THE
SPARKS QUARTERLY

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION

"To forget one's ancestors is to be a brook without a source, a tree
without a root." -- An old Chinese proverb.


VOL. XXIX,  NO. 1
 MARCH,  1981
Whole No.  113a

 
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[Here appears a photograph, beneath which is the following caption:]

THE OLD KENTUCKY HOME OF MADISON SPARKS (1795-1873)

OF OWEN COUNTY, KENTUCKY

(photograph taken in 1908)

(View Photograph)

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THE SPARKS QUARTERLY, published by THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION   Paul B. Sparks, President, 155 North Hite Ave., Louisville, Kentucky (40206)
Russell B. Bidlack, Secrety-Treasurer  Editor, 1709 Cherokee Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan (48104)
The Sparks Family Association was founded in March 1953 as a non-profit organization devoted to the assembling and preserving of genealogical and historical materials pertaining to the Sparks Family in America. Membership in the Association is open to all persons connected with the Sparks Family, whether by blood, marriage, or adoption, and to persons interested in genealogical research. Membership falls into three classes: Active, Contributing, and Sustaining. Active Membership dues are $5.00 per year; Contributing Membership dues are $10.00 per year; and Sustaining Membership dues are any amount over $10.00 that the member wishes to contribute to the support of the Association.

All members of the Association receive THE SPARKS QUARTERLY as it is published in March, June, September, and December. Back issues are kept in print and are available for $4.00 per issue. The first issue of the QUARTERLY was published in March l953. Five indexes have been published for the years 1953-1957, 1958 -1962, l963 -1967, 1968 -1972, and 1973 -1977. Each is available for $4.00. A complete file of back issues of the QUARTERLY (1953 -1980) with the five indexes may be purchased for $110.00.(These twenty-eight years of the QUARTERLY comprise 2266 pages of Sparks Family history. The five indexes total an additional 360 pages.)

THE OLD KENTUCKY HOME OF MADISON SPARKS

On the cover of this issue of the QUARTERLY we have reproduced a photograph of the home of Madison Sparks located near the town of Monterey in Owen County, Kentucky, along the Kentucky River. The photograph was taken in 1908 and was sent to the editor some twenty years ago by the late Margaret R. Miller. Mrs. Miller was a granddaughter of Madison Sparks (1795-1873) who was a son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks (see the QUARTERLY of March 1962, Whole No. 37, for a record of this family.) Madison Sparks married as his first wife Fanny Sparks,daughter of  Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks (see page 2279 of the current issue of the QUARTERLY). Madison and Fanny were first cousins. Fanny died sometime after 1820 - - there were no children. Madison married, second, in 1827 Mrs.Winifred (Thomas) Stafford, by whom he had nine children.

1. Alvah Thomas Sparks, born January 8, 1828, died October 1888.

2. Joseph Spencer Sparks, born May 12, 1829, died January 27, 1892. He married Melissa C. Eachus.

3. George Washington Sparks, born June 4, 1831, died October 8, 1896. He married Clarissa (?) Weems.

4. Russell Hill Sparks, born May 5, 1833, died December 1912. He married Addie Yarbrough.

5. Reuben Moore Sparks, born January 8, 1835, died April 17, 1902. He married Elizabeth Bank.

6. Canfleld D. Sparks, born September 1836, died August 18, 1837.

7. Jordan Sparks, tarn January 8, 1839, died October 1, 1864. He married Sarah Thower (or Thrower).

8. Lucy Sparks, born May 17, l841, died February 20, 1922. She married (first) a Dr. Jones and (second) Thomas Smoot.

9. William Henry Sparks, born about 1844, died November 17, 1904. He married Englantine ArnoId.

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THE OLD KENTUCKY HOME OF MADISON SPARKS, continued:

Mrs. Miller wrote the following description of the Madison Sparks house in 1960:  “The old home of Madison Sparks & Winifred where their children were born was quite a mansion in its day. It had 12 rooms. The front faces the Kentucky River.The old portico with its large posts has been taken away, but the stone steps still remain. In the front was the entrance opening onto the parlor on one side and the large living room on the other. Each had a large fire place. The living room and parlor open into the hall where the stairs have fancy bannisters. From the hall the large dining room and then the kitchen. There was formerly a large cook room and on the side a large veranda, both upstairs and downstairs. The location commanded a beautiful view of the river. There were cabins for the Negroes and several barns. The produce from the farm was sent down the river.”

Descendants of Madison Sparks are urged to write to the editor. An article on this branch of the Sparks family is being planned for future publication.

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FURTHER THOUGHTS ABOUT THE FAMILY OF JOHN AND SARAH (SHORES) SPARKS

By Paul E. Sparks

(Editor's Note: This article deals with one of the most common and difficult genealogical problems, namely, that of making the correct identification of persons who have the same name and who were born at about the same time and near the same place. Our readers should refer to the following issues of THE SPARKS QUARTERLY regarding this family: December 1955, Whole No. 12; June 1959, Whole No. 26; December 1963,  Whole No. 44 and December 1970, Whole No. 72.)

For several years, the author of this article has struggled with the problem of  determining the number and names of the children of his 3rd-great-grandparents, John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks, of Wilkes County, North Carolina. At the time the first article about this family was published in the QUARTERLY, it was believed that John and Sarah had twelve children, ten sons and two daughters.(See page 100 of the December 1955 issue.) Since that time, however, census data have shown that they had only eleven children, eight sons and three daughters. (It should be remembered that the census records prior to 1880 did not show relationships among members of households, and prior to the census of 1850 only the head of each household was actually named, the other members being simply enumerated by age categories. It is assumed, however, in the following references to John Sparks appearance on census records that the children enumerated in his household were, indeed, his own children.)

John Sparks appeared on the North Carolina state census which was taken of Wilkes County, 1784 -1787, with his wife and their three sons and one daughter. On the federal census of 1790 of Wilkes County, another son and another daughter had been added, making a total of four sons and two daughters, all born between 1774 and 1790. When the 1800 census was taken, three additional sons and one additional daughter were enumerated, all born between 1790 and 1800. Another son
was born between 1800 and 1810 and was listed on the 1810 census. From these data, it seems quite apparent that John and Sarah had eleven children.

The twelve children of John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks, as listed on page 100 of the December 1955 issue of the QUARTERLY, were: Levi, Mary, William, Joel, Robert, Jonathan, Solomon, Sarah, John Jr., George, Reuben, and Colby. Four of these were questionable: William, Robert, Jonathan, and Solomon. Since that time, however, it has been determined that there was no son named William Sparks; that Jonathan Sparks was a nephew, not a son; that Solomon Sparks was a son, but was incorrectly identified; and that there was one unidentified daughter. The identification of the rest as shown on page 100 appears to be correct.

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FURTHER THOUGHTS ABOUT THE FAMILY OF JOHN AND SARAH (SHORES) SPARKS, continued:

Here is what we have found about the four children who were incorrectly listed:

1. William Sparks. According to a descendant, there was a tradition that John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks had a son by this name. We have found no supporting evidence.

2. Jonathan Sparks. About 1821, a fairly large group of families left the Surry-Wilkes Counties area of North Carolina and moved to Lawrence County, Kentucky. Among these were the families of George Sparks, Levi Sparks, Jesse Sparks, Jonathan Sparks, and Thomas Sparks. George Sparks and Levi Sparks were brothers, sons of John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks, and the other Sparkses were cousins of varying degrees of George and Levi.

On August 21, 1826, Jonathan Sparks appeared before the Lawrence County Clerk and gave a power-of-attorney to his brother, George Sparks, to act for him (Jonathan) in Surry County, North Carolina. For obvious reasons, I have assumed through the years that the George Sparks referred to in the Power-of-Attorney document was the George Sparks who was my 2nd-great-grandfather,and thus I have spent many hours fruitlessly attempting to reconcile my thinking with the census data which we had found for John and Sarah. I am now convinced that the George Sparks who was a brother of Jonathan Sparks was not my 2nd-great-grandfather. I am further convinced that the power-of-attorney given by Jonathan Sparks was carried to Surry County and was there given to his brother, George Sparks. George Sparks then used the document in settling the estate of his parents, Solomon and Charity Sparks.(Further details of the settlement of their estate can be found on page 385 of the June 1959 issue of the QUARTERLY.)

Jonathan Sparks, son of Solomon and Charity Sparks, was born about 1797 in Wilkes County. He married Elizabeth Chappel, probably about 1818. She had witnessed the will of Jonathan's father, Solomon Sparks, and had proved the will before the February 1818 term of the Wilkes County Court. When the1820 census was taken of Wilkes County, Jonathan and Elizabeth had one child, a son.

As stated above, about 1821 Jonathan moved to Lawrence County, Kentucky, where he bought land on Big Blaine Creek in August 1822 and again in 1826. He sold this land on August 15, 1828, and returned to Wilkes County. There, on May 6, 1829, he and his brother, Joseph, acted as security for their brother, Samuel Sparks, who was administering the estate of their parents.

