THE
SPARKS QUARTERLY
THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION

"To forget one's ancestors is to be a brook without a source, a tree without a root."
(An old Chinese proverb.)


VOL. XLII, NO. 1 MARCH 1994 WHOLE NO. 165a

 
Index  Next Page  Previous Page  Previous Issue

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[Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]
 

MARION JACKSON ["BUDDY"] & CAROLINE LUTICIA (LIGHTFOOT) SPARKS

PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN AT THE TIME OF THEIR GOLDEN WEDDING

1937

(View photograph)

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THE SPARKS QUARTERLY, published by the Sparks Family Association
John J. Carmichael, Jr., President, 3408 N. Rosewood Ave., Muncie, Indiana (47304-2025)

A. Harold Sparks, Vice President, 500 1st St., N., #303, Newton, Iowa  (502087-3104)

Russell E. Bidlack, Secretary-Treasurer & Editor, 1709 Cherokee Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan (48104-4448)
 

The Sparks Family Association was founded in March 1953 as a non-profit organization devoted to assembling and preserving genealogical and historical materials pertaining to the Sparks Family In America.  It is exempt from federal tax under the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, Section 503(c)(7).  Membership in the Association is open to all persons connected with the Sparks Family, whether by blood, marriage, or adoption, and to persons interested in genealogical research.  Membership falls into three classes:  Active, Contributing, and Sustaining.  Active Membership dues are $10.00 per year;  Contributing Membership dues are $15.00 per year; and Sustaining Membership dues are any amount over $15.00 that the member wishes to contribute for the support of the Association.  All members receive The Sparks Quarterly as it is published in March, June, September, and December.  Back issues are kept in print and are available for $3.00 each to members of the Association and for $4.00 each to non-members. The first issue of the Quarterly was published in March 1953. Eight quinquennial indexes have been published for the years 1953-57; 1958-62; 1963-67; 1968-72; 1973-77; 1978-82; 1983-87; 1988-92; and 1993-97.  Each index is available for $5.00. 

A complete file of all back issues of the Quarterly (1953-1993), including the nine indexes, may be purchased for $360.00.  The forty-nine years of the Quarterly (1953-1993) comprise a total of 5634 pages of Sparks Family history. The nine indexes (1953-97) amount to over 900 additional pages.  An Index for 1998-2002 will be published in 2003.  A table of contents is also available for $5.00.  Comprising 72 pages, this lists the articles and collections of data appearing in the QUARTERLY between 1953 and 2000.  It is updated at the end of each year.  The International Standard Serial Number that has been assigned to the Quarterly is ISSN 0561-5445.

Orders for individual back issues of the Quarterly, and the table of contents, as well as a complete file should be sent to the editor, Russell E. Bidlack, 1709 Cherokee Rd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48104-4448.  His telephone number is 734-662-5080;  he has no E-mail address.

A CONTINUATION OF THE DESCENDANTS OF

EDWARD AND ELIZABETH SPARKS

By B. J. Sparks

[Editor's Note: In THE SPARKS QUARTERLY of September 1989, Whole No. 147, pp. 3438-3458, we provided information on a number of descendants of Edward Sparks, who was born prior to 1750.   Edward Sparks had moved from Maryland to Pittsylvania County, Virginia , prior to February 1, 1781, on which date he obtained a Virginia land grant there.   By the following year, however, he had moved to Fluvanna County, Virginia, where he died prior to March 1786, leaving a widow named Elizabeth and three minor children named Jeremiah, James, and Nancy;  by 1802, these three children of Edward and Elizabeth Sparks were living near their Sparks relatives in Franklin County, Georgia.  There, Jeremiah was called "Jeremiah Sparks, Jr." because he had an older cousin also named Jeremiah.

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Editor's Note, continued

[Jeremiah Sparks, Jr., who was born in or about 1773, was married to Nancy and in or about 1817 they moved with their family to Gwinnett County,  Georgia.  A son of Jeremiah and Nancy was Henry S. Sparks, born April 22, 1804;  he was married on November 5, 1829, to Martha Osborn 1807-1864).  Before 1840, Henry S. Sparks moved with family members to Walker County, Georgia, then (before 1850) to Cherokee County, Alabama.  In 1851 or 1852, they moved to Pike County, Arkansas.  It was there that both Henry and Martha died in 1864.  See pp. 3448-58.  A son of Henry S. and Martha (Osborn) Sparks was William Erwin Sparks, born September 10, 1831;  he was married in 1854 to Bede Caroline Osborn, in Clarke County, Arkansas.  Their only son was Marion Jackson "Buddy" Sparks.

A grandson of Marion Jackson "Buddy" Sparks is B. J. Sparks, Jr., 16727 58th Place, West, Lynnwood, Washington, 98037. He has prepared the following record of his grandparents and their descendants, which continues item 3 on page 3451.]

Marion Jackson "Buddy" Sparks was born in Amity, Pike County, Arkansas, on February 25, 1859, and died on December 5, 1943.  Caroline Luticia Lightfoot, daughter of William Henry Lightfoot and Mary Ann Childers, was born in Amity, Arkansas, on September 1, 1868, she died on June 5, 1959.  They were both buried in the Memorial Cemetery at Victoria, Texas, as were children named William Alma, May Belle, and Marion Jackson, Jr.

Marion Jackson Sparks and Caroline Luticia Lightfoot were married in Clark County, Arkansas, on January 16, 1887.  [The author has the original marriage license in his possession; it is reproduced on the following page, slightly reduced.]  They moved from Arkansas to the Choctaw Nation in Oklahoma soon after their marriage.  Here Marion farmed for a while, and children named William Alma, Mary Lafada (died young), and Frederick Clarence were born.  Following is a letter that Caroline wrote to her uncle, John Alexander Lightfoot, in Amity, Arkansas.  The spelling has not been changed from the original copy.

