THE
SPARKS QUARTERLY
THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION

"To forget one's ancestors is to be a brook without a source, a tree without a root."
(An old Chinese proverb.)


VOL. XLII, NO. 2 JUNE 1994 WHOLE NO. 166a

 
Index  Next Page  Previous Page  Previous Issue

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[Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

HIGHWAY MARKER

COMANCHE COUNTY, TEXAS

(Texas Historical Commission)

(View photograph)

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THE SPARKS QUARTERLY, published by the Sparks F amily Association
John J. Carmichael, Jr., President, 3408 N. Rosewood Ave., Muncie, Indiana (47304-2025)

A. Harold Sparks, Vice President, 500 1st St., N., #303, Newton, Iowa  (502087-3104)
 

Russell E. Bidlack, Secretary-Treasurer & Editor, 1709 Cherokee Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan (48104-4448)
The Sparks Family Association was founded in March 1953 as a non-profit organization devoted to assembling and preserving genealogical and historical materials pertaining to the Sparks Family In America.  It is exempt from federal tax under the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, Sec- tion 503(c)(7).  Membership in the Association is open to all persons connected with the Sparks Family, whether by blood, marriage, or adoption, and to persons interested in genealogical research.  Membership falls into three classes:  Active, Contributing, and Sustaining.  Active Membership dues are $10.00 per year;  Contributing Membership dues are $15.00 per year; and Sustaining Membership dues are any amount over $15.00 that the member wishes to contribute for the support of the Association.  All members receive The Sparks Quarterly as it is published in March, June, September, and December.  Back issues are kept in print and are available for $3.00 each to members of the Association and for $4.00 each to non-members. The first issue of the Quarterly was published in March 1953. Eight quinquennial indexes have been published for the years 1953-57; 1958-62; 1963-67; 1968-72; 1973-77; 1978-82; 1983-87; 1988-92; and 1993-97.  Each index is available for $5.00. 

A complete file of all back issues of the Quarterly (1953-1993), including the eight indexes, may be purchased for $360.00.  The forty-seven years of the Quarterly (1953-1993) comprise a total of 5634 pages of Sparks Family history. The nine indexes (1953-97) amount to over 900 additional pages.  An Index for 1998-2002 will be published in 2003.  A table of contents is also available for $5.00.  Comprising 72 pages, this lists the articles and collections of data appearing in the QUARTERLY between 1953 and 2000.  It is updated at the end of each year.  The International Standard Serial Number that has been assigned to the Quarterly is ISSN 0561-5445.

Orders for individual back issues of the Quarterly, and the table of contents, as well as a complete file should be sent to the editor, Russell E. Bidlack, 1709 Cherokee Rd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48104-4448.  His telephone number is 734-662-5080;  he has no E-mail address.

TEXAS HONORS FANNY (SPARKS) BROWN

We are always pleased (and proud) to learn of any honors that are given to persons named Sparks or to Sparks descendants. We learned that the Texas Historical Commission erected a highway marker in Comanche County last year (1993) to honor Frances Sparks Brown for her devoted community service during the later 1800s. The inscription on the marker, which has been reproduced on the cover of this issue of the QUARTERLY, reads as follows:

FRANCES MARIE SPARKS BROWN

(October 17, 1849 - January 1, 1934)

Frances Marie Sparks, a native of North Carolina and daughter of Daniel and Kezziah Sparks, married Thomas Brown in 1865. They lived in Grayson County, Texas, before moving to a 410-acre farm near here about 1876. During the 1880s and 1890s Frances served as a midwife and lay doctor for families in the area. Known as "Aunt Fanny" she often rode 6-8 miles by horseback at night to deliver a baby. Despite her husband's death in 1912, Frances skillfully managed her farm and reared 12 children while continuing to nurse many of her neighbors back to health.
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TEXAS HONORS FANNY (SPARKS) BROWN, coninued:

A record of the family of Fanny (Sparks) Brown was part of an article published in the March 1988 issue of THE SPARKS QUARTERLY [Whole No. 141] on pages 3202-3204.  A picture of her and her husband, Thomas Brown, appeared on page 3203.  At the time this article was published, descendants believed that her given names were Mary Frances; apparently they were Frances Marie.