Jonathan Sparks did not appear on the 1830 census of Wilkes County, nor have we found him on any other 1830 census record. By 1836, according to a descendant, he had moved to Tazewell County, Virginia, where he died in 1846. He left five children, three sons and two daughters.

(Jonathan Sparks, son of Solomon and Charity Sparks, should not be confused with his cousin, Jonathan Sparks, who was probably a son of Joseph Sparks. Joseph Sparks was a son of Solomon and Sarah Sparks who had moved from Frederick County, Maryland, about 1755-1760 and who had finally settled in Surry County, North Carolina. Jonathan Sparks, probable son of Joseph, was born about 1792 in Surry County and it was there that he married Rachel Swaim on November 26, 1817. When the 1820 census was taken of that county, they had three children, two sons and one daughter.

Jonathan Sparks, probable son of Joseph, paid taxes on 220 acres of land on Beaverdam Creek in Surry County from 1815 to 1822, but by 1830 he was in Jackson County, Alabama. Four more children had now been born to Jonathan and Rachel, two sons and two daughters. Sometime between 1830 and 1840,Jonathan moved to Franklin County, Tennessee, where he appeared on the 1840 and 1850 censuses. From census records, it appears that he and Rachel had

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FURTHER THOUGHTS ABOUT THE FAMILY OF JOHN AND SARAH (SHORES) SPARKS, continued:

twelve children, six sons and six daughters. For further details about this family, see pages 1355 -1360 of the December 1970 issue of the QUARTERLY.)

3. SOLOMON SPARKS. A brief account of the first Solomon Sparks who was in this area of North Carolina was given on pages 97-98 of the December 1955 issue of the QUARTERLY and will not be repeated here. Suffice it for me to state that Solomon Sparks (born about 1720 and died about 1790) had five sons as proven by a power-of-attorney in 1801, and there may have been others, including a son named James Sparks. Each of these sons named a son “Solomon,”and we have found records of five Solomon Sparkses who were born between 1788 and 1792 in this area of North Carolina.

The preceding paragraph was written to point up the problem which must be faced when we try to give the correct identification to one of these Solomon Sparkses. In spite of this difficulty, however, I am now convinced that the Solomon Sparks who was a son of John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks was the one who appeared on pages 780 -781 of the December 1963 issue of the QUARTERLY. He was probably born about 1790 (he was 60 years old on the 1850 census) and he was probably married about 1811. When the 1820 census was taken of Wilkes County, he was listed with his wife and five children, all born between 1810 and 1820. By 1850, he was in Cherokee County, North Carolina (age 60) with wife, Julia or Judah (age 44) and son, Joel (age 22). Living nearby was Samuel P. Sparks (age 29) and family.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860, Solomon Sparks moved to Carter County, Kentucky, probably to be near his numerous relatives in that area, including his brothers, George and Levi. He stayed there about three years, but returned to his former home near Warne, North Carolina. He apparently died sometime near 1860, and his widow, Judah, went to live with her son, Joel Sparks, who had married about 1853. Joel moved to Ohio about 1865 and when the 1870 census was taken, he and his family were living near Goshen in Clermont County. With him was his mother, Juda A. Sparks, now aged 66. By 1880, Joel was in Elliott County, Kentucky, and with him was his mother,now aged 76.

Joel and Mary Jane (Grow) Sparks did not remain long in Elliott County, and shortly after the 1880 census was taken they returned to Cherokee County, North Carolina. Perhaps the strongest reason for their leaving Elliot tCounty was the murder of their son, Solomon Sparks, in 1879. Solomon was a young man about 24 years old at the time. As described by a member of the Sparks Family Association, here is how the tragic incident occurred:

“The killing of Solomon Sparks took place about 1879. Joel Sparks, who married Mary Jane Grow, had a son, Solomon, born about 1855. He was stabbed and killed at a dance on the Little Fork of the Little Sandy River by one of the Porter boys. The two Porters had chosen their man to kill. One was to kill Sol Sparks; the other was to kill Elliott Sparks, son of William Sparks. All lights were suddenly extinguished; Sol Sparks was killed instantly, and Elliott Sparks was injured so badly that he lived only a short time after- wards. After the murder, Joel Sparks moved his family back to Cherokee County, North Carolina.”
Elliott Sparks, mentioned in this account, was James Milton Elliott Sparks, son of William and Mary “Polly” (Lyon) Sparks, and grandson of Robert and Margaret (Pigg) Sparks. He was born about 1851 in Lawrence County, Kentucky. He married twice. His first marriage was to Mary Margaret Johnson on April 29, 1871, in Elliott County, Kentucky. They had one child, a son,William Franklin Sparks. Elliott (as he was called) married (2nd) Nancy Ison, probably about 1879. She was born on August 14, 1850, and was a

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FURTHER THOUGHTS ABOUT THE FAMILY OF JOHN AND SARAH (SHORES) SPARKS,continued:

daughter of Martin and Nancy (Sparks) Ison, thus she and Elliott were first cousins.

After receiving the knife wound, Elliott Sparks lingered until the spring of 1881 before he died. When he died, his wife, Nancy, was pregnant with their first child. The child was born on September 25, 1881, and was named Doctor Martin Sparks. (See page 101 of the December 1955 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 12.)

4. An unidentified daughter of John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks was born between 1790 and 1794.
The late William Perry Johnson, who was the Historian-Genealogist for the Sparks Family Association for 27 years, and I exchanged several notes about the size of the family of John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks. We were in agreement that, according to census records, this couple had eleven children. We could identify all of these except the one daughter. Here are these children. Further details may be found regarding them in the December 1955 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 12.
1. Levi Sparks, born October 2, 1778, died October 12, 1851; married (1st) ----- Walsh; married (2nd) Sarah Lyon; appeared on the following censuses: 1810 and 1820 of Wilkes County, North Carolina; 1830, 1840, and 1850 of Lawrence County, Kentucky.

2. Robert Sparks, probably born about 1782, died probably about 1815; married Margaret Pigg about 1804.

3. Mary Sparks, probably born about 1782, probably died about 1855; married Robert Bauguess, probably about 1801.

4. Joel Sparks, probably born about 1784; died December 1849; married Nancy Blackburn on July 27, 1814; appeared on the 1820, 1830, 1840, and 1850 censuses of Wilkes County, North Carolina.

5. John Sparks, Jr., probably born about 1785, probably died about 1865; married Mary Fields, probably about 1815; appeared on the 1820,1830, 1840, and 1860 censuses of Wilkes County, North Carolina.

6. An unidentified daughter of John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks was born about 1787.

7. Solomon Sparks, born about 1790; probably died about 1860; married (1st)----- ----- probably about 1811; married (2nd) Judah or Julia A. ----- probably about 1824. Appeared on the 1820 census of Wilkes County, NorthCarolina, and the 1850 census of Cherokee County, North Carolina.

8. Sarah Sparks, born about 1792; died after 1860; married William Alexander on March 18, 1820; appeared on the 1850 and 1860 censuses of Wilkes County,North Carolina.

9. George Sparks, born November 9, 1796, died May 11, 1879; married (1st) a Miss Mainer or Maynard, probably about 1815; married (2nd) Nancy Short on August 6, 1822; appeared on the 1830 and 1850 censuses of Lawrence County, Kentucky, and on the 1860 census of Carter County, Kentucky.

10. Reuben Sparks, born September 26, 1799, died March 9, 1878; married Phoebe Blackburn on October 10, 1828; appeared on the 1830, 1840, 1850, 1860,and 1870 censuses of Wilkes County, North Carolina.

11. Colby Sparks, born about 1801, died 1869; married Sarah Pruitt on December 28, 1822; appeared on the 1830, 184o, 1850, and 1860 censuses of Wilkes County, North Carolina.

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HUMPREY SPARKS (ca.1749-ca.1827) OF CULPEPER. COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND SCOTT

AND OWEN COUNTY, KENTUCKY

By Paul E. Sparks

(Editor’s Note: On pages 136-137 of the June 1956 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole
No. 14, we presented the family of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks who lived in Culpeper County, Virginia, before moving to Scott County, Kentucky, in 1795. The information we had at that time of this family was taken from an article written by William B. Newman, entitled “Towles and. Clark Families,” which appeared in Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. XIII, No. 1, July 1931. Since that article was written, other data have been found about the family of Humphrey and Milly Sparks.  We are pleased to share these with our readers.)

Humphrey Sparks, son of Thomas and Mary (Towles) Sparks, was born about 1749 in Culpeper County, Virginia, and it was probably there that he married Milly Nalle about 1775. She was born about 1758 and. was a daughter of Martin (born ca.1702) and Isabelle Nalle of Culpeper County.  Her grandfather was also named Martin Nalle who came from England to Virginia in 1701-02. Humphrey and Milly Sparks moved to Kentucky in 1795 and settled on McConnell Run in Scott County near the Franklin County line. Humphrey paid taxes there in 1795 and continued to be the only person named SPARKS who paid taxes there until 1806 when he was joined by his son, James Sparks, as a taxpayer. Humphrey paid taxes in Scott County until 1812 when he apparently moved to Frankin County.