Choctaw Indian Nation 1893

Dear Uncle and Ant

I will write you a few lines in answer to yours  Was Glad to hear from you but have neglected to write  We are all up  I ant feeling well this eving  I have got the headache  The baby not feeling verry well  She is cutting teeth.  Rile's folks [Riley Osborn, brother-in-law] is all well but the baby.  Isabelle has weaned him.  Well Aunt Susan how is grandma  We got a letter from Victory [her sister]  she said youans wanted to take grand-ma down their  It looks like they could take her.  ant susan I hate for you to hae the care of hur and you shoulden  If I lived in reach of grandma Budy [Marion J. Sparks, Sr.] said if you would come out hear he would rusel the money for you to come on and I will take care of you as same as I will my baby.  It nearly kills me to thin I cant be with you  When I was at home God noes I would now  Gran ma if you could stant to go to Arkadelphia you could come all writ [right]  There is only one change and the conductors will tend to you  If you think you cant stand it I am going to write to Robert and Victory [R. W. Johnson and wife, Victoria] and see if they wont take you if we will help them  Becky [Marion J. Sparks's sister] said you neded a pair of shoes  I will send you the money as soon as we get out the cotton to get the money  Uncle John if there cant be no way fixed to help you take care of her remember there is one that never will forget you and if it is ever so I can help you I will gladly do it  Pa [Wm. Henry Lightfoot, Sr.] hant got no money he hant bin out a dollar for what he has eat since he has bin here


(Continued on page 4241)

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[Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

Marriage License of Marion J. Sparks and Caroline Luticia Lightfoot

(View photograph)

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DESCENDANTS OF EDWARD AND ELIZABETH SPARKS, continued:

(Letter of Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, 1893, continued:)

If so I dont know it  Uncle I want you to write soon and let me know if grama thinks she can come   If I had money I would come to hur but it looks like it takes all we can rase to keep the table up and work like negroes  I will close write soon  your niece
C Sparks
Tell granma to say a few words for me
The baby mentioned would be Lafada, who died in 1899 at an early age.

Marion Jackson Sparks (the author's grandfather) moved to Fannin County, Texas, about 1895.  He then ran a freight line from Honey Grove, Texas, into the Choc taw Nation of Oklahoma.  In 1906, the family moved to Clovis, New Mexico, the same area where Johnella Boynton's family located (see the September 1984 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 127, page 2644).  This was at a place called Blacktower, New Mexico.  The gate to Cannon Air Force Base is where the depot was at the time of their stay in New Mexico.  The author went to the place where they homesteaded.  It is now one of the nicest farms around that area.  The family stayed there until 1909 and then went by wagon to Anson, Texas.  The reason they left was that there was no firewood (still no trees as of 1992) and drought; they hauled water two miles in barrels.  Then in 1911, they moved to Victoria, Texas.  In 1917, they moved into a new house near Victoria.  The house is still being lived in, and is the house where the author was born.  Then, around 1933, they gave up the farm and began living with their children.  We all liked to have Grandpa and Grandma visit our family as that became fishing time.  He dearly loved to fish.  Not to catch anything, but to just be around kids and take a nap every so often.  The photograph appearing on the cover of this issue of the QUARTERLY was taken in 1937 when Grandpa and Grandma had their 50th wedding anniversary.

Grandpa passed away while the author was in the Air Force during World War II.  I only wish I had started genealogy while my grandparents were alive.  Then things would have been simple, as they both had sharp memories until they passed away.

Marion Jackson Sparks and wife, Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, had nine children. One baby girl died young, but the others lived long lives.

A.  William Alma Sparks, son of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, was born January 13, 1888, and died July 26, 1912.  William Alma never married and died from an accidental gunshot wound.

B.  Mary Lafada Victoria Sparks, daughter of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, was born September 4, 1890; she died July 12, 1899.

C.  Clarence Fredrick Sparks, son of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Light- foot) Sparks, was born on April 7, 1892, and died on October 28, 1971.  He was married to Jessie McCurry on June 28, 1919. They had three babies that died young.

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DESCENDANTS OF EDWARD AND ELIZABETH SPARKS, continued:


D.  May Belle Sparks, daughter of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, was born on May 8, 1885, and died on January 9, 1981.  She was married to Gus J. Ball on October 14, 1914, at Victoria, Texas.

1. Alvin Wesley Ball, born September 15, 1915, died June 19, 1985

2. Orvill Marion Ball, born September 20, 1917.

3. Gus J. Ball, Jr., born June 8, 1921.

E.  Bonham John Sparks, Sr., son of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, was born on November 11, 1898, died June 13, 1971.  He was married to Alma Hattie Maxey on June 25, 1920.
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DESCENDANTS OF EDWARD AND ELIZABETH SPARKS, continued:

Children of Bonham John Sparks, Sr., continued:

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DESCENDANTS OF EDWARD AND ELIZABETH SPARKS, continued:

F. Myrtle Sparks, daughter of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, was born on April 11, 1900, at Honey Grove, Texas.  She died in 1983 at Rosenberg, Texas.  She was married on December 22, 1920, to Monroe F. Davis who had been born on August 30, 1896.

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DESCENDANTS OF EDWARD AND ELIZABETH SPARKS, continued:

G. Caddar Isabell Sparks, daughter of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, was born on November 11, 1902, and died on March 18, 1989.  She was married to William A. Tipton, Sr. at Victoria, Texas, in 1921.

H. Paralee Gertrude Sparks, daughter of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, was born on March 28, 1905, at Fannin, Texas.  She was married to Vena 0. Stevens on October 26, 1921, at Victoria, Texas. l.Marion Jackson Sparks, Jr., son of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, was born on July 8, 1907, at Clovis, New Mexico, and died on July 17, 1987, at Victoria, Texas.  He was married in 1930 to Addie Vee Thomas, who had been born on September 10, 1910. J. Virgil Lee Sparks, son of Marion Jackson and Caroline Luticia (Lightfoot) Sparks, was born on March 12, 1912, at Victoria, Texas.  He was married (1st) to Grace Long, who was born on April 8, 1912.  On December 13, 1938, he was married (2nd) to Lillian Ida Wagner, who was born on April 13, 1921.
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DESCENDANTS OF EDWARD AND ELIZABETH SPARKS, continued:

Children of Virgil Lee Sparks, continued:

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

CORRECTION

On page 4023 of the December 1992 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 160, in the listing of the children of Jesse Franklin and Elizabeth Manilla (Dempsey) Clark, we were uncertain of the full name of the wife of their son, John Quincy Adams Clark (1863-1937). A granddaughter, Jeane Clark Stone, tells us that her full name was Frances Lou Jeane Bannister.

