THE
SPARKS QUARTERLY

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION

“He who careth not from whence he came, careth little whither he goeth.” Daniel Webster


VOL. IX, NO. 1  MARCH, 1961 
WHOLE NO. 33a

 
Index Next Page Previous Page Previous Whole No.

[Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

JARED SPARKS

1831

From a painting by SULLY

(View photograph)

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THE SPARKS QUARTERLY, published by The Sparks Family Association.

      Paul E. Sparks, President, 155 N Hite Ave., Louisville 6, Kentucky.
      William Perry Johnson, Historian-Genealogist, Box 531 Raleigh, North Carolina.
      Russell E. Bidlack, Secretary-Treasurer, 1709 Cherokee Rd., Ann Arbor, Michigan.

The Sparks Family Association was founded in March, 1953, as a non-profit organization devoted to the assembling of and preserving for posterity all genealogical and historical material pertaining to the Sparks family in America. Membership in the Association is open to all persons connected in any way with the Sparks family, whether by blood, marriage, or adoption, and especially to those interested in  genealogical and historical research. Membership falls into three classes: Active, Contributing, and Sustaining. Active membership dues are two dollars per year; Contributing membership dues are three dollars per year; Sustaining membership dues are any amount over three dollars. All members, whether Active, Contributing, or Sustaining, receive THE SPARKS QUARTERLY as it is published in March, June, September, and December. Libraries, genealogical and historical societies, and individuals may subscribe to the QUARTERLY without joining the Association at the rate of two dollars per year. Back issues are kept in print and are available for fifty cents per issue. The first issue of the QUARTERLY was published in March, 1953. The editor from March, 1953, to September, 1954, was Paul E. Sparks; since September, 1954, the editor has been Russell E. Bidlack. The QUARTERLY is printed at the Edwards Letter Shop, 711 N. University, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
 

JARED SPARKS (1789-1866)--A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

By Russell E. Bidlack

Of all the many thousands of persons named Sparks who have lived and died in the United States, the one whose name one meets most frequently in historical and literary works is that of Jared Sparks who was born May 10, 1789, and died March 14, 1866. Jared Sparks was born out of wedlock, the son of Eleanor Orcutt, daughter of Caleb Orcutt, a prosperous farmer of Willington, Connecticut. (Willington is a little town on the Willimantic River in Tolland County, Connecticut.) When Jared was seven months old, Eleanor married Joseph Sparks, a young farmer of Willington who had served in the American Revolution and whose pension papers, with a sketch of his family, appear in the present issue of the Quarterly.  Throughout his life, Jared went by the name “Jared Sparks,” and, according to tradition in the town of Willington, Joseph Sparks was actually Jared’s father.

At the age of six, Jared left the home of his parents to live with his mother’s childless sister, Chloe, and her husband, Ebenezer Eldridge. In 1800, he accompanied his aunt and uncle to their new home in Camden, New York. Herbert B. Adams, in his two-volume Life and Writings of Jared Sparks, (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1893), tells us that during part of this journey, which was made in the month of February, the boy “was put out of the sleigh by his thoughtless uncle, and told to ‘hold on behind.’ Overcome with numbness from cold, he fell off the runner, and was left unnoticed in the snow by the roadside, where he would have perished if he had not been rescued by another traveler, following in the track of the first, to whose careless keeping the lad was restored.”

In a letter which be wrote in 1817, Jared stated that it was his reading of Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography “which first roused my mental energies, such as they are, and directed them to nobler objects than they seemed destined by fortune and the facts

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to be engaged in.” As a mere child, Jared developed a strong interest in mathematics and astronomy, and in the public library at Willington there is preserved a wooden sphere with the countries of the World carved in the surface that was done by Jared Sparks when he was nine years old. His name is carved on the base. The site of his birthplace in Willington is marked and, according to Leon O.Woodwarth, a local historian, it has long been considered as one of the “sacred spots” of the town --”Jared Sparks being a very inspiring man of high ideals and a wide sphere of influence.”

From the time he was eleven until he was thirteen, Sparks attended school only two months each winter. In 1805, however, he returned to his parents’ home in Willington and attended a school kept by Oliver Holt. He learned so rapidly that Holt was soon forced to confess that he had taught the lad all he knew himself, and he was sent to a school in Tolland. There he quickly mastered all which that schoolmaster could offer.  In the winter of 1807-08, Sparks was hired by the selectmen of Tolland to teach the school himself for four months--at a salary of eight dollars per month. During the summer he worked as a carpenter and was able to get another school near Tolland for the next winter which paid him ten dollars per month. When he closed this school on February 17, 1809, be took an account of his property. Of the $122 which he had earned during the past thirteen months, he found he had spent but $50.59, and of that amount, $15 had been invested in books.

After closing his school in 1809, Jared began the study of algebra and Latin under the Rev. Hubbell Loomis, for whose instruction he paid the parish minister one dollar per week. Even here, young Sparks was able to earn part of his modest tuition--between lessons he shingled the parson’s barn. The Rev. Mr. Loomis was so favorably impressed by young Sparks that, through the assistance of the Rev. Abiel Abbot, he secured a scholarship for him at Phillips Exeter Academy to prepare him for college. In 1811, Jared entered Harvard. Although several years older than his classmates, and forced to earn his living while going to school, he was a social as well as a scholastic success, and he was graduated with high honors. From 1817 to 1819, he attended the Harvard Theological School while earning his living as a tutor in science at Harvard.

Upon receiving his master’s degree, Sparks became pastor of the First Independent Church (Unitarian) of Baltimore where he served from May, 1819, to April, 1823. He then accepted the position of Chaplain of the House of Representatives in Washington.  Here he served one year and closed his ministerial career.

In 1824, Jared Sparks turned his attention to the field of literature. He purchased the North American Review (on credit), and for the next six years served as the magazine’s editor. During that time he made it America’s leading literary periodical and sold it in 1830, realizing a profit of nearly $10,000. While editing the Review, Sparks lived in Boston, the cultural center of the United States, and soon became one of the town’s leading social and literary figures. His Life of John Ledyard, published in 1828, laid the foundation of his literary reputation.