Humphrey Sparks paid taxes in Franklin County until 1818 and when Owen County was
formed in 1819, he went with the newly-formed county. He paid taxes in Owen County until 1823 when he apparently went to live with his son, Martin Sparks. Humphrey died about 1827.

Milly Sparks, wife of Humphrey Sparks, joined the Forks of Elkhorn (Baptist) Church in 1801. She was listed on the church minutes as Milly Sparks, Sr., probably to distinguish her from her daughter, Milly Sparks, Jr., who was also a member of the church. Both were dismissed from that church when the family moved to what is now Owen County in 1818.

Information about the children of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks has came from four sources.

1. The first source to consider will be the June 1956 issue of THE SPARKS QUARTERLY which is mentioned above. According to an article appearing in that issue, William Newman, an eminent genealogist, prepared an article about theTowles and Clark families of Culpeper County, Virginia, but extended his research to include the Sparkses who had intermarried with these families. He did not reveal the source of his information, but he stated that Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks had seven children: (1) Caty Sparks, (2) Mareba Sparks, (3) Fanny Sparks, 4) Martin Sparks, (5) Isabella Sparks, (6) Milly Sparks,and (7) Humphrey Sparks.
2. A second source of information about the family of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks is Forks of Elkhorn Church, a book published in 1946 by the StandardPrinting Co., Louisville, Kentucky. The author is Mrs. Ermina Jett Darnell who transcribed the old church minutes and then added several pages of genealogical notes about the members of the early church. Here is how the family of Humphrey and Milly Sparks appeared in that book, on page 269:
“Milly Sparks, Sr., 1801, dis 1818. Isabella Sparks, 1802. Milly Sparks,Jr.,dis 1818. The Sparks family came from Culpeper Co., Va. Humphrey Sparks m Milly Nall, and they were in Scott Co., Ky., 1795, removing later to Owen Co., Ky. Their children were: 1. Caty, born, before 1783; 2. Maria, who died in Henry Co., Ky., 1859; 3. Fanny m. Madison Sparks; 4. Martin m Caty Middleton in Woodford Co., Ky., 1801;  5. Isabella Ballard;
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HUMPHREY SPARKS (ca.1749-ca.1827), continued:
6. Milly Smither; 7. Humphrey Sparks m Eliza Ann Calvert in Franklin Co.,Ky., 1836. Sarah Palmer, niece of Martin Sparks, m. R. F. Oliver in Owen Co., Ky., 1847.”
There are two errors in notes by Mrs. Darnell. Both are easy to understand,for they involve the given names of Humphrey and Milly. Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks did have children named Humphrey Sparks and Milly Sparks, but from all that we can learn, neither of them ever married. The Humphrey Sparks who married Eliza Ann Calvert in Franklin Co., Ky., in 1836, was a son of Anthony and Mary (Sparks) Sparks and was a grandson of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, Mary (wife of Anthony) being their daughter. Likewise, the Milly Sparks who married Wesley Smither about 1830 was a daughter of Anthony and Mary (Sparks) Sparks, and also a granddaughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks.

3. A third source of information about the children of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle)Sparks is a deposition made by James Jones and Dennis Byrns in Owen County,Kentucky, on September 1, 1845. The deposition was made in a suit in chancery in Madison County, Virginia. The complainant was James Clark, administrator of the will of Mary Clark, deceased, and the defendants were Joseph Hume andNathaniel Tatum, executors of the will of Henry Towles, deceased. Here is Mr.Jones’s deposition in part:

“He knew Humphrey Sparks, deceased, who died sometime prior to the year 1830, deponent thinks about the year 1827. The decedent left as his heirs, James Sparks who lives in the state of Illinois; Martin Sparks; Isabella Ballard, widow of Johnson Ballard, deceased; Elleanor Sparks who lives in Owen Co., Ky.; Peachy Kilby, late Sparks, who intermarried with John Kilby who lives in Scott Co., Ky.; Thomas Sparks who lives in Henry Co., Ky.; also Mary Sparks who intermarried with Anthony Sparks who died in March1843 leaving her husband with several children; and Towles Palmer and Sally Palmer, children of Susan Palmer, deceased, late Sparks, who intermarried with Charles Palmer, deceased; and Nancy Cole, late Sparks, who intermarried with Jesse Cole, and who is dead leaving her husband and several children.”

Mr. Jones was joined in the deposition by Dennis Byrns who stated that he “adopted it as his own.

The list of children given by Mr. Jones and Mr. Byrns is most puzzling when compared with the other two lists, for they do not have five of the children which the other two lists have. In addition, they have six names which are not included in the other two sources. In spite of these great differences, however, since the deposition was made a relatively short time after the death of Humphrey Sparks, and since both Mr. Jones and Mr. Byrns knew him personally, we are inclined to accept this list as more accurate than the other two.There are a few discrepancies in this list, too, and here are our notes regarding them:

The deposition by Jones and Byrns made no mention of Caty Sparks who was identified as a child of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks when her grandfather’s(Martin Nalle’s) will was made in 1783. She may have died prior to 1845; she may have been the Elleanor Sparks named in the deposition; or her name may have been Catherine Eleanor.

No mention was made in the deposition of Fanny Sparks who married Madison Sparks in 1818 in Woodford County, Kentucky. Her father, Huphrey Sparks,was named on the marriage record. She died about 1825, apparently without issue, and had probably been forgotten by Jones and Byrns.

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HUMPHREY SPARKS (ca.1749-ca.1827), continued:

The deposition made no mention of Mariah Sparks. She died in Henry County, Kentucky, in 1855, and her father, Humphrey Sparks, was named on the death certificate. She married Thomas Jameson Sparks on October 17, 1831, in Owen County.  He was a son of Robert and Isabella (Ford) Sparks, thus he and Mariah were first cousins, once removed. (See the June 1967 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 58, for a further account of the family of Robert and Isabella (Ford) Sparks.)

Finally, the deposition made no mention of Humphrey Sparks, Jr., and of Milly Sparks, Jr., children of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks. Both had probably died prior to the taking of the deposition in 1845.

4. The fourth source concerning the children of Humphrey Sparks, and his wife, Milly (Nalle) Sparks, is the 1810 census of Scott County, Kentucky. According to that census, Humphrey Sparks was the head of a household which included (in addition to himself and his spouse, both born prior to 1765), two males and six females. Assuming that all were his children, and having knowledge that one son and three daughters were married prior to 1810, this would mean that Humphrey and Milly were the parents of twelve children.
A composite list of the children of Humphrey and Milly Sparks from all of our sources given above contains a total of fifteen. If we assume that they had only twelve children, then three of the fifteen names should be eliminated from further consideration. In our opinion, the following three should be eliminated:

Thomas Sparks. We have found no records of a Thomas Sparks who was a son of Humphrey and Milly. It is true, as we have indicated elsewhere in this article, that Thomas Jameson Sparks, son of Robert and Isabella (Ford) Sparks, married Mariah Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly, and they lived in Henry County, Kentucky. Perhaps Mr. Jones and Byrns were confused about Thomas Jameson Sparks’s relationship to Humphrey.

Eleanor Sparks. We have found no records of an Eleanor Sparks, nor any of a Nellie Sparks, nickname of Eleanor, in this section of early Kentucky.  As indicated else- where, Eleanor may have been part of a double given name, such as Catherine Eleanor.

Mareba Sparks. She may have been Mariah Sparks, and perhaps her name was mis- copied as “Mareba.” She may have been Mary B. Sparks, and her name was mis- spelled as Mareba. In either case, we have found no records of a Mareba Sparks.

With the elimination of these three names, we now have the names of the twelve children whom we believe to have been the children of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks. Assuming that Humphrey and Milly were married about 1775, we will now attempt to place these twelve children in a logical order of birth. We will also give a brief biography about each of them.