[Scanning editor's note:  Correction made.]

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DENNIS McFRANKLIN AND JULIA ANN (McCOY) SPARKS

OF CLAY COUNTY, ALABAMA

Dennis McFranklin Sparks was born on November 18, 1847, in Carroll County, Georgia.  He was a son of Uriah and Sarah (Whatley) Sparks.  His mother died, probably late in the summer of 1850, leaving her husband with seven children, ranging in age from seventeen years down to a few months.  Uriah Sparks moved his family to Talladega County, Alabama, (just about fifty miles due west) in 1857.  It was there that he was married to Mrs. Mahala (Browning) Coleman in 1859.  It was his third marriage.  He died in 1863.

Dennis Sparks was a twelve-year-old boy when his father re-married.  Descendants say that neither he nor his nine-year-old sister, Nancy, liked their step mother, and, in particular, they thought that their stepbrother, Daniel Coleman, was lazy and did not help with the household chores.  Accordingly, they left home shortly after their father's marriage and went to live with their sister, Mary (Sparks) Parker.  There they remained until they reached adulthood.

Dennis Sparks was fourteen years old when the Civil War broke out.  Two of his brothers, Citizen Napoleon Bonaparte Sparks and Joseph M. Sparks, aged about twenty and eighteen years, respectively, joined the 14th Regiment Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army, in July 1861 at Lineville, Alabama.  Another brother, Moses Andrew Jackson Sparks, also joined the 14th Regiment in February 1864.  Two brothers, Green B. Sparks and William H. Sparks, served the Confederacy in Georgia military units.

Dennis was too young to join the Confederate States Army until about a month before he reached his seventeenth birthday.  On October 1, 1864, he was mustered into Company A, commanded by Capt. George Bonner, of Col. Joseph Hardie's Battalion of Confederate Cavalry, as a private.  Sometime during the following winter, he was transferred to Company K in the same battalion.

Hardie's Battalion of Confederate Cavalry participated in the defense of Selma, Alabama, a city that was a major source of military guns and supplies for the Confederate Army.  The city was defended by a strong line of works about five miles long and anchored at one end by the Alabama River.  General James H. Wilson, Union leader, began his raid on the city on March 22, 1865, and was able to attack the city quickly.  The city was taken on the afternoon of April 2, 1865.

Dennis M. Sparks was among those who were taken prisoner that afternoon.  He was imprisoned at Selma for several days, but was paroled at Talladega, Alabama, on May 24, 1865.  According to the official prisoner of war roster of the United States Adjutant General's Office, he was listed as Pvt. D. M. Sparks, Co. F 51st Regiment Alabama Partisan Rangers.  His name was also borne on a prisoner of war roster as Pvt. E. M. Sparks, Co. K, Hardie's Alabama Confederate Battalion.

The date and place given on the Adjutant General's Office record of Dennis M. Sparks's parole is at variance with his memory.  Many years later, when he applied for an Alabama Confederate pension, he stated that he had been paroled on April 11, 1865, at Selma, Alabama.  His request for a pension was denied, apparently because he owned too much property.  He reapplied a few years later; on June 8, 1921, his new application was accepted, and he was placed upon the pension roll.  At that time, he was a member of Camp Pettus, a camp for Confederate veterans

After he was paroled, Sparks returned to his sister's home near Lineville, Alabama.  His only possessions were a pocket knife and seventy cents in coins.  Throughout the rest of his life, he believed in the value of metal money.  When he arrived home, he found the other members of his family working in the fields.

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DENNIS McFRANKLIN & JULIA ANN (McCOY) SPARKS, continued:

Years later, Dennis Sparks told his grandchildren of some of the incidents that happened during his military service.  He recalled that his sweetheart, Julia Ann McCoy, knitted him a pair of mittens.  He also remembered the thirst he had during the Battle of Selma - - a thirst that was so intense that he drank water which had collected in the hoof prints of the horses.  After his parole, his captors threw his cap in the air and shot it full of holes. They also took his horse, but he was able to get it back.

Another tale centered around a raid his outfit made against a Union Army camp in which a Yankee payroll, consisting of bundles of United States paper money, was scattered around the countryside. No one bothered to try to collect this loose currency because it was believed that paper money had no value - - only gold or silver coins were acceptable tender.  It was not until the war ended that the people regretted that they had treated the paper money so indifferently!

The portion of Talladega County in which the family of Dennis Sparks lived be came a part of Clay County when that county was formed in 1866, and thereafter most of his legal records can be found in Clay County.  It was to Clay County that he returned after he was paroled, and it was there that he was married to Julia Ann McCoy on November 11, 1866, just one week before he reached his nineteenth birthday.

Julia Ann McCoy had been born on October 8, 1847, and was a daughter of John and Mary (Chappell) McCoy.  For a wedding present, the McCoys gave the young couple eighty acres of land.  It is said that John McCoy had a high regard for his son-in-law and that they remained close friends until McCoy's death in 1877.

Sparks was basically a cotton and corn farmer, and at one time he worked seventeen mules in his cotton.  This was considered to be a fairly large cotton operation.  As his family grew, however, he began to involve his children in other business activities.  He owned and operated a general merchandise store for a number of years.  He also engaged in "huckstering" with one or more of his sons.  They would travel in a two-mule wagon full of store-bought goods which they traded to the people for eggs, chickens, fruit, etc. They would then dispose of the products to a wholesaler for additional merchandise to sell.

[Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

The Providence Primitive Baptist Church

(View photograph)

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[Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

FAMILY REUNION -- Children and Grandchildren of

Dennis and Julia Ann (McCoy) Sparks - 1908

(Identification of those in picture is given on page 4250)

(View photograph)

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DENNIS McFRANKLIN & JULIA ANN (McCOY) SPARKS, continued:

A family reunion of the children and grandchildren of Dennis and Julia Ann (McCoy) Sparks was held about 1908 at which a photograph was taken.  This has been reproduced on page 4249.  Identification of the twelve living children who attended (with their children) has been provided by descendants as follows:

Front Row, left to right: Coreene Joiner; Vernie Carwile; Johnie Carwile, unidentified boy; Mack Sparks; Bill Sparks holding unidentified boy; Velpo Sparks; Molly (Burks) Sparks holding unidentified child; unidentified child leaning on right leg of Dennis McFranklin Sparks; unidentified boy leaning against Julia Ann (McCoy) Sparks; Hubert Wallace; Bob Wallace; Gwin Wallace; Almedia (Sparks) Wallace holding Braxton Wallace.