Even before the publication of his biography of Ledyard, Sparks had begun the production which would bring him his greatest fame--his twelve-volume Writings of George Washington, which was published between 1834 and 1837. Sparks was the first person to be given access to the Washington papers. The first volume of this work comprised Sparks’s biography of Washington.

While working on the Washington papers, Sparks found time to write a three-volume biography of Gouverneur Morris and to begin the editing of two other large sets - - the ten-volume Works of Benjamin Franklin and the twenty-five-volume Library of American Biography.  Of the sixty lives included in the latter work, Sparks himself wrote seven.

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In 1839, Jared Sparks accepted a professorship of ancient and modern history at Harvard, the first such professorship created in any American university. A decade later, on February 1, 1849, he became the 18th president of Harvard. In his inaugural address, he attacked the elective system of studies then in vogue at Harvard. The changes which he introduced had wide influence, not only at Harvard but in other universities as
well.

Jared Sparks did not enjoy performing the administrative duties demanded of a university president, for they deprived him of the time which he was in the habit of devoting to research. He delegated much of his authority to a lower official. In 1853, he published his four-volume Correspondence of the American Revolution, and shortly thereafter he resigned the presidency of Harvard.

From 1853 until his death in 1866, Sparks lived quietly at Cambridge, enjoying the fame and fortune which his pen had brought him.  He collected a vast amount of material toward writing a history of the American Revolution, but this was a work which he never completed.

Jared Sparks is remembered today chiefly as an explorer in the field of American history. The fruits of his original and editorial labors amount to over one hundred volumes, and he succeeded, more than anyone else before him, in making Americans aware of their rich historical heritage. Modern historians think of Sparks as a member of the “old school” of history writers. Samuel Eliot Morison in writing of him for the Dictionary of American Biography (Vol. XVII, pp. 430-434), praised him as a pioneer in American historical investigation, but added: “Yet Sparks’s editorial methods were very bad; for he treated historical documents as if they had been articals or reviews submitted to the North American, using the editorial blue pencil freely. He made omissions without indicating them, standardized spelling and capitalization, and undertook to improve Washington’s English. . . . He approached history as a gentleman in the ‘era of good feeling,’ rather than as a scientific historian, resolved to tell the truth however unpalatable.”

Jared Sparks was married twice. On October 16, 1832, he was married to Frances Anne Allen, daughter of William Allen, Esq., of Hyde Park, New York. She died of consumption on July 12, 1835, leaving a daughter, Maria Verplank Sparks, who died of the same disease on January 3, 1846. On May 21, 1839, Jared Sparks was married, second, to Mary Crowninshield Silsbee, an heiress some twenty years his junior. She was the daughter of Senator Nathaniel Silsbee of Salem, Massachusetts. Five children were born of this latter marriage:

(1) Mary C. Sparks, born May 29, 1842; died June 25, 1842.
(2) Florence Sparks, born October 28, 1845; married November 16, 1876, Benjamin P. Moore.
(3) William Eliot Sparks, born October 23, 1847; died in 18.86; he married on January 20, 1874, Harriet A. Mason.
(4) Elizabeth W. Sparks, born May 1, 1849; married on March 9, 1876, Ed. C. Pickering.
(5) Beatrice Sparks, born March 26, 1851.
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SPARKSES IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

(Continued from Vol. V, No. 4, Whole No. 20, page 260)
 

JOSEPH SPARKS (1761-1826)

Compiled and Edited by Russell E. Bidlack

On May 2, 1818, Joseph Sparks, a resident of the town of Willington in Tolland County, Connecticut, applied for a pension based on his service during the Revolutionary War. In order to qualify for a pension under the law of 1818, a veteran not only had to prove that he had served in the War, but also that he was in real need of financial assistance. It was not required, however, that he give as much personal data as was necessary under later pension laws.

Joseph Sparks was born on February 3, 1761, in the town of Tolland--his birth was recorded on the Tolland Vital Records, Vol. 1, page 75. His parents, according to this birth record, were Joseph and Mehitable (Johnson) Sparks who had been married in Windham, Connecticut, on April 29, 1747. Mehitable was a daughter of Caleb Johnson. Joseph and Mehitable (Johnson) Sparks were the parents of the following children according to the Windham and Tolland Vital Records:

(1) Lernuel Sparks, born Sept. 11, 1747, in Windham.
(2) Melven Perlye Sparks, born Feb. 15, 1749/50, in Tolland.
(3) Elizabeth Sparks, born Nov. 2, 1751, in Tolland.
(4) Uriah Sparks, born April 17, 1752 cor 1753?,, in Tolland.
(5) Jeremiah Sparks, born Oct., 1757, in Tolland.
(6) Stephen Sparks, born Apr. 24, 1759, in Tolland.
(7) Joseph Sparks, born Feb. 3, 1761, in Tolland.
Joseph Sparks, son of Joseph and Mehitable (Johnson) Sparks, became a farmer in the town of Willington in Tolland County. On December 24, 1789, he was married to Eleanor Orcutt (see Willington Vital Records, Vol. B, p. 84), a daughter of a substantial farmer, Caleb Orcutt. Seven months prior to this marriage, on May 10, 1789, Eleanor Orcutt had given birth to a son who was destined to become a scholar and author  of international fame. In the baptismal records of the First Church of Willington, the minister wrote: “Jared, son of [     ] by Elinor Orcut July 1789,” but crossed out “son of” and wrote “born” in the blank space. (See New England Historical and Genealogical Register, April, 1913, p. 123.) According to tradition, Jared’s father was Joseph Sparks, whom his mother married when he was seven months old. He was always known as Jared Sparks. (See the preceding biographical sketch of Jared Sparks.)