We are also pleased when we are able to make corrections in articles we have published in earlier issues of the QUARTERLY.  The article containing information about Fanny (Sparks) Brown (who was honored by the Texas Historical Commission) also contained incorrect and incomplete information about her brother, William
J. Sparks.  Here is the "new" information as it has been sent to us.  Our readers are asked to make the necessary changes to Item c, on page 32033202 of the QUARTERLY.

[Scanning editor's note:  Reference made in original article.]

Front row, left to right: Daniel Sparks, Lillie Sparks, and Lucy "Kitt" (Brannock) Sparks, holding Thomas Sparks.
Back row, left to right: Enis Sparks, Verna Sparks, Stella Sparks, and James W. Sparks.

(View photograph)

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TEXAS HONORS FANNY (SPARKS) BROWN, continued:

[Editor's Note: We are indebted to Association members Veleta (Sparks) Johnson and Gladys (Sparks) Wilson for furnishing the information and photographs used in this article.]

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CARLIN - SPARKS FAMILY CEMETERY NEAR BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

By William H. Gumprecht

[Editor's Note: At least eighteen articles have been published in various issues of THE SPARKS QUARTERLY about Josiah and Penelope (Brown) Sparks of early Baltimore County, Maryland, and their descendants.  They were the parents of five sons and one daughter.  One of the sons, Josiah Sparks, Jr., born about 1752, was married to Rachel Collett about 1773.  They lived in Baltimore County for most of their lives.  Rachel died there in 1818 and Josiah died there in 1846.  They were buried in the Carlin-Sparks Cemetery which is located about fifteen miles north of the city of Baltimore.

[The following account is about a visit to the Carlin-Sparks Cemetery in 1985 made by a great-great-great-great-grandson of Josiah and Rachel (Collett) Sparks.  He is William H. Gumprecht of 2606 Stephenson Drive, Wilmington, Delaware (19808).  He welcomes correspondence with other persons who are also interested in this branch of the Sparks family.]

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CARLIN-SPARKS FAMILY CEMETERY NEAR BALTIMORE, MD, continued:

This small plot is located in a cornfield on the Marshall farm about 0.6 mile west of Maryland State Road 562 (Troyer Road) just south of the intersection with Sheppard Road.  The plot is wooded, covered with underbrush and briars, and very uneven because of groundhog burrows.  It is surrounded by a partially-erect iron fence with an opening on the west side. The graves are arranged by family groups, but not in rows.  As indicated, many of the gravestones have fallen and some are broken, but their inscriptions are generally quite legible.  The inscriptions given below are listed chronologically, beginning with the earliest date of death.  The slash [/] following a word or phrase denotes the end of a line on the tombstone and the beginning of a line below it.

[Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

WILLIAM CARLIN GRAVESTONE IN THE CARLIN-SPARKS CEMETERY

(Photograph taken in December 1985)

(View photograph)

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CARLIN-SPARKS FAMILY CEMETERY NEAR BALTIMORE, MD, continued:

[Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

ELIZABETH (SPARKS) CARLIN GRAVESTONE

IN CEMETERY NEAR BLACK HORSE, MD

(This stone was buried under about an inch of dirt in 1985)

In addition to the stones noted above, there are also three footstones marked with the initials: "W.C.," "R.C.," and "W.P." All of these stones are broken.

There are also three unmarked stones: (1) one near the west entrance; (2) one near the Ruth Pearce stone; and (3) one in back of the Sarah Mayes stone.

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 CARLIN-SPARKS FAMILY CEMETERY NEAR BALTIMORE, MD, continued:

The visit to the Carlin-Sparks Cemetery also affords me an opportunity to give the connection of the Carlin family with the Sparks family.  Rachel Elizabeth Sparks, daughter of Josiah and Rachel (Collett) Sparks, was married to William Carlin on March 19, 1802, in Baltimore County.  He had been born about 1774 in France and was an adopted son of James and Elizabeth (Clendenin) Carlin, early settlers of Delaware, but who went later to Harford County, Maryland.