Middle Row, left to right: Eugene Sparks; Alexander Joiner; Orla Lee Sparks; Mary Etta (Sparks) Joiner; Lula (Sparks) Boyd; Olie Sparks; Minnie (Sparks) Jones; Bob Sparks; Lee Ella Wallace; unidentified boy; Bertha
Carwile, unidentified girl; unidentified boy; Woody Sparks; Monroe Sparks; Mattie (Joiner) Sparks; Melford Wallace; Ellis Sparks; Dewey Wallace; Norman Carwile; unidentified boy; Cordia Sparks; unidentified boy; Sally (Nichols) Sparks; Tom Sparks holding Ralph Sparks.

Back Row, left to right: John Wesley Sparks; Beulah (Carpenter) Sparks; Dennis Walden Sparks holding Q. P. Sparks; Lee Emma (Hassell) Sparks holding Leon Sparks; Barto Sparks; Norma (Moon) Sparks holding Wilma Sparks; Eula (Sparks) Powell holding unidentified baby; Monroe Carwile; and Dora (Sparks) Carwile.

Julia Ann and Dennis Sparks were lifelong members of the Providence Primitive Baptist Church, located about two miles from their home. (A photograph of this church appears on page 4248.) The church was quite strict and did not believe its members should belong to organizations such as the Masons, Odd Fellows, etc.  The Sparkses were also strong believers in getting an education, and on one occasion, they hired a teacher to teach penmanship to their children.

Dennis and Julia also had a rather unusual custom which they followed at the weddings of their children.  They would give the child to be married a wedding present of $165.00 in gold coins.  The child was always admonished never to let all of the money get away, but always to save something back.  Some of these coins have been passed down and are now in the hands of great-grandchildren.

Of all of the fine qualities of Dennis and Julia Ann, their close relationship with their children and grandchildren appears to be one of their strongest.  The family reunion held about 1908 is pictorial proof of this quality.  (See page 4249, with the identification of individuals provided above.)

Some of the grandchildren remembered a special relationship with their grand parents.  They would take turns in making weekly visits to their grandparents, helping with the household chores.  One child had the privilege of helping her grandfather open his big iron safe, because he could no longer see the numbers.  Another told of helping his grandfather walk safely along a road which was traveled by automobiles.  Some of the grandchildren stayed with their grandparents for extended periods of time.  All of them appear to have been welcomed with open arms at all times.  Their children were:

A.  William E. ["Bill"] Sparks was born on February 2, 1868, in Clay County, and it was there that he was married to Mary ["Molly"] E. Burks on May 13, 1888.  Bill died on January 25, 1934, and Molly died on February 29, 1936.  They were buried in the Shiloh Cemetery. They had eight children:  Monroe, Olie, Ellis, Grover, Lula, Clarence, Thessel, and Grady.

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DENNIS MeFRANKLIN & JULIA ANN (McCOY) SPARKS, continued:

Children, continued:

B.  Joseph Henry Sparks was born on July 13, 1869.  He died on January 24, 1886, at the age of sixteen years.  He was buried in the Shiloh Cemetery.  He was never married.

C.  Robert ["Bob"] F. Sparks was born on August 5, 1870.  He was married to Delia E. H. Cook on August 28, 1891, in Clay County, Alabama.  She had been born on August 5, 1872.  Bob died on October 22, 1929, and Delia died on August 1, 1954.  They were buried in the Shiloh Cemetery.  They had seven children: Marvin, Cordia, Minnie, Bertie Lee, L. D., Velpo, and J. Q.

D. James Woodrow ["Woody"] Sparks was born on November 7, 1871.  He was married to Mattie A. Joiner on December 23, 1890, in Clay County.  She had been born in September 1871.  We have not learned the dates of their deaths; however, they were buried in Memory Hill Cemetery at Albertville, Alabama.  They had four children: Walter, Eula, James, and Woodrow.

E.  Nancy Almedia ["Media"] A. Sparks was born on July 15, 1873.  She was married to W. Robert ["Bob"] Wallace.  She died on March 30, 1941.  She and Bob had seven children: Melford, Braxton, Lee Ella, Hubert, Homer, Gwin, and Dewey.

F.  John Wesley Sparks was born on December 23, 1874.  He was married to Mary Beulah Carpenter on December 25, 1895, in Clay County.  She had been born on June 16, 1875. Wesley died on December 15, 1949, and Beulah died on May 6, 1959.  They were buried in the Shiloh Cemetery.  They had four children: Owen D., Mack F., Himan B., and Exor.

G.  An unnamed infant daughter was born to Dennis and Julia Ann Sparks on July 9, 1876.  She died on July 10, 1876, and was buried in the Shiloh Cemetery.

H.  Rose Eldora [" Dora"] Sparks was born on June 28, 1877.  She was married to Edward Monroe Carwile.  He had been born on March 6, 1872.  He died on December 19, 1933.  Dora died on September 21, 1947.  They were buried in the Shiloh Cemetery.  They had six children: Norman, Johnie Mae, Bertha, Vernie, Trudie, and Truit.

l.  Mary Etta Sparks was born on September 28, 1878.  She was married to Alexander ["Elic"] L. Joiner on December 25, 1898, in Clay County.  Elic was born on August 7, 1877.  Mary Etta died on December 27, 1942, in Autauga County, Alabama.  Elic died there on July 27, 1951.  They were buried in the White City Cemetery in Autauga County.  They had three children: Leslie, Durral, and Corrine.

J.  An unnamed infant was born to Dennis and Julia Ann Sparks on March 13, 1880, and died at birth.

K.  Orla Lee Sparks was born on June 23, 1881.  She died on July 12, 1918, and was buried in the Shiloh Cemetery.  She was never married.

L.  Cora Bell Sparks was born on June 23, 1881, and was a twin sister of Orla Lee Sparks, next above. She died in November 1881.