Joseph Sparks died on January 26, 1826; his wife, Eleanor, died May 2, 1843. Joseph and Eleanor (Orcutt) Sparks were the parents of nine children in addition to Jared:

(1) Roxana Sparks, a daughter, born April 3, 1791. She was called “Rockey” on the Willington Vital Records. She died, unmarried, on November 11, 1857, in Willington.
(2) Parker Sparks, born July 15, 1793; died August 19, 1794.
(3) Daniel Sparks, born November 1, 1797. He was a resident of New York City in 1844. No further record.
(4) Pearl Sparks, a son, was born January 6, 1797. No further record.
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Children of Joseph and Eleanor (Orcutt) Sparks, continued:

(5) Origin Sparks, born June 23, 1800. He married Calista Converse of Willington on November 26, 1829, by Samuel S. Mallory. He died in Willington on April 2, 1852, and Calista died on July 28, 1898, at the age of 88 years. Our only record of children of this marriage is that of the burial records of the Willington Hill Old Cemetery.  There were probably other children besides the following:
(a) Maria L. Sparks, died March 29, 1851, aged 18 years.
(b) Caleb B. Sparks, born 1839, died October 3, 1852.
(c) Calonda M. Sparks, twin of Caleb B., died March 4, 1883, aged 44 years.
(6) Parker Sparks (second son by this name), born August 14, 1802; died July 9, 1806.
(7) Caleb Sparks, born February 3, 1804. He was a resident of Rutland, Poultney County, Vermont, in 1844.   No further record.
(8) Solymon Sparks, born March 15, 1807. He was married to Annis Holinan in Willington on April 14, 1833, by the Rev. Samuel S. Mallory (Willington Vital Records, Vol. D, p. 22). She was born August 20, 1810, in Union, Conn., a daughter of Rufus and Lucy (Eddy) Holman. Solyman Sparks died March 23, 1881; his wife, Annis, died March 31, 1884, in Vernon, Conn. Children:
(a) Seraph A. Sparks, born Nov. 7, 1838,. at Willington; married Andrew J. Culver.
(b) Philander Sparks, born May 20, 1841, at Willington; died Mar. 1, 1900.
(c) Lucy Elizabeth Sparks, born May 23, 1843; married in 1867 to James M. Coe; died at Richmond, Ind., on Feb. 27, 1910.
(d) Mary A. Sparks, born Nov. 11, 1845, at Rockville, Conn.; died May, 1889; she married Randall Keling.
(e) Ellen L. Sparks, born Nov. 12, 1847, at Willington; died Feb. 20, 1848.
(f) Dwight H. Sparks, born Sept. 27, 1849, at Rockville, Conn.; died June 2, 1852.
(9) Joseph Sparks, born June 24, 1809. A Joseph Sparks of New York married Mary Batty in Willington on October 13, 1833, but whether he was this Joseph Sparks or not is unknown. According to a statement of Origin Sparks made on January 2, 1844, Joseph Sparks was a resident of Willington at that time.
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TRANSCRIPTS OF DOCUMENTS IN THE PENSION FILE OF JOSEPH SPARKS

[Editor’s Note: In transcribing the following documents, care has been taken to copy exactly so far as spelling and capitalization are concerned; there has been some alteration in punctuation for the sake of clarity.]

Joseph Sparks of Willington in the County of Tolland in the State of Connecticut, a resident Citizan of the United States & now residing in sd Willington, aged 57, Testifies & declares on Oath, that in Feby A.D. 1777 he inlisted to serve as a soldier in the Continental Army in the revolutionary War the term of Three years in the Compy commanded by Capt Ichabod Hinckley of Tolland in Colonel Charles Webbs

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Regiment, being the 2nd in the Connect line of the Continental Army, and he joined sd Compy at Stamford in Connec in the Spring following & served therein against the common Enemy untill Feby A.D. 1780 when he was honourably discharged at Springfield in the State of New Jersey by a writing for that purpose by Hezekiah Hotridge [?], Lieut Colonel Commandt, but sd Discharge is lost & he verily believes is not now in existence. He also says that he was in several skirmishes with the enemy --and that he is now reduced in his Circumstances in life & stands in need of assistance from his Country for support.
        Tolland May 2nd 1818                                                                                 [signed] Joseph Sparks

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 Tolland County SS   [word illegible] May 2nd 1818

Personally appeared David Hinckley of Willington and made solemn oath that he served as a Serjeant in Capt Hinckleys Ccmpy & Col1 Webbs Regiment in the revolutionary War for three years & he knows that Joseph Sparks of sd Willington served as a soldier in the same  company, and that his Declaration on this paper is true. I also say that he was one of the best of Soldiers & always did his duty faithfully and further that he is poor, has a sickeley wife, & he is in need of assistance from his Country for support.
Before me
[signed] Sylvester Gilbert, Presiding Judge of  Cty Ct

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[Editor’s Note: On the basis of the above application, Joseph Sparks was granted a pension, but two years later, when he was required to list his possessions his pension was revoked--because be owned more property than the pension law permitted.]

STATE OF CONNECTICUT, County of Tolland 55. County Court, or Court of Common Pleas June Term 1820.

On this 28th day of June 1820, personally appeared in open Court, the same Court being a Court of record for said County, having the power of fine and imprisonment, Joseph Sparks aged 59 years, resident in Willington in the County of Tolland, who being first duly sworn according to law doth, on his oath, declare that he served in the Revolutionary War, as follows: to wit, three years as a private in a Company commanded by Capt Ichabod Hinckley, Col Charles Webbs Regt in the cont line as stated in his original declaration now on file in the office of the Secretary of War being dated the 2d day of May 1818 and that he has received a pension and now holds a pension Certificate No. 1248. [There follows a printed declaration that the declarant owns no property except that listed below.]

 Schedule [of personal property.]

 70 acres of land in Willington, old house & barn thereon worth
 per acre, 8.50 is __________________________________________________________________________595.00
 

2 oxen 48.00 1 Cow 16.00  1 yearling heifer 5.00 1 calf 3.00 73.00
1 horse 40.00 2 hogs .10.00 7 sheep & lambs 6.00 1 plow 2.00  18.00
1 chain 1.50 1 yoke 1.00 2 axes 1.25 1 hoe 17   3.92
1 horse 40.00 1 sythe .50 40.50
730.42
Household furniture    30.00
760.42

                                                                                                            [signed] Joseph Sparks

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[The following is a continuation of the preceding document.]

Occupation--a farmer, infirm and unable to labour but a very little--family, wife aged 53 years and has been under the care of a physician for 18 years and still is, and is now unable to do any kind of labour--4 children: a son named Origin aged 20 years--a daughter named Roxalana 28 years of age on hire--one son named Solimon aged 13 years, and a son named Joseph 11 years of age--and a daughter of Mr. Lyon 11 years of age. [Editor’s note: apparently by these “4 children” he meant those of his children still at home; who the “daughter of Mr. Lyon” was is not known.]