William Carlin (nee Guilliame Santee) came to the colonies as a small boy, probably as a stowaway, along with a friend or relative who wanted to escape religious persecution.  The Carlins took a liking to the young man and adopted him.

James Carlin, adoptive father of William Carlin, died on March 22, 1827, at the age of 99.  He and his wife, Elizabeth, were buried in a church cemetery in Harford County, Maryland.  A few years before his death, he made a will to which he added a codicil shortly before his death.  He treated his daughter-in-law, Rachel Elizabeth (Sparks) Carlin, very well, leaving her "two feather beds, furniture, and the use of his negro girl, Sally, and her issue."  All of his notes and bonds were to be equally divided with her sons, James, Josiah, Aaron, William, and Thomas Carlin, but she was also to receive $500 above her equal share of the estate.  Also named as beneficiaries were her daughters, Ruth and Rachel Carlin.  Aaron Sparks of Baltimore County was named as the executor, but his name was withdrawn in the codicil.

The relationship between William Carlin and his adoptive father, James Carlin, apparently soured over time, since James's will stated that, "In consiquence [sic] of William Carlin being disposed to waste my estate and rendering it less useful for his children, and frequently treating me personally in a very unbecoming manner, I will to him, the said William Carlin, the sum of twenty dollars and no more."

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SOME ADDITIONAL MARRIAGE RECORDS OF PERSONS NAMED SPARKS

RECORDED IN QUEEN ANNES COUNTY, MARYLAND

Pages 4183-4188 of the September 1993 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 163, contain a compilation of the marriages of persons named Sparks in Queen Annes County, Maryland, during the period ca. 775 - ca.1875.  The compilation was based upon records from several different sources, and it was not intended to be thought of as complete.

Recently, a member of the Association, Peter G. Thyrre, 3 Chester St., Ardsley, New York, 10502, sent us a list of nearly three dozen additional marriages of persons named Sparks in Queen Annes County during this same period of time.  In the main, these additional names were taken from "Queen Annes County, Maryland, Marriage Licenses, 1817-1858" compiled by Raymond B. and Sara Seth Clark, 1963.  We are pleased to add these names to the earlier list.
 

Date Person Named  Sparks Spouse  Remarks
Nov. 3, 1818
 

 

John
 

 

Mary Meredith
 

 

Married by Rev. Sparkes;May be the couple on theearlier list as: ca.1818, John P. & Mary, and as:ca.1819, John & Mary
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ADDITIONAL SPARKS MARRIAGE RECORDS, QUEEN ANNES CO., MD, continued:
 