M.  Dennis Walden Sparks was born on June 5, 1883.  He was married to Lee Emma Hassell on January 7, 1906, in Clay County.  She had been born on July 28, 1881.  She died on December 2, 1979.  Dennis died on May 31, 1968. They were buried in the Shiloh Cemetery.  They had six children:  Q. P., Leon, Lorene, Mary Ethel, Nora Lee, and Charles Edward.

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DENNIS McFRANKLIN & JULIA ANN (McCOY) SPARKS, continued:

Children, continued:

N.  Thomas ["Tom"] Grover Sparks was born on November 15, 1884.  He was married to Sally Mae Nichols on January 8, 1905, in Clay County.  She had been born on May 3, 1886.  Tom died on May 3, 1966, in Coffee County, Alabama.  Sally died on December 8, 1967.  They were buried in Coffee County.  They had four children: Ralph M., Annie P., Clifford C., and Elsie Mae.

O. Eugene U. Sparks was born on April 21, 1887.  He was married to Effle Hassell on May 29, 1910, in Clay County.  She had been born on July 31, 1890, and was a daughter of Winfield Scott and H. M. ( ) Hassell.  She died on January 2, 1980.  Eugene died on March 19, 1981.  They were buried in Memory Gardens in Clay County.  They had five children: Henry B., James C., Mabel M., Russell F., and John D.

P.  W. Barto Sparks was born on April 12, 1889.  He was married to Norma Moon on July 21, 1907, in Clay County.  She had been born on July 6, 1889.  Barto died on January 20, 1960.  Norma died on December 2, 1977.  They were buried in the Shiloh Cemetry.  They had one child, Wilma.

[Editor's Note: The story about Dennis and Julia Ann Sparks has been compiled almost entirely by three of their descendants.  They are George C. Burdette, 5243 Rockborough Trail, Stone Mountain, Georgia (30083);  James C. Sparks, 805 Mt. Zion Avenue, Gadsden, Alabama (35901);  and Robert E. ["Bobby"] Sparks,
392 Williams Avenue, Rainbow City, Alabama (35906).

[For further information about this branch of the SPARKS family, see the following issues of the QUARTERLY:  In the issue for September 1960, Whole No. 31, p. 501, appears an abstract of the application of David Sparks (1794-1862), bro ther of Uriah Sparks, for bounty land based on his service in the War of 1812.  In the September 1964 issue, Whole No. 47, pp. 842-43, appears an abstract of the application of Uriah Sparks, father of Dennis McFranklin Sparks, for bounty land for his service in the War of 1812, in the same unit as his brother, David.  In the issue of September 1969, Whole No. 67, pp. 1257-65, appears an article on David Sparks (1794-1862) and his descendants.  In the issue of December 1980, Whole No. 112, on page 2258, appears a query of George C. Burdette regarding the family of Uriah Sparks (ca.1797-1863) with a list of his children, including Dennis McFranklin Sparks. In the QUARTERLY of June 1987, Whole No. 138, pp. 3061-84, appears an article entitled "Two Men Named Abel Sparks, Originally from Surry and Wilkes Counties, North Carolina";  on page 3067 of that article, we noted the evidence supporting our conclusion that Uriah and David Sparks were sons of Abel Sparks, born ca.1767, whose wife was Elizabeth Benge.]

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

SOME MARRIAGE RECORDS OF BUCHANAN COUNTY, MISSOURI

Mary Sparks to Richard Moss, April 4, 1844
William Sparkes to Sary Rector, December 15, 1845
Abigail Sparks to George W. Howard, December 19, 1845
James L. Sparks to Malinda Jane Sullivan, February 14, 1850
Charleton Sparks to Frances Jane Hurt, October 7, 1852
Sabrina A. Sparks to John N. Bradshaw, June 9, 1853

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HAVE WE FOUND THE PARENTS OF JOHN SPARKS (ca.1772-1858)

OF GREENUP COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AND BUCHANAN COUNTY, MISSOURI?

By Paul E. Sparks

The Sparks Family Association was in its infancy when an article about the naming of Sparks, Kansas, was published on pages 75-76 of the June 1955 issue of THE SPARKS QUARTERLY, No. 10.  According to that article, the village was originally called Highland Station, but it was renamed in 1908 for its oldest citizen, John Green Sparks, who had been born in 1825.  The writer of the article was Derril C. Sparks, a descendant of John Green Sparks.

As related in the article, John Green Sparks was born on March 11, 1825, in Greenup County, Kentucky, and was a son of "William John Sparks?? who had born about 1772 in Virginia and whose wife had been "Mary Jane Green."  They had been married about 1815, probably in Kentucky, according to this account.  She had been born about 1783 in Kentucky.  In 1825, the couple was in Greenup County, Kentucky.

Subsequent to the publication of this article, several descendants of "William John and Mary Jane (Green) Sparks" began exchanging information about them in an effort to identify their parents.  It soon became apparent that no record could be found that bore the given names of "William John" Sparks--he was always referred to as John Sparks. A second difference between the article and the records that were found was the name of "Mary Jane Green." No record has been found that gives Green as the maiden name of the wife of John Sparks, or Jane as her middle name.

The 1820 census listed John Sparks as head of a family in Greenup County, Kentucky.  He and his wife were both enumerated there as in the age category of 26 to 45.  Living in the household (quite likely their children) were a male and a female in the age category of 10 to 16, and one male and four females under 10 years of age.  (Readers are reminded that it was not until the 1850 census was taken that names, other than the head of each household, were recorded; all members of each household, including the head, were simply enumerated on federal censuses from 1790 through 1840.)

Living near John Sparks in Greenup County in 1820 was the family of Isaac Sparks.  In fact, Isaac's name was recorded on the census immediately following that of John Sparks.  Isaac and his wife were enumerated in the age category 26 to 45;  living in their household (quite likely their children) were one male between 10 and 16 years of age, as well as two males and two females under 10 years of age.

It seems quite probable that John Sparks and Isaac Sparks, who were listed on the 1820 census of Greenup County, Kentucky, were brothers;  however, a search there for their parents has not been successful.