A. Nancy Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, may have been the oldest child. In the Forks of Elkhorn Church, Mrs. Darnell stated in a separate ancestral note that “Nancy Sparks, contemporary with Humphrey Sparks and Henry Sparks m Jesse Cole.” For this reason, we place her date of birth as about 1776. She was married to Jesse James Cole probably about 1792. He was born about 1769, and was a son of Richard James and Ann (Hubbard) Cole.
Nancy (Sparks) Cole apparently died about 1815 and after her death, Jesse Cole married Elizabeth Roberts and they moved to Ripley County, Indiana. Jesse died there in 1857. He and Nancy had eight children according to information received from a descendant, Mrs. Averil Larson.
1. Jeremiah Cole was probably born about 1793. He died in 1854 in Andrew County, Missouri. He married Rebecca Young on May 25, 1820, and they had nine children: Richard, Martha, Catherine, Mary, Eliza, Elizabeth, John, Margaret, and Abigail.
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HUMPHREY SPARKS (ca.1749-ca.1827), continued:

Children of Nancy (Sparks) Cole and Jesse James Cole, continued:

2. Charles C. Cole was born about 1795. He died in 1854 in Ripley County,  Indiana. He married Sarah Brown on Aug. 19, 1818, in Ripley County and they had eight children: William, Mary, Sally Ann, Jesse, Elizabeth, Sisley, Anthony, and one child whose name we have not learned.
3. Elizabeth Cole was probably born about 1798. She married Noah Ransdoll and they had six children: Jesse, Benjamin, William, Nancy, Julie,and Millie.
4. John Hubbard Cole was born on Nov. 15, 1801, in Kentucky. He died on Apr. 23, 1875. On Nov. 4, 1825, he married Sarah Henry Collier. She was born on Feb. 10, 1808, in Garrard County, Kentucky. She died in 1879. They had ten children: Nancy, Millie, Mary, Sarah, Jesse, John, Capt. Robert, William, Samuel, and Emily.
5. Jesse Cole was born about 1805 in Franklin County, Kentucky. He married Aljailina Wheeler in 1826 in Shelby County, Indiana, and they had eight child- ren: John, Sarah, Berilla, Aljailina, Jesse, Jr., Benjamin,Jane, and Henry.
6. Mary Cole was probably born about 1806. She married George Young on Jan. 15, 1821.
7. Milly Cole was probably born about 1807. On March 28, 1824, she married George Saylor in Ripley County, Indiana. They had at least one child, William B. Cole.
8. Nancy Cole was probably born about 1810. She married Hezekiah Evans on Oct. 25, 1824, and they had two children, Benjamin and Elijah.
B. Caty Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was born prior to 1783 for she was named that year in the will of her maternal grandfather, Martin Nalle dated March 7, 1783 (probated September 15, 1788). Conjecture would place her date of birth as about 1778. She may have been the Katherine Sparks, aged 65, who was living in the household of John Sparks, age 46, when the 1850 census was taken of Owen County, Kentucky. John Sparks was a bachelor. He was a son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks, Henry being a brother ofHumphrey.
C. James Sparks, son of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probably born about 1780. (He was listed as 69 years of age on the 1850 census of Schuyler County, Illinois.) He paid taxes first in Scott County, Kentucky, in 1804 and continued to pay taxes there until about 1830, when he apparently moved away. He is undoubtedly the James Sparks who appeared on the 1850 census of Schuyler County, Illinois. He was then 69 years of age and his birth was recorded as having taken place in Virginia. With him in 1850 was his wife, Elizabeth,aged 55, born in Kentucky. They had four children, all born in Kentucky.
1. Hamilton Sparks was born about 1819. In 1850 he was living in the house- hold of his parents, but when the 1880 census was taken of Schuyler County, he was the head of a household which included his sister, Jane Sparks, 57; his sister, Mildred Sparks, age 55; and a niece, Mary Sparks, age 20. A Melvina Sparks, born about 1855, may also have been a niece - - she was listed in the household of Hamilton Sparks in the city of Rushville in Schuyler County when the 1870 census was taken - - Melvina was then 15 years old.
2. Fountain Sparks was born about 1823. He was probably the father of the Mary Sparks who appeared in the household of her uncle, Hamilton Sparks, in 1880.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
-2277-
HUMPHREY SPARKS (ca.1749-ca.1827), continued:

   Children of James and Elizabeth Sparks, continued:

3. Jane L. Sparks was born about 1825. She apparently never married.
4. Mildred H. Sparks was born about 1829. She apparently never married.
D. Martin Sparks, son of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probably born about 1782. He married Caty Middleton on October 3, 1801, in Woodford County, Kentucky. In 1810, Martin and Caty were in Madison County, Ky.(See the September 1956 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 15.) By 1820, however, Martin Sparks had moved to the newly-formed Owen County where he joined his parents. He continued to live in Owen County until his death which occurred between January and April 1849. Martin Sparks made a willon January 18, 1849, by which he left two-tbirds of his estate to his son, Abram Gregory Sparks, and one-third to his daughter, Milly Sparks. The will was probated at the April term of the Owen County Court. Apparently, his wife, Caty (Middleton) Sparks had died and Abraham and Milly were the only children at home. According to census records, Martin and Caty had six children, five sons and one daughter.
1. Middleton Sparks was born about 1802, since he paid poll taxes in Owen County in 1823 as over age 21. On April 30, 1832, he married Nancy Williams in Owen County.
2., 3., 4. Three other sons of Martin and Caty were born between 1800 and 1810, but we have not succeeded in identifying them.
5. Mildred “Milly” Sparks was born about 1812. On November 10, 1856,she married Thomas Jameson Sparks in Owen County. He was born onOct. 10, 1804, in Virginia and was a son of Robert and Isabelle(Ford) Sparks. (See the June 1967 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No.58, fox further details of this family.) Milly and Thomas J. Sparkshad no children. (Thomas Jameson Sparks’s first wife had been Mariah Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly Sparks.)

6. Abraham Gregory Sparks was born about 1814. On July 13, 1858, he married Sarah Frances (Martin) Moore in Franklin County, Kentucky. She was born about 1828 in Scott County, Kentucky, and was a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Cole) Martin. She was a widow at the time of her marriage to Abraham Sparks. She died September 10,1875; Abraham died on July 18, 1886. He and Sarah had three children: Martin, born 1859, died 1860; Sarah Mildred, born 1863, died1940; and John Abraham, born Sept. 26, 1863, married Mary Clements (1864 -1948).

E. Humphrey Sparks, son of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probably born
about 1784. We have found no record of him other than the sources given above.

F. Mary “Polly” Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probably born about 1786 in Virginia. She married Anthony Sparks, probably about 1805. He was born on January 7, 1781, in Virginia and was a son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks, and was thus a first cousin to Polly. (See the December 1960 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 32, for further details about the family of Henry and Lucy Sparks.) Polly Sparks died in March 1843. Anthony continued to live in their home (he was by himself when the1850 census was taken of Owen County) until about 1856 when he accompanied his son, Henry, and Henry’s family to Clinton County, Missouri. He died at St. Joseph, Missouri, in the fall of 1865. He and Polly had ten children.

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
-2278-

HUMPHREY SPARKS (ca.1749-ca.1827), continued:

Children of Anthony and Mary “Polly” (Sparks) Sparks:
1. Isabelle “Ibby” Sparks was born about 1806. On Jan. 8, 1827, she married Lewis Smither in Owen County.

2. Mildred “Milly” Sparks was bornon Aug. 8, 1808. She married John Wesley Smither on Jan. 5, 1829, and they had nine children: Noel (probably Nalle), Isabella, Anthony, John, Mary, Thomas, George,Victory, and Russell.

3. Henry Sparks was born on June 28, 1810. He died on Dec. 31, 1884, in Clay County, Missouri. He married Sarah “Sally” Smither on Dec. 21, 1831, in Owen County, Kentucky. They had six children: Louisa, William Anthony, Julia, Georgiana, Adelbert, and Mary.

4. Humphrey Sparks was born about 1812. On March 24, 1836, he married Eliza Ann Calvert in Franklin County, Kentucky. They went to housekeeping in Henry County, Kentucky, and spent the rest of their lives there. They had four children: Thomas Anthony, Permelia, Mary Isabelle, and Martha Ann.

5. Lucy Sparks was born about 1814. She married Dr. Robert J. Hill on March 16, 1837, in Owen County.

6. Milton Sparks was born about 1817. He married Sarah “Sally” Spires, probably about 1838. Milton was drowned in the Kentucky River about 1841. He and Sally had two children: Mary and John Milton.

7. Clifton Sparks was born on August 18, 1818. He died on April 25, 1848. He married Nancy Lawler on February 3, 1842, and they had three children: Jessie, George, and John.

8. Martha Sparks was born about 1821. On October 2, 1837, she married Jesse P. Hill in Owen County, Kentucky.

9. Thomas Sparks was born about 1824. He is said to have married Eliza Quinn.

10. Mary Sparks was born about 1826. On July 8, 1848, she married William H. Smith in Owen County, Kentucky.

G. Peachie Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probably born about 1788 in Virginia. She married John Kilbey, probably about 1809. He was born on September 19, 1780 in Virginia, and he may have been a son of James and Lucy (Sparks) Kilbey. (See page 137 of the June 1956 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 14.) Peachie apparently died between 184o and 1850. John died in September 1858, at St. Joseph, Missouri. He and Peachie had four children:
1. Lucy B. Kilbey was born in June 1811.

2. Mildred A. Kilbey was born on May 4, 1813.

3. Frances Ellen Kilbey was born on August 17, 1817.

4. James Martin Kilbey was born on February 29, 1825. He died on May 31, 1870, at St. Joseph, Missouri. He married Ann Elizabeth Corum on January 22, 1856.