Date 
Person Named Sparks
Spouse
Remarks
May 28, 1828  Elizabeth Ann  John Hewitt  Married by Rev. Clements; 
See below: Elizabeth Ann 
(Sparks) Hewitt, Apr. 5, 1851 
Aug. 1, 1829  Alley  James Lucas  Married by Rev. Iluff 
Mar. 29, 1830  Catherine  James Godwin  Married by Rev. Clements 
Sept. 11, 1831  Mary  Edward Wright  Married by Rev. Connelly 
Jan. 5, 1834 
Mary 
Samuel Potts 
Married by Rev. Turner 
Apr. 30, 1834 
Jane 
David Lindsay 
Married by Rev. Greenbank 
June 8, 1837 
Nancy 
William Potts 
Married by Rev. Turner 
Jan. 16, 1839 
Louisa 
Henry Bryan 
Married by Rev. Baine 
Jan. 22, 1839 
Alle(y) Ann B. 
James Fisher 
Married by Rev. Hambleton 
Dec. 21, 1839 
Martha A. 
James Elliott 
Married by Rev. Bell 
Sept. 17, 1840 
Mary 
John McFarland 
Oct. 10, 1840 
Sarah Ann 
Wm. Causden 
(Cosden)
Married by Rev. Williams 
Feb. 4, 1841 
Ann 
Thomas Clements 
Married by Rev. Williams 
May 6, 1843 
Rachel 
Robt. Mer(e)dith 
Married by Rev. Allen 
Dec. 23, 1843 
Mary 
Henry Green 
Married by Rev. Crane 
Nov. 11, 1846 
Mary 
Jacob Seth 
Married by Rev. Harman 
Jan. 6, 1847 
Rebecca 
Joel West 
Married by Rev. Clements 
Jan. 31, 1848 
Mary 
John Stevens 
Married by Rev. Wilson 
Sept. 6, 1850 
Rebecca 
William Jones 
Married by Rev. Clements 
Apr. 5, 1851 Elizabeth Ann
Sparks) Hewitt 
Edward Walls  Married by Rev. Crane 
May 19, 1851  Mary E.  Frederick Comelius Married by Rev. Bell 
Married by Rev.Bell  Mary A.E. James H. Lewis  Married by Rev. Southerland
May 7, 1852  Henrietta  Thomas Hendrix  Married by Rev. Crane 
July 21, 1853  Ester Elizabeth  Alexander Holland  Married by Rev. Clements 
May 2, 1854  Martha A. James Pinkfield  Married by Rev. England 
Dec. 21, 1854  Sarah E. Samuel R. Sinnett  Married by Rev. England
May 26, 1857  Louisa  William I Stevens  Married by Rev. Jordan 
July 1, 1857  Frances A. James H. Bills  Married by Rev. Clements 

 
The following additional Sparks marriage is found in Portrait & Biographical Record of The Eastern Shore of Maryland , 1898, published by the Chapman Publishing Company. Page 11 (#51)
 
ca. 1814 
Sarah 
Gen. Richard Thomas
She was born near Centerville, where her father, Rev. Robert  Sparks, an early Methodist minister in this area, owned an estate. 
 

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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS

OF PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA

By Paul E. Sparks

[Editor's Note: The first part of an article about William and Kesiah Sparks and their descendants was published in the THE SPARKS QUARTERLY of June 1993, Whole No. 162, pp. 4109-27.  Here we present the second and concluding part.]

C.  William Sparks, Jr., son of William and Kesiah (---------- ) Sparks, was born on March 10, 1762, in Prince William County, Virginia.  He was married to Mary ["Polly"] Robertson on August 15, 1795, in Frederick County, Virginia.  She had been born in August 1769.  She and William went to Kentucky about 1805 with William's brothers, James Sparks and Thomas Sparks, where they settled on Coopers Run in northern Bourbon County.  When the 1810 census was taken, they were shown as having eight children in their household, five boys and three girls.

In 1819, William Sparks moved to a 286-acre farm on Townsend Creek in Harrison County, Kentucky.  He had purchased the tract on January 4, 1819, from Laban Ship for $2,864.  When the 1820 census was taken, he was shown as head of a household in Harrison County.  It was there that he and his wife, Polly, died in 1824. Their deaths were only three days apart.  He died on August 9th, and Polly died on August 12th.

On October 6, 1828, Ann (Sparks) Batterton and her husband, Henry, residents of Putnam County, Indiana, sold her undivided share of her father's farm to her brother, Harrison Sparks, and to her sister, Nancy Sparks, for $381.  A few months later, on April 14, 1829, Mary ["Polly"] (Sparks) Hannah and her husband, Joseph Hannah, sold her one-ninth part of the farm of her father to her brother, Harrison Sparks, and to Hugh Correll, for
$350.

At its June 1829 term, the Harrison County Court commissioned Harrison Sparks to act for the other heirs of William Sparks in disposing of William's farm at a public sale.  Named in the court order as children of William Sparks were:  Harrison Sparks, Nancy Sparks, James Sparks, Thomas Sparks, William Sparks, Mitton Sparks, Simeon Sparks, and Ann (Sparks) Batterton.  (Mary ["Polly"] (Sparks) Hannah had already disposed of her share.)  Joseph Shawhan was the successful buyer with a bid of $13.27 per acre.

According to probate records, William and Mary ["Polly"] (Robertson) Sparks had nine children, all of whom lived to maturity.

