as follows:

I will Folly Seward, wife of Obadiah Seward, my second daughter, one Hundred & eighty dollars.

My third daughter, Rachel Long, one hundred & forty dollars.

Nancy Cock, my fourth daughter, two hundred twenty dollars.

I will Sally Legget, my fifth daughter, two hundred & twenty dollars.

I will my two grand daughters, Elizabeth & Harriet McCash, forty two dollars each.

William Sparks, my eldest son, having had his full share of my estate, yet extra of that I will him twenty dollars.

I will my grand son, Frank Sparks, fifty dollars.

I will my wife her share of my personal estate: two beds and beding and bedstead, the two best cows, the gray mare and carriage with harness, the corner cubbart with its contents, English cubbard, brakfast table, best stand and big Bible, six chairs, best looking glass, pair of best shovel & tongs, her carpets and the clock, and one hundred and fifty dollars in money.

The lot I have in Mount Pleasant I will to Eria Sparks, my grandson; if he does not survive, then to Martha Sparks, his sister. The lot of ground & house that I bought of James Hole I will to my son, Isaac Sparks.

Some few other articles I will to my wife not before mentioned: all the new bed quilts, the two brass kettles, dinner pot, stew kettle, tea kettle, three coffee pots, the knives and forks and vinegar hogshead. My executors will understand that not withstanding I have set off certain sums of money to my four daughters, yet my meaning and intention is that they all be paid equal sums, taking into consideration what they have received from me. I will that all moneys after all xpenses are paid, not otherways disposed of, shall be divided to my surviving daughters as above stated. I nominate my good friends and appoint James McCash and Steward McGill, Eqs., my executors.

I revoke all other wills & codasals by me made up to this date. I here unto set my hand and seal this fifteenth day of July 1834.

Witnesses:                                                                                                                 [Signed] Isaac Sparks (seal)
                            [signed] Reuben S. Compton
                                         Samuel Johson

(Editor's Note: Little is known at present of the family of Isaac Sparks whose will appears above. Since this will was written on July 15, 1834, and was filed on September 6, 1834, we know that Isaac Sparks died sometime between those two dates. We know that he was a resident of Hamilton County, Ohio, at least as early as 1798 for he was listed as a voter that year. Apparently he came from New Jersey because, according to the 1850 census, his daughter, Mary or Polly, was born in New Jersey about 1795. From his will, we know that Isaac Sparks had five daughters --the eldest was not named for she had died prior to 1834; apparently she had been married to a man named McCash (perhaps the James McCash whom Isaac named as an executor) and had left two daughters, Elizabeth and Harriet McCash.  The other four daughters were

***************
-658-

(2) Polly, nickname for Mary, who married Obadiah Seward; (3) Rachel, who married a man named Long; (4) Nancy, who married a man named Cock; and 5) Sally, who married a man named Legget. Isaac Sparks apparently had two sons: (1) William Sparks who was probably the William Sparks who married Jane Wiggins in Hamilton County on October 14, 1819; and (2) Isaac Sparks, Jr., born about 1805 who married Rebecca ----- and was still living in Hamilton County when the 1850 census was taken. The children of Isaac. Sparks, Jr., and his wife Rebecca, as listed on the census, were: (1) Alford Sparki, born about 1831; (2) Elizabeth Sparks, born about 1832; (3) Ermsley Sparks (female) born about 1834; (4) Sarah Sparks, born about 1842; (5) William Sparks, born about 1843; (6) Andrew Sparks, born about 1842; (7) Edward Sparks, born about 1847; and (8) Roda Sparks, born 1850.)

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

NEW MEMBERS OF THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION

It is a pleasure to report the names of forty new members of The Sparks Family Association. These are our new members thus far in 1962.
 

Akers, Mrs. Ada, 233 Coffman St., Longmont, Colorado.
Ansell, Mrs. Anna Lou, 3586 N.W. 41st St., Miami 42, Florida.
Arnall, W. F., Hartville, Missouri.
Babb, Mrs. Prisoillo Sparks, 417 Aliso Dr., S.E., Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Bailey, Mrs. Wayne, Big Springs, Nebraska.
Bates, Mrs. Doris Elizabeth Sparks, P.O. Box 6, Freeport, Grand Bahama Island.
Cross, Mrs. Leona Sparks, Box 439, 5150 4th St., N., St. Petersburg 3, Florida.
Hribal, Mrs. A. F., 1512 N. 12th St., Vincennes, Indiana.
Johnson, Mrs. Joy J., 4633 Tow:send St., Corpus Christi, Texas.
Johnston, Margaret Sparks, 327 A West Colter, Phoenix 13, Arizona.
Knoche, Louise, Rt. 1, Larned, Kansas.
Madison, Mrs. Effie D. 820 N. Clementine, Anaheim, California.
Payne, Mrs. Jean LaFay Sparks, 1510 Seton Ave., S.E., Decatur, Alabama.
Sparks, Mr. Allie Carl, 711 Valley Dr., Toccoa, Georgia.
Sparks, Ben F., Cor-Wick & Madison Streets, Corinth, Mississippi.
Sparks, Chesley Norris, 2615 Ridgeview Court, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Sparks, Claud Glenn, 1697-3 Cram Circle, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Sparks, E. L., Jr., 2608 Pleasant St., Hannibal, Missduri.
Sparks, Mrs. Gerald John, 1015 Redondo Ave., Manhattan Beach, California.
Sparks, Miss Izetta, Box 301, Frisco, Texas.
Sparks, James L., Box 4601, State Capitol Bldg., Lincoln 9, Nebraska.
Sparks, 1st Lt..Jerry Emerson, 2930 No. Cotner Blvd., Lincoln 7, Nebraska.
Sparks, John, R.F.D. 1, Norwood, Missouri.
Sparks, John Calhoun, 6146 N. loth Ave., Phoenix 13, Arizona.
Sparks, Lester L., 520 Franklin St., Huntsville, Alabama.
Sparks, Marilee, 212 No. 51st St., Fort Smith, Arkansas.
Sparks, Markle H., 28064 Ella Rd., Palos Verdes Estates, California.
Sparks, Miss Opal, 2119 Capers Ave., Nashville 12, Tennessee.
Sparks, Owen Leonard, 304 Sanders Rd., S.W., Huntsville, Alabama.
Sparks, Paul E., Box 230, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
Sparks, Reuben Albert, Box 356, Ellsworth, Kansas.
Sparks, Richard M., 53 Elm St., Wakefield, Massachusetts.
Sparks, Russell L., 835 Seward St., Evanston, Illinois.
Sparks, Steven D., 24 Bauer Place, Westport, Connecticut.
Sparks, Vernie Louis, 2745 Kausman St., San Diego 14, California.
Sparks, W. B., 1425 M St., Lincoln 8, Nebraska.
Sparks, W. C., 3511 Alpine St., S.W., Huntsville, Alabama.
Sparks, William Russell, 16 A Sidney Place, Brooklyn 1, New York.
Swaim, Mrs. Leora, P.O. Box 4054, Miami Beach 1, Florida.
Yeatts, Mrs. Mable Sparks, 1540 H St., Salida, Colorado.


***************


Index Next Page Previous Page Previous Whole No.

Scanned and Edited by James J. Sparks