H. Isabella Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probably
born about 1790 in Virginia. She married Johnson Ballard, probably about 1814. He was born about 1770 and this was his second marriage. His first marriage was to Bettie Eastham in 1791 in Culpeper County, Virginia. He died prior to 1845, while Isabella died after 1845, according to the deposition mentioned above. Isabella and Johnson Ballard had four children.
1. Mildred Ballard was born probably about 1815. She married Moses Harrod in Owen County, Kentucky, in 1835. They moved to Missouri.

2. Frances “Fanny” Ballard.

3. B----- Ballard. His given name may have been Bland.

4. Johnson Ballard, Jr.

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
-2279-
HUMPHREY SPARKS (ca .1749-ca.1827), continued:
I. Susan Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probablyborn about 1792. She married Charles Palmer, probably about 1813, and theyhad two children. Susan and Charles Palmer died prior to 1845.
1. Towles Palmer.

2. Sarah “Sally” Palmer. She married R. F. Oliver on Dec. 11, 1847, in Owen County, Kentucky.

J. Fanny Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probably
born about 1794. (Her name may have been Frances and her nickname was Fanny.) She married Madison Sparks in Woodford County, Kentucky, on February 11, 1818. Her father was named on the marriage record. Madison Sparks was born on August 10, 1795, in Culpeper County, Virginia, and was a son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks, thus he and Fanny were first cousins. (See pages 634-635 of the March 1962 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 37, for an abstract of the bounty land application made by Madison Sparks for service in the War of 1812.) Fanny Sparks died sometime after 1820; there were no children born to this marriage. After her death, Madison Sparks married Mrs. Winifred (Thomas) Stafford in 1827, by whom he had nine children.

K. Mariah Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probably born about 1796. On October 17, 1831, she married Thomas Jameson Sparks in Owen County, Kentucky. He was born on October 10, 1804, in Virginia, and was a son of Robert and Isabelle (Ford) Sparks. (See the June 1967 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 58, for further details regarding this family.) Mariah died on March 24, 1855, in Henry County, Kentucky. Her father, Humphrey Sparks, was named on the record of her death. After her death,Thomas Sparks married Mildred Sparks, daughter of Martin and Caty (Middleton) Sparks. (See D, 5, above.)

L. Hilly Sparks, daughter of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, was probably born about 1798. She was probably the Hilly Sparks, Jr. who was dismissed from the Forks of Elkhorn Church in 1818, after the family had moved to Franklin County. We have found no further records of her and she may have died while still a young woman. She apparently never married.

(A further note from the Editor: As can be seen from the information that we have given above regarding the family of Humphrey and Milly (Nalle) Sparks, there are many gaps and there are many dates on which it has been necessary to speculate. We are confident that there are descendants among our readers who have records pertaining to this family, including, perhaps, old photographs and letters. We would welcome any additional information that you could provide for us.)

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *
SAMUEL SPARKS OF PIATT COUNTY, ILLINOIS

A book entitled The Good Life in Piatt County, a History of Piatt County, llinois published in l968 and edited by Jessie Borror Morgan, states that when the county was organized in 1841, there were about 700 people living there. On page 163 it is stated: “The Methodist Episcopal Church of Bement was the first in the village. It was formerly organized in 1858 under the pastorate of Edward Rutledge,with meetings held in the schoolhouse in Bryant’s Hall. It was known as the M.E.Society, and its services were attended by most of the people of the community until the Christian Church was formed in 1862. The first trustees were: J. H.Taylor, William Parker, Willian Stillwell, James McDowell, Elias Baldwin,Thomas Postlewait, SAMUEL SPARKS, and C. D. Moore.” Can anyone identify this Samuel Sparks?

***************
-2280-

UNION SOLDIERS NAMED SPARKS WHO APPLIED, OR WHOSE HEIRS APPLIED, FOR

PENSIONS FOR SERVICE IN THE CIVIL WAR

(Editor’s Note: From time to time we have been publishing abstracts of the pension files of Union soldiers who served in the Civil War. Readers are referred to page 2110 of the June 1979 issue of the QUARTERLY, Whole No. 106, for an explanation of these abstracts. It should be noted that they are not based on the entire file of papers in the National Archives, but are based on only those documents considered by a searcher at the Archives to have genealogical significance.)
 
 
  PETER SPARKS son of Daniel and Mildred (Admire) (Anders) Sparks, was born on May 10, 1839, in Putnam County, Missouri. He married (1st) Elizabeth E. Corneilson on Sept. 15, 1859, and (2d) Sarah F. Vestal on Nov.16,1865. He served in Company B, 11th Regiment Missouri State Militia Cavalry. File Designations: Inv. Cert. No. 540,121; Wid. Sort. No. 722,050.

[Scanner's note:  For correction see SQ p. 3959.]

On June 17, 1889, Peter Sparks, aged 50, a resident of Graysville, Missouri,made application for an invalid pension. He said he was enrolled on April 1,1862, in Company B, 11th Regiment Missouri State Militia Cavalry and had served until he was discharg-  ed in April 1865 at St. Louis, Mo. In February 1865, while driving a wagon drawl by mules near Bloomfield, Mo., he had been swamped down in icy water from which he had to wade. The exposure to the icy water led to partial deafness and rheumatism from which he had never fully recovered and which now rendered him incapable of earning his full support as a farmer. He appointed Lee T. Robison, of Unionville, Mo., as his attorney.  P. T. Dickerson and T. E. Sparks witnessed his signature. Sparks’s application was accompanied by an affidavit from two former comrades, Francis H. West, Mendota, Missouri, and James H. Richmond, Graysville, Missouri, who testified that they, too, had been members of Sparks’s military company and that in February 1865 he had been attacked by a disease that caused severe pains in the arms and shoulders and which caused a partial deafness from which he had never fully recover-  ed.

On March 4, 1891, the Bureau of Pensions issued Invalid Certificate No. 540,121 to Peter Sparks and he was placed upon the pension rolls at the rate of $12.00 per month.

Sparks responded to a questionnaire from the Bureau of Pensions on May 3, 1898. He stated that he had been married to Sarah Frances Vestal on October 15, 1865, in Putnam County, ML souri, by John Collins. Prior to this marriage, he was married to Elizabeth F. Corneilson on September 15, 1859. She had died on August 24, 1864. Children born to these marriages were:
 
John Sparks born On July 30, 1860  Charlotte Sparks born on Feb. 20, 1875
Mahala Sparks born on Aug. 20, 1862  Daniel Sparks born Dec. 20, 1877
Lucinda Sparks born on Nov. 9, 1866  Aaron Sparks born Jan. 21, 1882
Millie G. Sparks born Oct. 17, 1867  Fina Edith Sparks born on Nov. 30,1885
William H. Sparks born on Oct. 17, 1869  Rebecca Sparks, born on Dec. 11, 1873
James D. Sparks born on July 17, 1872 Minnie Sparks born on Aug. 20, 1891
 Frederick Sparks born on Aug. 16, 1889

On July 15, 1901, the Bureau of Pensions requested the War Department to furnish a full military record of Peter Sparks, including his age at the time of his enlistment. The War Department responded that Peter Sparks, aged 22 years, had enlisted as a mounted rifleman in Company B, Missouri State Militia which became

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-2281-

PETER SPARKS, CIVIL WAR PENSION APPLICATION, continued:

Company B, 11th Regt. and Companies A & M, 2nd Regt. Missouri State Militia. Sparks was present for duty except on two occasions: on April 10, 1863, he was on special muster on mail service, and on October 31, 1863, he was on scout duty.

On February 13, 1903, Talton E. Sparks and Jesse Richmond, both residents of Graysville, Missouri, made a joint affidavit to support the request for an increase in the amount of Peter Sparks’s pension. They said they were neighbors of Sparks and that he continually complained about his deafness and rheumatism.

On February 27, 1907, Peter Sparks, now a resident of Mapleton, Missouri, applied for increased pension benefits under the 1907 Act of Congress. He said that he had enlisted on April 1, 1862, in Company A, 2nd Regt. Missouri State Militia and had served until he was discharged on April 4, 1865, at St. Louis. At the time of his enlistment, he was 5 feet, 10 inches tall; he had a light complexion, blue eyes and light hair; and he was a farmer. He stated that he had been born in Putnam County, Missouri, on May 10, 1839. T. W. Dwyer and W. C. Francis, both residents of Graysville, Missouri, witnessed the application which was sworn to before J. L. Casady, a notary public.

When Peter Sparks died on February 28, 1911, he was receiving a pension of $15 per month. On March 22, 1911, his widow, Sarah F. Sparks, aged 62 years and a resident of Worthington, Missouri, made application for a widow’s pension. She said she was married to Peter Sparks on October 15, 1865, by John Collins in Putnam County, Missouri. It was her first marriage, but her husband had been married previously to Elizabeth Ellen Corneilson, who had died on August 24,1864. C. E. Husted and Dock Mulanix, both residents of Worthington, witnessed her make her mark, and the application was sworn to before Frank J. Bragg, a notary public.