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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS, continued:

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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS, continued:

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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS, continued:

Thomas W. Sparks, continued
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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS, continued:

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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS, continued:
 

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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS, continued:
 

(Thomas Spaencer Sparks, continued)
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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS, continued:
 

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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS, continued:

By 1860, Simeon Sparks was in Sangamon County, Illinois, in the house hold of his niece, Mary E. (Sparks) Lanham.  (See Item 6, a, above.)  He continued to live with the Lanham family and was listed with them on the 1880 census of Sangamon County.  We have found no further record pertaining to him.


D. Nancy Sparks, daughter of William and Keziah (---------- ) Sparks, was born about 1768 in Prince William County, Virginia.  She was married to a man named Wingate when her father made his will in March 1787.  Her father bequeathed her only one shilling by his will; he may have already given her a share of his estate as a wedding present.  We have found no further record of her.

E. Thomas Sparks, son of William and Keziah (----------- ) Sparks, was born about 1770 for he was still underage when his father made his will in March 1787.  His father left him 31 pounds to be "put to interest until he comes of age."  Thomas was married to Catherine Claypoole on November 23, 1804, in Fauquier County, Virginia.  She had been born about 1785 in Virginia.

Thomas accompanied his brothers to Kentucky about 1805 where he settled in Bourbon County. When the 1810 census was taken of Bourbon County, for some reason he was not enumerated as the head of his household;  instead, his wife, Catherine, was listed as the head.  (Perhaps Thomas had a health problem which prevented him from assuming the role of the head of his family.)  Living in Catherine's household was a male aged under 10 years; a female also aged under 10 years; two males between 10 and 16 years, and one male aged between 26 and 45.

Thomas Sparks died about 1812 in Bourbon County, and an inventory was taken of his personal property on March 13, 1812.  The appraisers were John Edwards, William Hutchison, and Luke Henson.  Catherine Sparks, widow of Thomas, and James Sparks, his brother, were appointed as co-administrators.  Among the items listed in the inventory were six slaves valued at $1250.  The property was sold at a public auction in April 1812.

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SOME DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM AND KESIAH SPARKS, continued:

Catherine Sparks, widow of Thomas Sparks, was listed again as head of her household when the 1820 census was taken of Bourbon County.  With her was one son and one daughter, both born between 1800 and 1810, and a son born between 1810 and 1820.  Shortly afterwards, Catherine moved her family to adjacent Harrison County where she died during the summer of 1828.  Her son, John Sparks, was appointed administrator of her estate, which was appraised on September 25, 1828, by Joseph Shawhan, Joel Frazer, and Joseph Patterson.  Among the items listed in the inventory were seven female slaves valued at $945.  The entire estate was appraised at $1595.

Coincidental to the settlement of the estate of Catherine Sparks, the final settlement of her husband's estate was made just one week earlier, on September 17, 1828, in Bourbon County.  Among the items charged to the estate of Thomas Sparks was one for "clothing and schooling three children for 16 years at $23 each year for a total charge of $1104."  The Bourbon County Court accepted the settlement by James Sparks, administrator.

At the October 1828 term of the Harrison County Court, Sally Sparks and James Sparks, infant orphans of Thomas Sparks, chose John Lail as their guardian.  Then, at the January 1830 term of the Harrison County Court, the estate of Catherine Sparks, widow of Thomas Sparks, was finally settled.  Named as her heirs were John Sparks, Sarah Sparks, and James Sparks.

After the settlements of the estates of their parents, Sarah Sparks and James Sparks went to Monroe County, Missouri.  Their brother, John Sparks, probably remained in Harrison County, Kentucky, until about 1848, and then, he, too, went to Monroe County.

[Editor's Note: This completes the two-part article devoted to William and Kesiah (----------- ) Sparks and their descendants.  Obviously, there are other data which we have not found and which should be added to this record in future issues of the QUARTERLY.  Descendants and other interested persons are invited to send us any data and corrections that they may have to supplement what has been presented.]

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Scanned and edited by Harold E. Sparks