Recently, another member of the Sparks Family Association, Michael L. Cox of 1358 Rice Road, Centerville, Indiana, 47330, has advanced the theory that John Sparks and Isaac Sparks were sons of Isaac Sparks, Sr., a pioneer settler of Estill County, Kentucky.  Isaac Sparks, Senior, whom we shall designate here after as "Old" Isaac, has been the subject of an article that was published in three issues of the QUARTERLY.  Those issues were: September 1973, Whole No. 83; March 1974, Whole No. 85; and June 1974, Whole No. 86.

We are inclined to agree with Mr. Cox's theory and believe our readers will find it to be quite convincing.  Both John Sparks and Isaac Sparks, Jr. seem to fit into the family of Isaac and Catherine (---------- ) Sparks of early Estill County, Kentucky.

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JOHN SPARKS (ca.1772-1858), Greenup Co., KY, & Buchanan Co., MO, continued:

As shown in the information published on pages 1634-1635 of the March 1974 issue of the QUARTERLY, John Sparks, son of "Old" Isaac, was born about 1772.  He was married to Mary ["Polly"] Bradshaw in May 1804, in Clark County, Kentucky, which borders Estill County on the latter's northern end.  The marriage bond for John Sparks and Mary Bradshaw, with Edward Kendred as bondsman, dated May 4, 1804, was recorded in Book 1, page 55 in Clark County.  She was a daughter of James Bradshaw.  When the 1810 census was taken of Estill County, John and Mary were enumerated along with three children, two sons and one daughter under ten years of age.  John paid taxes in Estill County from 1808 to 1819, but he was not listed on either the tax roll or on the census of that county in 1820.  We believe that he had moved to Greenup County in time to be listed, with his household enumerated, on the 1820 census there, as we noted on the previous page.

As shown in the information published on pages 1640-41 of the June 1974 issue of the QUARTERLY, Isaac Sparks, son of "0ld" Isaac, was born about 1783.  He was married to Annis McGuire in March 1809 (marriage bond dated March 8, 1809) in Estill County.  When the 1810 census was taken of Estill County, Isaac and Annis had one child, a son.  Isaac paid taxes in Estill County from 1812 to 1819; however, he paid no taxes there from 1819 to 1823.  He again paid taxes in Estill County from 1823 to 1829, but he paid no taxes there between 1829 and 1833.

(On the tax rolls of Estill County, Isaac Sparks, son of "Old" Isaac, was sometimes designated as "Isaac Sparks, Senior" in order to distinguish him from his nephew, Isaac Sparks, born about 1799, a son of Elijah Sparks.  "Old" Isaac Sparks, patriarch of the Estill County Sparkses, had died about 1815.)

As stated above, we believe that John Sparks and Isaac Sparks, sons of "Old" Isaac, left Estill County about 1819 and went to Greenup County where their names appeared, and their households were enumerated, on the 1820 census.  John remained in Greenup County, but Isaac returned to Estill County, probably because of the death of his wife, Annis.  It was there that he was married (2nd) to Frances Crawford on August 30, 1824.  Then, about 1829, Isaac went to Madison County, Kentucky, in time to appear, and his household to be enumerated, on the 1830 census.  By 1833, however, he had returned again to Estill County where he continued to live until his death about 1846.  Isaac and his descendants are described on pages 1640-1666 of' the June 1974 issue of the QUARTERLY.

(John Sparks and Isaac Sparks may have moved from Estill County to Greenup County in order to work in the iron industry.  Both counties produced iron in the early 1800s.  Both had natural iron ore and limestone, and both had forests to supply charcoal.  Today, historical markers commemorate the sites of these early furnaces in both Estill and Greenup Counties.  Greenup County, alone, has over a dozen such markers, while Estill County has about half that number.)

An analysis of the census records pertaining to John Sparks and Isaac Sparks show a remarkable similarity to the actual families of these men.  In the case of John Sparks, the 1810 census of Estill County provides a foundation for the 1820 and 1830 censuses of Greenup County, based on the enumeration of members of his household in age groups.  Similarly, in the case of Isaac Sparks, the 1810 census of Estill County provides a foundation for interpreting his entry on the 1820 census of Greenup County.

The largest obstacle to the acceptance of Mr. Cox's theory, as discussed above, centers around the maiden name of the wife of John Sparks.  Was her name Mary Jane Green, or was it Mary ["Polly"] Bradshaw? After several months of correspondence, we have now arrived at the conclusion that there is little, if any, evidence that her name was "Mary Jane Green."  Apparently, her maiden name was assumed to be Green because a son was given the name of John Green Sparks.

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JOHN SPARKS (ca.1772-1858), Greenup Co., KY, & Buchanan Co., MO, continued:

This assumption appears to have been handed down among several descendants until it became accepted as fact.  As noted above, however, we have the official record from Clark County, Kentucky, Book 1, page 55, of the marriage bond for John Sparks and Mary Bradshaw dated May 9, 1804, with Edward Kendred as bondsman.  (See the QUARTERLY of March 1963, Whole No. 41, p. 722, for this and other early Sparks marriage bonds in Clark County.)  It should be kept in mind that John Sparks was married in his "home" county of Clark; Estill County was not formed until 1808 from Clark and Madison Counties.

Likewise, there appears to be no foundation for the statement that the full name of John Sparks was "William John Sparks."  This assumption probably developed from the fact that the first son of John Sparks was named William.  No one seems to know how else the given name of William came to be assigned as a forename for John Sparks.

For the reasons set forth above, we are now inclined to believe that the John Sparks in early Greenup County, Kentucky, was the son of Isaac and Catherine Sparks of early Estill County, Kentucky.  As stated above, he was born about 1772, probably in that area of present-day western Pennsylvania which was claimed by both Pennsylvania and Virginia.  He and his spouse, Mary ["Polly"] (Bradshaw) Sparks, had two sons and five daughters when the 1820 census was taken of Greenup County.

On March 29, 1827, John Sparks bought 55 acres of land on Tygarts Creek in Greenup County from David White.  White was a resident of Scioto County, Ohio, just across the Ohio River from Greenup County.  In the following November, Sparks served on a jury which was concerned with the construction of a waterrun grist mill on Tygarts Creek near William Fuqua's old mill site.  When his family was enumerated on the 1830 census of Greenup County, another son had been added to the family.