When Sarah F. Sparks died at Kirksville, Missouri, on September 8, 1927, she was receiving a pension of $30.00 per month. She was buried in the Rose Cemetery near Worthington. On November 26, 1927, her daughter, Fina Edith (Sparks) Monroe, asked for reimbursement for expenses incurred in the last illness of her mother. She said Davis & Wilson, undertakers, were still owed $120.00; Dr. F. B. Farrington was due $57.00, and she (Fina Honroe) was due $64.00 for nursing care. Nothing was provided from the pension file to indicate what action was taken upon this request.

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  JOHN SPARKS son of Daniel and Mildred (Admire) (Anders) Sparks, was born about 1832 in Indiana. He died on Dec. 26, 1891, at Tahlequah, Indian Territory. He married Mary Jane West on September 2, 1855, in Putnam County,Missouri. He served in Company A, 1st Regiment Arkansas Cavalry. File Designations: Inv. Appl. No. 400,232; Wid. Cert. No. 364,065.

[Scanner's note:  For correction see SQ p. 3959.]

John Sparks applied for an invalid pension on June 22, 1880. He was 49 years of age and a resident of McDowell, Barry County, Missouri. He claimed that he entered the service in Company A, 1st Regiment Arkansas Cavalry, commanded by Capt.Joshua Dudley, On June 22, 1862, and served until he was mustered out on August 22, 1865, at Fayetteville, Arkansas. He said he was then 5 feet, 10 inches tall; with a fair complexion, blue eyes and dark hair; and he was a farmer. On or about December 15, 1862, while stationed near Fort Smith, Arkansas, he was captured by the enemy. He then contracted a disease of the blood brought on by eating rations furnished by his captors. He also had suffered a back and hip injury while taking part in a battle charge in 1864. He appointed George E.Lemon, Washington, D.C., as his attorney. George W. Kirk and William L. Hutchens witnessed his signature.

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-2282-

JOHN SPARKS, CIVIL WAR PENSION APPLICATION, continued:

Apparently the Bureau of Pensions asked for further details about Sparks’s disabilities, for about 1882 he filed a supplemental report. He said that after his capture on or about December 18, 1862, in Crawford County, Arkansas, he and his comrades were taken to Cane Hill, Arkansas, and on the way, they were given rations in the form of crackers. After eating, he became unconscious and small sores began to appear on his body. These sores formed hard scabs which, when removed, left a hard sub-   stance. The effect was to produce tremors and great exhaustion and failure of strength. He was treated by the Regimental Surgeon, Dr.H. J. Maynard, from December 20, 1862, to April 18, 1863.

The War Department confirmed Sparks’s service on February 27, 1883. He was en- rolled on June 22, 1862, in Crawford County, Arkansas, for a period of three years. On December 12, 1862, he was taken a prisoner near Prairie Grove, Ark., but he was paroled and he returned to duty. He was present for duty unti lAugust 23, 1865, when he was mustered out with his company at Fayetteville, Ark. His name did not appear on Prisoner-of-War records, nor were they any records of disabilities; however, the regimental hospital records were not on file.

John Sparks’s first application was not approved, and on July 29, 1890, he again made a request for a disability pension. He was now age 57 and a resident of Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma). He said he was still suffering from the injuries caused by a horse falling on him about November 20, 1864, near Buffalo Creek, Searcy County, Arkansas. Eli V. Wells andJames Leap witnessed his signature. This application was not approved.

John Sparks died on December 26, 1891, in Tahlequah and his widow, Mary J.Sparks, age 54, made application for a widow’s pension under the 1890 Act of Congress. She said she and John Sparks had been married in Putnam County, Missouri, on September 2, 1855, by Clay Collins. It was the first marriage for both and she was married under her maiden name of Mary Jane West. There was only one child born to the mar- riage who was under sixteen years of age, named, Grant Sparks, born September 20, 1879, a confirmed invalid. She appointed John L. Springston, Tahlequah, as her attorney. Joseph Heinicks and Edward Conley witnessed her make her mark.

On April 26, 1892, James Leap, age 42, and Joe Heinricks, age 42, both residents of Tahlequah, testified that Mary J. Sparks owned no property and had no income except that which came to her from her daily labor. A few days later, Margaret Rowen, age 55, and Martha A. Truhitte, age 65, both residents of Butterfield, Barry County, Missouri, stated that they had known John and Mary J. Sparks for forty years and that they were present when the two had been married, and knew it to be the first marriage for both. A. Rowan and S. E. Depew witnessed the two women make their marks.

On June 28, 1892, Mary J. Sparks amended her original application by changing the date of birth of her son, Grant Sparks, to September 21, 1874. C. J. Harris and Robert Wofford witnessed her make her mark.

Mary J. Sparks was issued a pension under Widow’s Certificate No. 364,065. On Feb- ruary 28, 1902, the pension agent at Topeka, Kansas, advised the Bureau of Pensions that she had been dropped from the pension rolls because of “failure to claim pension for three years.”

- - - - - - - - - - - - -


 JOHN C. SPARKS son of James I. and Elizabeth (Ferguson) Sparks, was born about 1843 in Indiana. He died on February 17, 1883, in ShawneeCounty, Kansas. On April 20, 1865, he married Susan Jane DiThsin Putnam County, Missouri. He served in Company C, 2nd Regiment Missouri S. H. Cavalry. File designation: Wid. Cert. No. 496 ,434.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
-2283-

JOHN C. SPARKS, CIVIL WAR PENSION APPLICATION, continued:

On August 11, 1890, Susan J. Sparks, aged 44, a resident of Bradleyville, Missouri, applied for a widow’s pension under the 1890 Act of Congress. She said she had previously applied for a pension under Application No. 392,531. She stated that she was the widow of John C. Sparks who had enlisted on March 10,1862, in Company C, 2nd Regiment Missouri State Militia. She was married to John C. Sparks on April 20, 1865, under her maiden name of Susan J. Dilks. Her husband had died on February 17, 1883, leaving her with no other means than her daily labor. He also left her with three children under 16 years of age, namely: Sarah J. Sparks, born on June 30, 1876; Everett J. C. Sparks, born on July 7,1879; and Myrtle Sparks, born on August 22, 1881. Susan Sparks appointed J. C.Johnson of Bradleyville, Missouri, as her attorney. S. P. Paul and J. M. Adams witnessed her make her mark.

Susan Sparks had filed an application on April 5, 1877, but no copy of this application was supplied by the National Archives. On May 20, 1889, the Bureau of Pensions asked the War Department to furnish the military records of John C.Sparks. The War Department responded on August 3, 1889, indicating that Sparks had been enrolled on March 10, 1862, at Lancaster, Missouri, in Company E, 2nd Regiment Missouri S. M. Cavalry. He was transferred to Company C in September 1862. In September and October 1863, he was reported as “absent on scout.” He was present for duty until he was mustered out with his company on March 21,1865, at St. Louis, Missouri.

On February 12, 1891, Mary E. Coy, aged 45, a resident of Kissee Mills, Missouri, testified that she had been present as a neighbor when Susan J. Sparks gave birth to Laura B. Sparks on December 7, 1870.

On August 24, 1899, Preston Johnson and J. B. Johnson, both of whom were res-       dents of Swan, Missouri, swore that Susan J. Dilkes and John C. Sparks had been married in the month of April, 1865. They also swore that neither Susan nor John had been married before, and that Susan had not remarried after the death of her husband. They stated that Susan and John Sparks had had seven children and that an affidavit containing their names and dates of birth had already been filed with the Bureau of Pensions.

A month later, on September 29, 1899, William A. Shelton, Clerk of Putnam County, Missouri, sent a copy of the marriage record of John Sparks and Susan Dilks. They were married on April 20, 1865, by Daniel Sparks, a justice of the peace in Putam County, Missouri.

On October 7, 1898, Hiram Lawson, aged 44, and William Woods, aged 63, both residents of Taneyville, Missouri, testified that they were close neighbors of Susan Sparks and knew that she was in poor financial condition. She owned no real estate and her personal property would not amount to $20. She had no income except that which she worked for, and owing to the failure of her eyesight, she was not able to do much work.

Susan Sparks made an affidavit on December 8, 1899, to support her application. She was now a resident of Wattsville, Missouri. She stated that she owned no real estate, and that her personal property consisted of a cow, worth $25, and a few household articles, such as a stove, two beds and bedding, and wearing apparel, worth no more than $25. Her income since 1890 had not exceeded one dollar per month, and during all that time there had been no one legally bound to provide her support.