Debts owing:
 

Owing to Chester Carpenter  47.23 Owing to E--?--tical Society 25.00
Do. to Doot J. Palmer 16.00 Do. to Horace Vinton  7.00
Do. to Tho. Knowlton 6.36 Do. to Rev. Jared Sparks 40.00
Do. to Ebenr Rook 2.00 Do. to Doct. J. Palmer Jr 2.00
Do. to John Fuller  40.00 Do. to Roxalana Sparks  100.00
Do. to G. N. Merrick  2.00 Do. to Dammon Cushrnan  12.72
Do. to Elijah Merrick  5.82 Do. to Roswell Duenham  10.00
Do. to Liman Carpenter  3.60 196.72
123.01 123.01
319.73
Deduct 40.00
Amount 279.73

        Sworn to and declared by said Joseph Sparks on the 28 day of June 1820 before said Court, and it is the opinion of said Court that the total amount in value of the property exhibited in the aforesaid schedule is 760 dollars and 42 cents and that the declarant now owes 279 dollars 73 Cents and that his circumstances with  those of his family are as herein stated. [Elisha Stearns, Clerk of the County Court, added a certificate stating that the above was a true copy of the record of the court.]

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State of Connecticut/ SS
County of Tolland /

        On this eighth day of August AD 1838 personally appeared before the Court of Probate for the District of Tolland now in session in Willington within said district Eleanor Sparks a resident of said Willington in said County of Tolland, aged Seventy years, who being duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of congress passed July 7th AD 1838 entitled An act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows.

         That she is the widow of Joseph Sparks late of said Willington deceased, who according to her best knowledge and belief  was a soldier in the war of the revolution and performed service for a period of about three years according to her best knowledge & belief and subsequently received a pension under the act of Congress of 1818, which was afterwards suspended in consequence of his being the owner of a small amount of property. As to the best evidence of her claim she would refer the Commissioner to the declaration of her late husband & the papers connected therewith now in the pension office at Washington. As she was married to him subsequent to his rendering the service for which he was pensioned, and that she is unable to make a specific declaration as to the services he performed from her own personal knowledge, and she must rely solely on the testimony of others in support of those services: she relies on the fourth rule adopted by the department on the 17th of July 1838, requesting a reference to the papers now on file.

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        She further declares that she was married to the said Joseph Sparks at Willington aforesaid on the 24th day of December AD. 1789 and that her husband the said Joseph Sparks died on the 26th day of January 1826--and that she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service but that the marriage took place previous to the first day of January seventeen hundred and Ninety-four (viz) at the time above stated. And that she has ever since remained unmarried and is still a widow.

                                                                                                                            [signed] Eleanore Sparks

[Novatus Chapman, Judge of Probate, signed a statement following the above declaration to the effect that Eleanor Sparks had appeared and sworn as stated. The Town Clerk, Gideon N. Merick, also signed a statement to the effect that a record of the marriage of Joseph Sparks and Eleanor Oroutt was recorded on page 84 of Book B “for marriages births & deaths.”]

[On August 8, 1838, Oliver Holt, “of Willington County . . . aged Sixty three years residing near the Widow Eleanor Sparks,” swore that he had known Joseph Sparks over a period of  “several years” and that he had received a pension before his death. On March 15, 1839, Eleanor Sparks signed an application for a transfer of her pension; she stated that she had moved from Connecticut to New York City “to reside with her children.” On the same day she signed another statement to the effect that she had lived in New York City for “the space of six months past.” Also on March 15, 1839, Eleanor’s son, Daniel Sparks, resident of New York City, signed a statement to the effect that he “well knows her to be the identical person described in her affidavit and copy of her original certificate hereto annexed.”

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State of Connecticut/SS                                 Probate Court. District of Tolland, this 2d day of
Tolland County /                                                                   January AD. 1844.

        On this 2d day of January AD. 1844, personally appeared before the Court of Probate for the District of Tolland in the County of Tolland and State of Connecticut aforesaid in open Court, Origen Sparks of the town of Willington in said Tolland County aged forty three years, who first being duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the arrears of a pension due to Eleanor Sparks late of said town of Willington deceased under the provisions made by the Act of Congress, passed on the 3d day of March 1843, granting pensions to widows of persons who served during the Revolutionary War.

         That he the said Origen Sparks is the son of the said Eleanor Sparks decd and is the administrator on her estate duly appointed in all respects according to law. That the said Eleanor Sparks died at said town of Willington on the 24 day of May 1843, and was at the time of her decease the widow of Joseph Sparks of said town of Willington who was a soldier in the army of the Revolution and served therein as stated in an application of the said Eleanor Sparks made to obtain the benefits of the act of Congress passed July 7, 1838, and upon which application the said Eleanor Sparks obtained a pension certificate entitling her to receive the sum of Eighty Dollars per annum for five years to wit, from March 4th 1836 to March 4, 1841, and which said sum was paid her in accordance with the terms of said certificate, and that the said Eleanor is entitled to receive at the rate of Eighty Dollars per annum from the fourth of March 1843 to May 2, 1843, the time of her death. That the said Eleanor at the time of her death left the following named children, to wit,  Roxana Sparks, Origen Sparks, Solymon Sparks, and Joseph Sparks, all of said Willington and Daniel Sparks of the City and County of New York, & Caleb Sparks in the State of Vermont.
         Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year first above written - - in open Court.