When Carter County was formed in 1838 from the Kentucky counties of Greenup and Lawrence, John Sparks lived in that portion of Greenup County that became a part of the new county.  He was enumerated on the 1840 census of Carter County.  Four of his children were still at home in 1840, and he now owned 145 acres of land on Tygarts Creek, on which he paid taxes.

About 1845, John Sparks paid his last taxes in Carter County and moved to Missouri where he settled in Centre Township in Buchanan County.  When the 1850 census was taken of Buchanan County, he was listed as 77 years of age and a native of Kentucky.  His wife, Mary, was listed as 67 years of age and a native of Kentucky.

John Sparks died in Buchanan County, probably in the late summer of 1858.  His son, John G. Sparks, was appointed to administer his estate.  Mary Sparks, widow of John, was living in the home of her son, John G. Sparks, in Buchanan County, Missouri, when the 1860 census was taken.  She is believed to have died in 1863.

According to census records and information provided by descendants, John and Mary Sparks were the parents of at least eight children, all of whom reached maturity, and there is a possibility that they had two more daughters, born between 1815 and 1820, whom we have been unable to find.  All of their children were born in Kentucky.

A. William Sparks, b. ca.1806
B. Frances Sparks, b. June 1808
C. Isaac Sparks, b. ca.1810
D. Dulcena Sparks, b. ca.1812
E. Catherine Sparks, b. ca.1818
F. Abigail Sparks, b. November 9, 1820
G. Martha Sparks, b. ca.1820
H. John Green Sparks, b. March 11, 1825
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JOHN SPARKS (ca.1772-1858), Greenup Co., KY, a Buchanan Co., MO, continued:

 A. William ["Will"] Sparks, son of John and Mary (Bradshaw) Sparks, was born about 1806.  He was married twice.  His first marriage was to Emmaline Hyde on January 1, 1828, in Greenup County, Kentucky.  She had been born about 1807 and was a daughter of James Lewis Hyde.  She and Will sold land on Beech Fork in Greenup County to Benjamin Howland on August 4, 1840, and moved to Missouri where they rented land in Buchanan County.  It was there that Emmailne died about 1842, probably when her sixth child was born.

Will's second marriage was to Sarah A. (Emmerick) Rector on December 15, 1845, in Buchanan County.  She had been born about 1822 in Illinois and was a widow with two, possibly three, children by her former marriage.  In 1854, Will and Sarah moved their family to Texas where they were in Bosque County when the 1860 census was taken.  Will was described on that census as a tavern keeper.  In 1862, he and Sarah sold land in Denton County, Texas, and moved to Sebastian County, Arkansas.  It was there that they were listed on the 1870 census, and it was probably there that Will died sometime between 1870 and 1880.  When the 1880 census was taken, Sarah was shown as married to J. E. Stonestreet and was living in Washington County, Arkansas.

Will Sparks had twelve children, six by each of his marriages.

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JOHN SPARKS (ca.1772-1858), Greenup Co., KY, & Buchanan Co., MO, continued:

As was stated above, after the death of his first wife, Emmaline (Hyde) Sparks, William ["Will"] Sparks was married (2nd) to Sarah (Emmerick) Rector In 1845, and they had six children.


B. Frances Sparks, daughter of John and Mary (Bradshaw) Sparks, was born in June 1808.  She was married to Henry Culp in April 1825 in Greenup County, Kentucky.  The marriage bond was dated April 12, 1825, with her father acting as bondsman.  (The marriage was doubtless performed within a few days following the date of the bond.)  Henry had been born about 1805 in Kentucky and was a son of Tillman and Hannah D. Culp, natives of Pennsyl vania.  According to a descendant, Henry and Frances moved across the Ohio River to Scioto County, Ohio, about 1831, and then to Buchanan County, Missouri, about 1845.  They were the parents of nine children.

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JOHN SPARKS (ca.1772-1858), Greenup Co., KY, a Buchanan Co., MO, continued:

Family of Henry and Frances (Sparks) Culp, continued:

2.  Henry John Culp may have been born about 1829.  Apparently he was married twice.  His first marriage was to Dulcina --------  about 1850.  She died in October 1865 in Holt County, Missouri.  Henry's second marriage Was to Sabrina Abigail (Sparks) Bradshaw on May 8, 1866.  She had been born about 1834 and was a daughter of Isaac and Lucinda (Thomas) Sparks.  (See Item C, 1, below)  Henry died on December 4, 1894, at Nevada, Missouri. Sabrina died on May 10, 1916.
C.  Isaac Sparks, son of John and Mary (Bradshaw) Sparks, was born about 1810, according to information given on the 1850, 1860, and 1880 censuses.  On his tombstone in the Silent Cemetery at DeSoto, Kansas, his birth was inscribed as November 22, 1797.  He was married to Lucinda Thomas in March 1833, in Greenup County, Kentucky.  She had been born on July 15, 1812, in Kentucky and was a daughter of James Thomas, who acted as bondsman;  the marriage bond was dated March 15, 1833.  Isaac and Lucinda lived in that portion of Greenup County which became a part of Carter County in 1838, and when the 1840 census was taken, they were enumerated in Carter County.  About 1845, they moved to Buchanan County, Missouri, where they were listed on the 1850 and 1860 censuses.  They lived near the town of St. Joseph.

Sometime prior to 1880, Isaac and Lucinda moved across the Missouri River to Doniphan County, Kansas.  Isaac died on September 10, 1885, probably at the home of his sister, Abigail, in Jefferson County, Kansas.  Lucinda died on February 3, 1899.  They were buried in the Silent Cemetery at DeSoto, Kansas. They had five children.

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JOHN SPARKS (ca.1772-1858), Greenup Co., KY, a Buchanan Co., MO, continued:
 

D.  Dulcena Sparks, daughter of John and Mary (Bradshaw) Sparks, was born about 1812.  She was married twice.  Her first marriage was to Thomas Walker on November 19, 1828, in Greenup County, Kentucky.  Her second marriage was to Stephen Litteral on October 12, 1833, also in Greenup County.  We have not further information about her.

E.  Catherine Sparks, daughter of John and Mary (Bradshaw) Sparks, was born about 1818.  She was probably named for her paternal grandmother.  She was married to James W. Howard on December 12, 1836, in Greenup County, Kentucky.  He had been born about 1814 and was a son of Thomas and Nancy (Gardner) Howard.  He and Catherine moved to Buchanan County, Missouri, where James died in 1872.  Catherine died sometime after 1872.  They are said to have had twelve children.