A few days later, Susan Sparks appeared before a notary public to make another affi-  davit. She stated that she and her late husband, John C. Sparks, had had three child-   ren who were under the age of sixteen years when her husband died on February 17, 1883, in Shawnee County, Kansas. They were: Sarah Jane Sparks,

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-2284-

JOHN C. SPARKS, CIVIL WAR PENSION APPLICATION, continued:

born in Putnam County, Missouri, on June 30, 1877; Everett Craben (?) Sparks,born in Shawnee County, Kansas, on July 7, 1879; and Myrtle Sparks, born in Shawnee Coun- ty, Kansas, on August 22, 1881.

A few days later, Susan Sparks appeared before a notary public of Taney County, Missouri. She stated that she was unable to furnish any further evidence of the dates of birth of her children other than that which she had already given, and that if her evidence was not deemed sufficient, she wanted to waive that part of her claim which was made on account of her minor children. H. A. Dickenson and C. H. Elliott Witnessed her make her mark.

Widow Certificate No. 496,434 was issued to Susan J. Sparks and she was finally placed upon the pension roll. When she died on March 26, 1906, she was receiving a pension of $8.00 per month.
 
 
  WILLIAM C. SPARKS, son of William and Nancy (Crawford) Sparks, was born on July 20, 1838, in Johnson County, Indiana. He married Miranda Whitaker there on May 31, 1859. He served in Companies A & C, 7th Regiment Indiana Cavalry. File Designation: Inv. Appl. No. 774,399.

William C. Sparks made an application for an invalid pension on May 3, 1890. He was 52 years of age and a resident of Schuyler County, Missouri. He stated that he had enrolled on August 5, 1862, in Company A, 7th Regiment Indiana Cavalry commanded by Capt. Parmilee, and was discharged in March 1864 at Canton, Tennessee. He was 5 feet, 6 1/4 inches tall; he had a light complexion, light hair and blue eyes; and he was a farmer. While he was a prisoner of war at Canton, Tenn.,in March 1863, he was struck in the right eye by a comrade snapping on an old coup (?) and a piece flying into his eye. The injury eventually destroyed his sight in that eye. He was treated in the Rebel Hospital at Canton, Tennessee. F. I. Millinger and S. S. Millinger witnessed his signature.

Upon receipt of the pension application of William C. Sparks, the Bureau of Pensions requested the War Department to furnish a record of his military service. The Department complied and sent several records including the Company’s Muster-In Roll, Company Descriptive Book, Company Muster Roll, Company Roll ofHen Transferred, Memorandum from Prisoner of War Records, Discharge Certificate,and two Travel Requisitions.

William C. Sparks was enrolled in Company A, 7th Regiment Indiana Cavalry on August 5, 1863, at Indianapolis to serve for three years. He was paid a bounty of $25. He was present for duty on the Company Muster Roll until January - February 1864 when a notation was entered “Missing on the march since Jan. 7,1864.” He was carried on the Muster Roll with that same notation until January-February 1865, when the notation was changed to “Captured near Paris, Tenn.,Jan. 7, 1864.” The Company Muster-out Roll, dated February 18, 1866, at Austin,Texas, contained the following notation: “Joined as recruit in Co. A as within stated. Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 19, 1865.” The Company Descriptive Book carried the notation: “Taken prisoner Jan. 7, 1864 near Paris, Tenn. Nothing has been heard of him since, and it is supposed that he died in Southern prison.”

One of the most puzzling documents sent from the military file of William C.Sparks is a Certificate of Discharge issued at Austin, Texas, by Capt. Joseph W. Skelton, Company Commander. Capt. Skelton certified that Sparks was a member of Company C, 7th Regiment Indiana Cavalry. He was 25 years of age; he vias 5 feet, 6 1/2 inches tall; he had a light complexion, light hair and blue eyes, and he was a farmer. He was born in Johnson County, Indiana. He was mustered into the

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-2285-

WILLIAM C. SPARKS, CIVIL WAR PENSION APPLICATION, continued:

service at Indianapolis on Aug. 5, 1863. He served with his company in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi and was taken prisoner at Paris, Tennessee, on January 7, 1864, and since That time nothing has been heard from him. The Certificate was dated November 12, 1863.

There were two Travel Requisitions in the military file for William C. Sparks. One of these, dated January 19, 1864, was for his travel from Cairo (Illinois ?) to Columbus, Kentucky, as an “Exchanged Prisoner en route for Regt.” The other requisition was dated in July 1864 and authorized the Jeffersonville Rail Road to transport Sparks from Columbus, Indiana, to Indianapolis. Sparks was described as a “Private, Co. A, 7th Regt. Indian Cavalry. Deserter.”

The remaining records: in Sparks’s military file consisted of an order, dated June 22, 1864, from Col. Conrad Baker, Provost Marshal, Indianapolis, to Capt. S.Stansifer, Provost Marshal, directing him to apprehend William C. Sparks, a deserter from the 7th Regt. Indiana Calvalry, who was reported to be in Hamblen Township, Brown County, Indiana. Sparks was apprehended on July 11, 1864, near Spearsville, Indiana, and sent to Indianapolis.

The Bureau of Pensions requested Sparks to appear before a Board of Examiners for a physical examinaton on January 21, 1891. The Board found him to be suffering from sciatica and he was totally blind in his right eye. They recommended a twelve-fifteenth disability rating.

Apparently the Bureau of Pensions determined that Sparks was not eligible for an invalid pension, for on August 29, 1891, and again on September 5, 1898, Sparks reapplied for a pension. To the latter application, the Record Office of the War Department sent the Bureau of Pensions the following memorandum: “William C. Sparks, Co. A, 7th Regt. Indiana Cavalry, appears on a Descriptive List of Deserters Arrested, dated July 11, 1864, with the following remarks: ‘Arrested near Spearsville, Brown Co., Ind., July 10, 1864, and delivered to this office this day. Arrested in compliance with orders from Col. Conrad Baker, dated Indianapolis, June 22, 1864. This man has a paper purporting to be a Parole setting forth that he was taken prisoner on Jan. 8, 1864. The reward of $30.00 for his arrest & delivery allowed. Escaped enroute to Mil. Station, Indpls.”’

On June 22, 1899, the Commissioner of the Bureau of Pensions reviewed the case of William C. Sparks and wrote the following statement to Attorney J. P. Line, Quincey, Illinois: “The above entitled claim for pension rejected on the ground of no title.  Claimant deserted from the above named organization as shown by the records of the War Department and has never been discharged therefrom.”

On April 30, 1907, K. C. Sparks, aged 66, a resident of Chautauqua County,Kansas, applied for a pension under the 1907 Act of Congress. He stated that he was born in Johnson County, Indiana, on July 20, 1838. He enrolled in Company A, 7th Regiment Indiana Cavalry in October 1864 and was discharged at Union City, Tennessee, in February 1865. Since leaving the service he had lived in Johnson County, Indiana, until 1871; in Putnam County, Missouri, until 1894; in Marion County, Arkansas, until 1896; in Kay County, Oklahoma, until 1897, and in Chautauqua County, Kansas, until the present. He said his discharge papers had burned along with his household, and the dates he had given were from memory. Irven Lonnsburg and G. A. Brooks witnessed his signature.

The last applicatios for an invalid pension was made by William C. Sparks on October 24, 1916. he was now 77 years of age, and a resident of Fort Dodge,Kansas. He was evidently quite feeble, for William McGovern and Thomas Carrigy witnessed him affix his mark - - until this time he had always signed his name.

Four days later, Congressman Jouett Shouse, Kinsley, Kansas, wrote to the Commissioner of Pensions and asked what further evidence was required to give

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
-2286-

WILLIAN C. SPARKS, CIVIL WAR PENSION APPLICATION, continued:

prompt consideration to the pension application of William S. Sparks of Fort Dodge, Kansas. Sparks had written to Congressman Shouse as follows: "After I was paroled from prison, I was so weak and feeble, not able to get around much, and I had no money, not having been paid for my services. I was not able to travel over the country to find my Company or Regiment, but I learned shortly afterward that they had been mustered out and that is the reason that I have no discharge."

Apparently no further action was ever taken on the application of William C.Sparks. No Certificate was ever issued to him for a pension.

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 JAMES SPARKS, son of William and Nancy (Crawford) Sparks, was born on March 20, 1831, in Johnson County, Indiana. He married Elizabeth Richmond on January 16, 1850, in Johnson County. He served in Company D, 82nd Regiment Indiana Infantry. File Designation: Inv. Cert.No. 955,377.

On August 14, 1897, James Sparks, aged 66, a resident of Powesheik County, Iowa, made application for an invalid pension. He said he had enrolled on July 27,1863, in Company D, 82nd Regiment Indiana Infantry at Indianapolis, Indiana,and had served until he was discharged at Burnt Hickory, Georgia, on May 30,1864. He was now unable to earn a support by reason of rheumatism of the shoulders and arms, and he was troubled with deafness, poor vision and piles. He appointed George H. Onthank, Grinnell, Iowa, as his attorney. L. P. Harison and Saml. Nelson witnessed his signature.