                                                                                                                            [signed] Origin Sparks

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THE FAMILY OF JOHN SPARKS, BORN ABOUT 1780, OF MORGAN COUNTY, GEORGIA

By Russell E. Bidlack

In 1958, Mrs. Louise Maddin Earle, of 2200 Morrow Ave., Waco, Texas, sent the Association a copy of the family Bible record of the descendants of John Sparks, an early settler of Morgan County, Georgia. Shortly after sending this record, Mrs. Earle died. In her letter, Mrs. Earle explained that the Bible had once been the property of Henrietta Sparks Downs, daughter of John Sparks, and that it had been inherited by herself. The Bible record, as copied by Mrs. Earle, reads as follows:

                                Children of John Sparks and Sarah Tickle:

                                        Thomas Sparks, born October 6, 1801
                                        James Robert Sparks, born September 15, 1803
                                        John Henry Sparks, born May 15, 1806
                                        Henrietta Sparks, born July 28, 1808
                                        General Pinckney Sparks, born December 9, 1811
                                        Andrew Jackson Sparks, born February 23, 1815
                                        Mahala Bonner Sparks, born August 27, 1819

Little is known regarding John and Sarah (Tickel) Sparks. Assuming that they were married as young adults, we can guess that they were born about 1780. No records have been found which would indicate that John Sparks was related to Jeremiah Sparks who died in Morgan County in 1840, although they lived near each other. (See the Quarterly of December, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, pp. 518-25 [Whole No. 32].) Likewise, it is not known whether John Sparks was related to the David Sparks, born about 1794, who was living in Morgan County in 1814 when he volunteered for service in the War of 1812. (See the Quarterly of September, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, p. 501 [Whole No. 31].)

John Sparks lived in North Carolina before coming to Morgan County, Georgia. On the 1850 census, his son, Thomas Sparks, gave his own birthplace as North Carolina, and on the 1880 census John’s son, General Pinckney Sparks, gave his father’s (John’s) birthplace as North Carolina.

William Perry Johnson has done extensive searching among North Carolina records in an attempt to identify John Sparks. In 1790, Peter Tickel and John Tickel were listed on the census of Orange County, North Carolina, but there were no Sparks families in that county in 1790. (Both Peter Tickel and John Tickel died in Orange County, Peter in 1823 and John in 1822; neither named a daughter Sarah in his will.) Not far from Orange County, in Rockinghazn County, North Carolina, a John Sparks was listed on the 1810 census as follows:

                                        (page 18) John Sparks --- 2 males under 10 years
                                                                                     1 male between 26 and 45
                                                                                     2 females under 10 years
                                                                                     1 female between 16 and 26
                                                                                     1 female between 26 and 45

Although, from the Bible record, it would appear that in 1810 John Sparks had three sons (not two) under 10 years, and one daughter (not two) under 10, we know that errors were made so frequently in the enumeration of households, it seems probable that this John Sparks of Rockingham County, North Carolina, was the same John Sparks who appeared in Morgan County, Georgia, about 1816.

From land records, we know that John Sparks was a resident of Morgan County, Georgia, from about 1816 until about 1825. Following are brief abstracts of the deeds in Morgan County which pertain to John Sparks:

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            1816, Dec. 30. John Sparks from Jonathan Weaver, both of Morgan County, for $200, part of Lot 187, Dist. 5. Witnesses: Nipper Adams, Joseph Jones. (Book GG, p. 197)

            1817, Sept. 17. John Sparks of Morgan County to Jas. Young far $400, Lot 202, Dist. 5, drawn by Richard Wade. Witnesses: Harrison McLaren, John Henson, J.P. (Book G, p. 42)

            1817, Dec. 9. John Sparks to Davis Rollins, both of Morgan County, for $300, 50 acres of Lot 187, being the n.w. half of said Lot. Witnesses: Doster Perry, John Coggin. (Book GG, p. 196)

            1820, Feb. 2. John Sparks from Elijah Wheless, both of Morgan County, for $200, 34 acres on Apalachee River, adjoining said Sparks. Witnesses: John Coggin, James Lanear. (Book HH, p. 91)

            1824, June 4. John Sparks to Wm. K. Hawkins, f or $1000, Lots 478, Dist. 7, and 233, Dist. 8, in Appling County. Witnesses: J. Beall, Wiley White. (Book K, p. 623)

            1825, Jan. 13. John Sparks to Uriah E. Amons, 35 acres on Apalachee River, adjoining said Sparks. Witnesses: Harrison McClain, Jeremiah Beall (Book HH, p. 91)

Georgia military records indicate that John Sparks was a lieutenant in the Morgan County Militia from 1817 to 1822 and a captain from 1822 until 1825. His family was listed on the 1820 census of Morgan County, his age being given as between 26 and 45. In Georgia’ s Third Land Lottery, which was held in 1820, John Sparks of Morgan County drew lots in Appling County which he sold for $1000 in 1824 (see above deed).

After 1825, the name of John Sparks disappeared from Morgan County records, but whether he died at about that time or moved away, we do not know. He may have moved to Alabama from Morgan County as several of his children are known to have lived in the Lawrence County, Alabama, area in the 1830’s.

Following is the information which we have been able to gather regarding the children of John and Sarah (Tickel) Sparks:

(1) Thomas Sparks, born Oct. 6, 1801. He moved to Lawrence County, Ala., where he married JulinaNancy Jane McWhorter about 1835. He was a Justice of the Peace in Lawrence County during the 1840’s. Thomas and Julina (McWhorter) Sparks had the following children:

[Scanner's note:  Re correction above see Whole No. 187, p. 5222.]

(a) Almira Sparks, born about 1836. She married James Wallace.
(b) Thadeus P. Sparks, born about 1839, married Rebecca Shelton. They moved to Waco, Texas. On the 1880 census their children, ranging in age from 2 to 15 years, were listed as follows: Ida, Shelley, Fannie, Eugene,  Leon, Eddie, and Jessie (the latter a son).
(c) John Sparks, born about 1842. It is known that he had a daughter, Alice.
(d) Titus C. Sparks, born about 1844.
(e) Blanche Sparks, born about 1850.
(f) Cora Sparks, born about 1852.
(g) Thomas Sparks, born about 1860.
(2) James Robert Sparks, born Sept. 10, 1803. He was probably the James Sparks who married Rebecca Thompson in Lawrence County,  Ala., on March 20, 1834. It is known that he had a son named Augustus Sparks, born Feb. 14, 1837, in Blouns Springs, Ala., died April 2, 1888. Augustus (Gus) Sparks married
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about 1865 in Waco, Texas, Henrietta McConn, who was born Nov. 8, 1837, in Aberdeen, Miss. Augustus Sparks was living in McLennan County, Texas, in 1880 and at that time had children named Fannie, Jonnie, and Jessie, It is known that Fannie (Frances) was born in Waco on July 24, 1869, and married her cousin, John Wesley Downs, on Oct. 2, 1889.