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JOHN SPARKS (ca.1772 -1858), Greenup Co., KY, a Buchanan Co., MO, continued:

F.  Abigail Sparks, daughter of John and Mary (Bradshaw) Sparks, was born on November 19, 1820, in Greenup County, Kentucky.  She accompanied her parents to Buchanan County, Missouri, and it was there that she was married  to George Washington Howard on December 19, 1845.  He had been born on April 9, 1824, in Kentucky, and was a son of Thomas and Nancy (Gardner) Howard;  thus he was a brother of James W. Howard who was married to Abigail's sister, Catherine, in 1836. (See Item E, above)

According to Mary C. Bowen, a great-great-granddaughter, the Howards were in Buchanan County when the 1850 and 1860 censuses were taken.  By 1880, however, Abigail was in Jefferson County, Kansas.  She was listed on a special census of that county in 1885.  Her brother, Isaac Sparks, was also living in her household and was 76 years old.

Two of Abigail's sons, James Howard and David Howard, participated in the 1889 Oklahoma land run.  Abigail and her youngest son, Thomas, followed them soon afterward and filed an application for land in 1893.  By 1900, Abigail was living on her homestead, which was located on the boundary line between Kingfisher and Garfield Counties.  She died there on June 7, 1901, at the age of 81 years.  George W. Howard died on November 13, 1895, in Leavenworth County, Kansas.  He and Abigail were the parents of nine children.

G.  Martha ["Patsey") Sparks, daughter of John and Mary (Bradshaw) Sparks, was born about 1820.  She was married to James Litteral on October 29, 1841, in Carter County, Kentucky.  When the 1850 census was taken of Buchanan County, Missouri, she was listed in the household of her parents.  With her was a daughter, Abigail Litteral, aged 7, born in Kentucky.  James Litteral apparently had died prior to 1850.  Patsey (Sparks) Litteral probably died about 1857-58 since she was not named as an heir in the settlement of her father's estate in 1858.

H.  John Green Sparks, son of John and Mary (Bradshaw) Sparks, was born on March 11, 1825.  On February 12, 1844, he was married to Emily Henderson in Carter County, Kentucky.  She had been born on March 10, 1826, in Kentucky and was a daughter of Robert William and Eliza (Klink) Henderson.  (A History of Carter County, Kentucky, states that Robert William Henderson was married to Sarah Swim.  Perhaps he was married twice.)

The first two children of John and Emily (Henderson) Sparks were born in Kentucky, but about 1847 John and Emily moved to Buchanan County, Missouri, probably with his parents.  It was there that their other twelve child ren were born.  When the 1850 census was taken, John was renting a farm in Centre Township, but when the 1860 census was taken, he was shown as owning land valued at $6,400.  By this time, his father had died, and his mother was living in his household.

At the close of the Civil War, John moved his family across the Missouri River to Doniphan County, Kansas.  It was there that the village of Highland Station was renamed "Sparks" in his honor.  The story of the renaming was told in the June 1955 issue of the QUARTERLY.

Emily (Henderson) Sparks died on November 30, 1900.  John died on April 3, 1911.  They were buried in the lola Cemetery at Sparks, Kansas.  As stated above, they were the parents of fourteen children.


[Here appears three photographs, beneath which are the following captions:]


ROBERT WILLIAM SPARKS GENERVA ZENOBIA THOMPSON
Photographs Taken on Their  Wedding Day - January 18, 1872
(View photograph)
(View photograph)
JOHN SPARKS (ca.1772-1858), Greenup Co., KY, & Buchanan Co., MO, continued: (Editor's Note: This lengthy query has been published with the hope that it may lead to conclusive evidence being found regarding the parents of John Sparks of Greenup County, Kentucky, and Buchanan County, Missouri. As indicated, we are quite convinced that he was a son of Isaac and Catherine (---------- ) Sparks of early Estill County, Kentucky, we shall welcome hearing from anyone with evidence either in support of this theory or to the contrary.)

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In the QUARTERLIES of March 1990 and September 1990, Whole Nos. 149 and 151, appeared a two-part article devoted to Jesse Sparks (1773-1858) of Hickman County, Tennessee.  Jesse Sparks and his second wife, Susan May, had a daughter named Susan Sparks who was born on February 24, 1826.  Susan Sparks was married to James Cotham about 1844;  he was a son of Stephen and Mary (Shipp) Cotham.  Pages 3644-47 of the September 1990 issue of the QUARTERLY are devoted to the children and grandchildren of James and Susan (Sparks) Cotham.

One of our members, Frank A. Anderson of 410 South 11th St., Oxford, MS 38655, has asked that a query be published regarding a Stephen Cotham who was born on June 1, 1809, in Tennessee, and died on June 15, 1869, in Mississippi.  Mr. Anderson's wife's great-grandmother, Neva [Lovenia] Cotham, was a daughter of this Stephen Cotham.  Mr. Anderson notes: "Stephen Cotham was a son of Richard Cotham who was born about 1780 in North Carolina and died on January 1, 1855, in Arkansas.  What I would like to know, is how Stephen Cotham is connected with the Sparkses and Cothams mentioned on page 3644 of the QUARTERLY (September 1990 issue).  Stephen Cotham is referred to as 'Captain.' Did he serve in the military, or was his title an honorary one?"

Carolyn W. Parkman, P.O. Box 666, New Smyrna Beach, FL 32170, would like to correspond with other descendants of Amelia Sparks, whose parents were Elijah and Judith (Humphries) Sparks of Franklin County, Georgia.  (See the QUARTERLIES of March 1967, Whole No. 57, page 1042, and September 1989, Whole No. 147, pages 3438-45.)  Amelia Sparks was born on June 15, 1803;  she was married to John Bryson Word (1796-1882).  They lived in Carroll County, Georgia, and were the parents of Harriet Perry Word;  James 0. R. Word;  Elijah Word;  Martha Humphries Word;  William Adams Word;  Benjamin C. Word;  Amelia Elizabeth Word,  John Humphries Word;  Thomas Anderson Word;  Sarah Ann Word,  and Mary Francis Word.