[Scanner's note:  See SQ p. 2992 for the following plus additional information concerning James Robert and Susan (Harbin) Sparks:]

Anita V. Sparks Eakin of 501 Sunhaven Dr. , San Antonio, Texas (78239), reports that she now has proof that the James Sparks who married Rebecca Thompson in 1834 in Lawrence County, Alabama, was not the James Robert Sparks born in 1803. She has found proof that James Robert Sparks (born 1803) was married to Susan Harbin in Hall County, Georgia, on April 5, 1829.

(3) John Henry Sparks, born May 15, 1806. No further record.
(4) Henrietta Sparks, born July 28, 1808. She married William Wood Downs on Aug. 10, 1823, “at church on Sunday at 11 A.M. by Rev. Rob. Green, Salem, Ga.” William Wood Downs was a son of William and Sarah (Downs) Downs and was born in Fairfax County, N.C., near Weldon, on Aug. 12, 1802. In 1836 they moved to Leighton,  Ala., and in 1854 to Waco, Texas. They both died in Waco, Henrietta on April 27, 1886, and her husband on Sept.  22, 1882. They were the parents of 13 children, one of whom, John Wesley Downs, married his cousin, Fannie Sparks, granddaughter of James Robert Sparks.

(5) General Pinckney Sparks, born Dec. 2, 1811, died at the age of 84. He was named for General Thomas Pinckney,  hero of the Revolution. He married Rhoda Eliza McWhorter in Lawrence County, Ala., on July 30, 1835. They had one daughter named Eliza.  Rhoda died, and in 1848 G. P. Sparks married, as his second wife, Georgia Ann Maxwell in Mississippi. By his second wife, G. P. Sparks had six children:

(a) Henry Clay Sparks, born Sept. 6, 1849, in Kemper County, Miss.
(b) William Pinckney Sparks, born April 5, 1852, in Lowndes County, Miss.,died in 1901. He married Victoria Aglenline Bumgardner  in Waco, Texas, on Sept. 20, 1877. Children:
(1) Marianna Sparks, born July 17, 1879;
(2) Ala Alex Sparks, born Nov. 14, 1880;
(3) Medora Alms Sparks, born April 2, 1883;
(4) William P. Sparks, born Jan. 14, 1887; and
(5) Thomas Earl Sparks, born Sept. 28, 1889.
(c) Medora Henrietta Sparks, born Feb. 23, 1855, in Chocktaw Co., Miss.
(d) Thomas Calvin Sparks, born July 23, 1859, in Chocktaw Co., Miss.
(e) Elizabeth Ann Sparks, born Nov. 6, 1862, in Choctaw Co., Miss.
(f)  Alice Alvira Sparks, born April 25, 1869, in Limestone Co., Texas.
(6) Andrew Jackson Sparks, born Feb. 23, 1815. He married Amanda Melvina Daniel on Nov. 26, 1845, in Sumter  County, Ala. David M. Backstrom was bondsman and A. Smith, M.G., performed the marriage. Ainanda was the daughter of Islmm and Polly (Smith) Daniel;  she was the granddaughter of David and Magdaline (Lewis) Daniel and of Samuel and Temperance Smith. No further record.
(7) Mahala Bonner Sparks, born Aug. 27, 1819. She married a Mr. King. No further  record.
 * * * * * * * * * * * * *

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812

BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

 (Continued from page 530)


 
JAMES SPARKS, of Jonesville, Lee County, Virginia; died 1816. Bounty Land Warrant File 27 446-160-12.

The earliest document in this file is a letter dated Jan, 27, 1846, written by A. Truxnbo, a Congressman from Kentucky, to the Pension Office asking “whether the name

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of James Sparks is found upon the Muster Rolls of 1812 or 1813. He served under Capt. Henry, was a citizen of Jonesville, Lee County, Virginia, at the time he went into the service. He died in the service & his heirs want to get his bounty land if they are entitled to it.”

The Treasury Department found proof of the service of James Sparks--he enlisted on July 28, 1812, for 5 years as a private in Capt. Archer’s Company of Artillery and “he served honestly & faithfully to 17 July 1816 when he died.” This record also states that the pay to which James Sparks was entitled when he died was paid to S. C. Wooldridge, the administrator of his estate.

On June 8, 1846, at a court held in Carter County, Kentucky, “satisfactory evidence was adduced in court, to prove that James Sparks enlisted under Captain Henry [sic] about the 1st of July 1812 at Jonesville, Virginia, for the term of five years and that he has left this country & been absent for many years and reported to be dead and that Ephraim Sparks, Jesse Sparks, William Sparks, Solomon Sparks, Nancy Sparks, and Lela Sparks (also one Rebecca Sparks, a half sister) are the Brothers and Sisters and the only heirs at law in fee to said James Sparks.” 160 acres of bounty land were granted to these heirs of James Sparks.

(Editor’s note: We have been gathering material on the Lee County, Va., Sparks family and hope to be able to publish a detailed record in the Quarterly. Should any member of the Association trace his ancestry to Lee County, or the adjoining county of Washington, please get in touch with the editor.)
 
JAMES SPARKS of Bowdoinham, Maine, born about 1795. Bounty Land Warrant File 8 946-160-55.

In March (day of month omitted) 1855, James Sparks appeared before David I. Wright, a Justice of the Peace of the town of Pendernham and made application far bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was 60 years old and was a resident of the town of Bowdoinham, Sagadahoc County, Maine. He swore that he was the identical James Sparks who was a soldier in Capt. Joseph Dustin’s company in Col, C. Thomas’ Regiment of Maine Militia, and that he served from Sept. 1 to Oct. 10, 1814. He signed his name on the application as “James Sparks.” The witnesses to this application were James Woodworth and T. M. Quinnam.

War Department records proved that James Sparks had served in the Maine Militia from June 27 to July 11, 1814, a total of 15 days. A warrant for 160 acres of land was issued to James Sparks on Oct. 24, 1855.
 
JAMES SPARKS born between 1780 and 1795; enlisted in 1812 at Rookingham Court House, Richmond County, N.C.;  married in Anson County, N.C., in 1818; resident of Lexington County, S.C., in 1871.

On May 22, 1871, James Sparks made application for a pension under the act of Feb. 14, 1871. He declared that he was a resident of Lexington County, South Carolina; that he was married, having married Nancy Huggins in Anson County, North Carolina, in October, 1818. He swore that he was the identical James Sparks who had enlisted and served in the Regular Service of the U.S. as a private in Capt. Sanders Donahue’s company of the Second Regiment of Artillery in the War of 1812. He stated that he had enlisted at Rockingham Court House in North Carolina on or about July 25, 1812, for 5 years and was honorably discharged at Fort Scott, Alabama, on or about July 25, 1817. He stated that he had received a bounty land warrant for 160 acres. He added that he had been under the command of Maj. Forney and Col. Wilborn and was< stationed on Fort Moultries Island at Charleston “& during my term of Service

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assisted in building Fort Scott--General Pinckney Commanding.” He signed his application by mark before R. Harmon, Deputy, Trial Justice Court, Lexington County. The witnesses to his signature by mark were John K. Kneece and Lodwick Hartley, both of whom signed their full names.

On Oct. 24, 1871, the Adjutant General’s Office reported that records proved that James Sparks had enlisted on July 25, 1812, in North Carolina, for 5 years and had been assigned to the U.S. Artillery Corps. “He is reported enlisted by Lieut. Dearing - - served in Captains S. Donahue’s and Archers’ Companies and Present June 30, 1817. No further information.”

James Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month on Jan. 31, 1872. Nothing in this file reveals the date of death of James Sparks nor is  there any record of the bounty land which he stated he had received.

(Editor’s Note: The above James Sparks was probably a son of James and Sarah (Lynch) Sparks who were residents of Anson County, N.C., during the early 1800’s. The elder James Sparks was a son of Charles Sparks who had been born in the mid -1700’s in Spotsylvania County, Virginia.)

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

JAMES SPARKS born about 1791, died July 23, 1851; enlisted in Jefferson County, Kentucky, died in Marion County, Missouri. Bounty Land Warrant File 11 820-160-55.

On Feb. 5, 1851, James Sparks of Marion County, Missouri, appeared before William P. C Harrison, Mayor of the city of Hannibal, Mo., and made a sworn statement in application for bounty land. James Sparks stated that he was 61 years and 6 months of age (thus born about 1791) and was a resident of Marion County, Mo. He swore that he was the identical James Sparks who was a private in Capt. Samuel Kelly’s company in the 8th Regiment of Kentucky commanded by Col. Callaway in the War of 1812. He stated that he had volunteered at Jefferson County, Kentucky, on or about Aug. 1, 1813, for 6 months and continued in service for 4 months and was discharged at Jefferson County, Kentucky, on or about Dec. 5, 1813. He further stated “that he received a written discharge . . . and put the same in the possession of one John Schrader supposing him to be entitled thereto by reason of the fact that he affiant supplied his said Schrader’s place in said Company,” and that he did not know what had become of said Schrader.  He sigued his name as “James Sparks.” War Department records proved that James Sparks had served as he stated, from Aug. 26 to Nov. 9, 1813.

Another document, also dated Feb. 5, 1851, signed by James Sparks, appointed Ferdinand W. Risque of Washington, D.C., his lawful attorney.

On Jan. 6,1852, a land warrant for 40 acres was issued to James Sparks (No. 36-581) but by the time it was received, James Sparks had died.

On April 15, 1854, Braxton Gilbert of Marion County, Mo., appeared before the clerk of the Hannibal Court of Common Pleas and declared that he was the guardian of Franklin Sparks, the only minor child of James Sparks who had died on July 23, 1851. The warrant which had been received after James’s death was returned, and it was requested that a new warrant be issued to Franklin Sparks. Braxton Gilbert stated that Franklin Sparks was about 18 years of age. Accompanying this application was a copy of the court record which had appointed Braxton Gilbert the guardian of Franklin Sparks dated Oct. 3, 1853.

A warrant for bounty land was issued to Franklin Sparks on April 23, 1854 (No. 58-749) far 40 acres. When the new law of 1855 became effective, Gilbert returned Franklin Sparks’ s warrant far 40 acres and was able to get a warrant for 160 acres in its place, (No. 11820).

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(Editor’s Note: The above James Sparks is believed to have been living in Louisville, Ky., in 1825. He was in Marion County, Mo., by 1831--on April 30, 1831, he purchased 25 acres of land in Marion County from Jos. and Polly Hanner, and on the same day he and his wife, Nancy, sold the same 25 acres, along with an 80 acre tract, to William Robertson. Descendants believe that James’s wife’s maiden name was Nancy (or Anna) Kennet, and that she was a daughter of Joshua Kennet. She died before 1840. It is believed that James and Nancy (Kennet) Sparks had the following children, perhaps others:

(1) Miranda Sparks, born about 1817, married Braxton Gilbert.
(2) John Wesley Sparks, married May 22, 1845, in Marion County, Mo., Margaret Minor.
(3) Hester Sparks, married William Benjamin Davis.
(4) Catherine Sparks, married May 1, 1845, in Hannibal, Mo., William Minor.
(5) Elizabeth Sparks, born 1825 at Louisville, Ky., married William McRae in Hannibal, Mo.
(6) William Samuel Sparks, married Oct. 31, 1844, in Marion Co., Mo., Clarissa Jane Lee.
(7) Franklin Sparks, born about 1836, married Lydia
 * * * * * * * * * * * * *

AN OPEN LETTER FROM MAJ. SMITH TO THE MEMBERS OF THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION

Homage to a noble ancestry once denied
Is love and gratitude crucified;
The substance of self and selfishness
Impotent--self glorified.
A bold legacy of family lore survives
While wealth squandered never revives.
What are we as members of The Sparks Family Association doing to perpetuate the legacy left us by a noble ancestry? Join me in perpetuating  and increasing our membership--and leaving a living legacy worthy of those responsible for our being. Except for the past, there would be no today--no tomorrow--no present--no future. “Today” is the most important day in our lives. The past has gone, the future has not been born. What are we of The Sparks Family Association going to do “Today,” for the future, in honor of the past? We can at least renew our memberships and each invite another “Sparks” to join us, or present a membership to an eligible friend. “Where there is a will there is a way.” We have the “way”--but have we the “will”? Many of us have children and grandchildren who should be initiated into our fold, and taught early the significance of their origins; together with the privilege afforded them to “honor” their forebears. Pride, dignified, instills self-respect. It is not a chimera. Personally, it is my conviction that we, as members, owe greater allegiance to our Association, and greater encouragement and indications of appreciation to President Paul E. Sparks and our Secretary-Treasurer Editor Russell E. Bidlack. To them we concede the credit far what has been done, and to them we look for our future existence. Honor to whom honor is due. This I submit at the age of 88 years and nine months, together with my regret that it “may be later than I think,” and my working days nearing the “vanishing point.” In the meantime, “carry on” with me--and continue to “carry on” in memory of those entitled to your homage.
Fraternally,
[signed] Charles H. Smith


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SPARKS FAMILIES LISTED ON THE 1840 CENSUS OF TENNESSEE

Compiled by Carrie Grant Heppen

(Editor’s Note: In previous issues of the Quarterly, we have acknowledged the Association’s indebtedness to Carrie Grant Heppen of Washington, D.C., for her many contributions to the Sparks family’s genealogy. Mrs. Heppen is a professional genealogist who takes a real interest in her work. For several years she has watched constantly for the Sparks name while working on other families, and she has copied many important records for us. Recently she searched the entire 1840 census of Tennessee for another name and, as always.  She also watched for the name Sparks. In her usual humble manner, Mrs. Heppen has expressed fear that she may not have noticed all the Sparks entries, but your editor doubts that she missed any.

In the September, 1955, issue of the Quarterly, we published a record compiled by William Perry Johnson of the Sparks families listed on the 1820 and 1830 census record of Tennessee. In 1830, twenty-seven different Sparks families were living in fifteen Tennessee counties. In 1840, there were thirty-eight different Sparks families living in twenty-four Tennessee counties.

In all federal census records prior to 1850, only the name of the head of each household was given. Opnosite each name, the members of the household, including the head, were enumerated by sex and age group. In the 1840 census, males and females were divided into thirteen age categories. We may assume that in most households, the man listed as the head of that household was the oldest male enumerated and that the oldest female enumerated was his wife, but one cannot always be sure. (If the head of the household was a woman, i.e. Sinthy Sparks in Bledsoe County, we may assume she was the oldest female listed.) Likewise, those members of the household younger than the head were usually his children, but in some instances apprentices, orphaned neighbor children, and relatives were enumerated as members of the household. On the 1840 census, male and female slaves were enumerated, but not in age groups. The page number of the volume in which the name appears is given in the following record opposite each name.)

Tennessee - 1840 Census


Males . Females
 .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
Anderson County .  .  .
Hiram Sparks (10)  .   . .

 
Bledsoe County  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . .   . .
James Sparks (154)  . .   . .
Sinthy Sparks (160) . .   . .

 
Blount County  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . .  . .
Abraham Sparks(84)  .   . .
James Sparks (122) .   . .
William Sparks (122)  .   . .

 
Bradley County  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . . .  . .
Abijah Sparks (36)  .   . .

 
Carroll County  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . .  . .
Isaac Sparks, Sr.(18)  .   . .
Isaac Sparks, Jr. (18) .   . 2 .

Slaves Male  3 Female  4

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Tennessee - 1840 Census (continued)


. Males . Females
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
Coffee County  . . .   . .
Thomas Sparks(153)  1 .   . .
Mathew Sparks(156)  .   . .

 
Claiborne County  .   . .
James Sparks (216)  .   . .

 
Franklin County   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . .  .  .  .  .  . .
Solomon Sparks (42)  .   . .
Jonathan Sparks (42)                    .              

 
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
Gibson County  .   . .
Samuel Sparks (190)  .   . .

 
Grainger County  .   . .
Geo W Sparks (112)  .   . .

 
Hamilton County   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . .   . . .
W. G. Sparks (153)  .   . .
James Sparks (178)  . .   . 1 .

 
 
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
Hardeman County  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . . .  . .
David Sparks (315)  .   . . .
David Sparks Sr. (316)   . .   . .

 
Haywood County   .  . . .   . .
Elijah Sparks (379)  .   . .

Slaves Male  1  Female  2
Henderson County .   . .
Samuel Sparks (364)  .   . .

 
 .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
Henry County   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . .  . .
George W Sparks 153 .   . .

 
Hickman County                            .                        
Isaiah H. Sparks (190)   .  . .   . .
James Sparks (192) 1 . .   . .
Jesse Sparks (195)  .   . .
Slaves Male  2 Female

 
Meigs County   . .   . . .
Stephen Sparks(229)  .   . .

 
 .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
Perry County  .   . .
Samuel Sparks (155)  . .   . .
Slaves Male  7 Female  9

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Tennessee - 1840 Census (continued)


. Males . Females
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
Roane County  . .   . .
William Sparks (59)                      .                    

 
Rutherford County .   . . .
Edmond Sparks (110)   . .   . .
Willis Sparks (120)  .   . .
Edmund Sparks (121)  .   . .

 
Shelby County  .   . .
Jonas Sparks (309)  . .   .  .  .  . .

 
Washington County  .  .  . . .   . .
James L. Sparks (208)   . .   . .

 
 .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
  .
0
5
5
10
10
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
+
100
White County  .  .  . . .   .  . .
Michael Sparks (35)  .   . .
William Sparks (85)  .   . 1  .  .  .  . .

 
Wilson County  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . .  .  .  . .
Nathan Sparks (309)   . .   .  . .
Jesse H Sparks(309)  .   . .

 * * * * * * * * * * * * *

PAUL E. SPARKS ASSUMES NEW POST

Since the publication of the last issue of the Quarterly, our President, Dr. Paul E. Sparks, has received an important advancement in his professional career. On December 15, 1960, he was promoted to Assistant Superintendent for General Instruction in the Louisville, Kentucky, public school system.

Paul began his teaching career in his home town, Yatesville, Kentucky. He went to Louisville in 1935 as a teacher at Western Junior High School and by 1939 had advanced to the position of Principal of Emmet Field School in the same city. During World War II, he served as a captain in the Army Air Force. He returned to the Louisville school system following the war and in 1959 became Director of Pupil Personnel. Paul holds a bachelor’s degree fran Morehead College, a master’s from Northwestern University, and a doctor of education degree from Indiana University.

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Scanned and Edited by James J. Sparks