The War Department confirmed Sparks’s military service as he had stated it to be, and a physical examination showed that he suffered from rheumatism and a disease of the rectum. A pension of $6.00 per month was approved and the Bureau of Pensions issued Sparks Invalid Certificate No. 955,377.

Sparks answered a questionnaire from the Bureau of Pensions on July 4, 1898. He stated that he had been married to Elizabeth Richmond on January 16, 1850, in Johnson County, Indiana, by Morgan Pitcher, a justice of the peace. It was the first marriage for both. They had nine children.
 
Fanny Sparks, born July 5, 1850  Luanna Sparks, born February 21, 1857
Abigail Sparks, born July 20, 1851  Andrew Sparks, born April 21, 1858
Edward Sparks, born September 28, 1852  William Sparks, born October 18, 1859
Barton Sparks, born December 5, 1855 Crawford Sparks, born June 22, 1866
Catherine Sparks, born April 22, 1869

On March 22, 1907, James Sparks applied for increased pension benefits under the 1907 Act of Congress. He stated that he was 5 feet, 6 inches tall; he had a light complexion, dark hair and dark eyes; and he was a farmer. He was born on March 20, 1831, in Johnson County, Indiana, although his discharge papers stated that he was born in Brown County, Indiana. After leaving the service he returned to Johnson County where he stayed until 1870, and then he moved to Powesheik County, Iowa, where he had lived since. E. H. Bump and C. N. Dawley witnessed his signature and the declara- tion was sworn to before H. Chafee, a notary public. The application was approved, and Sparks’s pension was increased to $20 per month.

Again, on June 18, 1912, Sparks applied for increased pension benefits. He gave his address as R.F.D. 1, Grinnell, Iowa.  J. H. Patten and H. J. Patrick witnessed his signature. The application was approved and the pension was increased to $22.50 per month. When he died, on January 19, 1921, he was receiving a pension of $50.00 per month.

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-2287-


 
 
TALTON EMERSON SPARKS son of John and Delila Ann (Demar) Sparks, was born on August 12, 1840, in Brown County, Indiana. He married Susan Hogg on March 17, 1861, in Putnam County, Missouri. He served in Company D, 1st Regiment Missouri State Militia Cavalry. File Designation: Inv. Cert. No.70,455.

Talton E. Sparks was issued a Certificate of Disability for Discharge on April 10,1865, at Warrensburg, Missouri. According to the certificate, he had enlisted in Company D, 1st Regiment Missouri State Militia Cavalry, commanded by Capt. John Wyckoff, on June 5, 1862, at Unionville, Mo., to serve for three years. He was 22 years of age; 5 feet 6 inches tall; he had a light complexion, dark eyes and black hair; and he was a farmer. He was now unfit for duty because he had been shot through the left lung on October 25, 1864, at the Battle of Mine Creek while making a charge on the enemy.

A. W. Rose, Surgeon in Charge of the Post Hospital at Warrensburg, said the shot entered Sparks’s chest between the 7th and 8th ribs, passing through the lung and emerging near the 10th dorsal vertebra. Sparks was continuing to run a hectic fever and expectorating pus which rendered him unfit for the service; however, he was predicted to recover and would probably be able to follow some light occupation. The certificate was signed by Lt. Charles T. Triplett, Company Commander, and was approved by Maj. Murline C. Wenslee (?), Post Commander.

Talton Sparks apparently applied for an invalid pension in the early part of 1866, for on April 28th of that year, the Adjutant General confirmed his military service to theBureau of Pensions. The record followed the same statements made on the Certificate of Disability Discharge. Sparks was released from the service because of wounds received in the Battle of Osage on October 25,1864. The Bureau of Pensions issued Sparks Invalid Certificate No. 70,455 andhe was placed upon the pension rolls at the rate of $4.00 per month.

On July 28, 1870, Sparks asked for his case to be reviewed for a pension increase. He said his lung injury had never healed and that he continued to cough up bloody pus in such quantities that he was unable to perform manual labor without great pain and danger. Frequently, he was unable to leave his bed for several days at a time. He gave his address as Martinstown, Missouri. Charles T. Triplett and Richard M. Brasfield witnessed his signature and also swore that they agreed with his request since they were former comrades, serving in the same company with him. The application was sworn to before Milton Canby, Clerk of Putnam County Circuit Court.

Sparks asked for a pension increase on May 1, 1885. He was now receiving a pension of $12 per month, but he said that his physical condition was getting worse and he now needed someone to take care of him. The request was notarized by Neal Martin, a notary public.

On two other occasions, Sparks offered evidence in the form of affidavits to support his claim to increased pension benefits. On July 5, 1892, J. M. Corneilson and J. A. Robbins, residents of Graysville, Missouri, stated that they  “knew him to Bee intirly disabel to perform manuel laber and is spiting blood more or less all the time.” On September 15, 1897, James Hurley and G. F.Schuster, also residents of Graysville, gave about the same kind of testimony. G. W. Hogg and Lon Hogg witnessed their signatures.

Sparks responded to a questionnaire from the Bureau of Pensions on April 24,1916. He said he was born in Brown County, Indiana, on April 24, 1840. He was married to Susan Hogg on March 10, 1861, in Putnam County, Missouri, by John Furgason. It was the first and only marriage for both of them. His wife had died on January 23, 1916.  They had five children:

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-2288-

TALTON EMERSON SPARKS, CIVIL WAR PENSION APPLICATION, continued:

(Children of Talton F. and Susan (Hogg) Sparks:

John William Sparks was born on December 23, 1865.
James Thomas Sparks was born on March 21, 1868.
Daniel E. Sparks was born on December 1, 1873, and he died on April 22, 1883.
Ira L. Sparks was born on December 15, 1878, and he died on March 26, 1907.
Pressley Martin Sparks was born on January 24, 1886.
When Talton E. Sparks died at Livonia, Missouri, on August 20, 1917, he was receiving a pension of $30 per month. He was buried in the Hogg Cemetery, Elm Township, Putnam County, Missouri. On November 15th, his son, John W. Sparks, Livonia, Missouri, made application for certain expenses incurred during his father’s last illness. Sparks said that Dr. Ida H. Nulten had been paid fully for her services. Husted Bros. & Shibley, undertakers, were still due $68.90,and J. W. & Ellen Sparks were due $75.00 for providing nursing services. P. M. Sparks had paid $35.00 on the burial.  B. B. Corneilson and Mrs. G. A. Sparks, both of Livonia, witnessed John W. Sparks make his mark. Nothing was sent from the pension file to indicate what action was taken on the application.
 
 
 GEORGE F. SPARKS, son of Daniel and Mildred (Admire) (Anders) Sparks was born about 1841 in Putnam County, Missouri. He died of wounds on October 15, 1864, in Sedalia, Missouri. He served in Company D, 1stRegiment Missouri State Militia Cavalry. He married Margaret J. Vincent on July 28, 1861. File Designation: Widow’s Claim No. 82,253; Certificate 195,487.

[Scanner's note:  For correction see SQ p. 3959.]

 A copy of the complete file of papers pertaining to the pension of Margaret Sparks, widow of George F. Sparks, has been obtained from the National Archives.

On January 24, 1865, Margaret Sparks, aged 19 years, a resident of Independence, Jackson County, Misseuri, appeared before the clerk of the county court, John R. Sweasinger (?) to apply for a Civil War pension under an Act of Congress dated July 14, 1862. She stated that she was the widow of George Sparks who had been a private in Company D, commanded by Captain John Wycoff in the 1st Regiment of Missouri State Militia Cavalry Volunteers, and that he had died of wounds on October 15, 1864, at Sedalia, Missouri. She further stated that she had been married to George Sparks on July 28, 1861, in Putnam County, Missouri, but that there had been no children. She signed her name as “Margaret Sparks.” The witnesses to her application were William Williams and David Cornelision, both of Independence. Both of these men stated that they had known Margaret for the past ten or twelve years and that they had known George Sparks for five or six years in Putnam County. They added that they had both been present and saw said George Sparks and Margaret Vincent married and that they afterwards lived and cohabited together as husband and wife and all the neighbors regarded them as husband and wife. William Williams signed his name but David Cornelision signed by mark.

A document appears in this file from the U.S. Adjutant General’s office stating that a record had been found that George Sparks had been “Killed in action at Sedalia, Mo., Oct. 15, 1864.”

The next item in this file, dated March 9, 1880, reveals that Margaret Sparks had not received a pension following her 1865 application and that her attorneys, Bates & Clark of St. Louis, who filed the claim for her, had “abandoned the prosecution of same.” On March 9, 1880, power of attorney was given to Milo P.Stevens & Co. of Chicago to try to collect her pension for her. Her problem seems to have been caused in part by her remarriage on October 29, 1865, to Asa Callehan and the fact that she had no record of her marriage to George Sparks.

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-2289-

GEORGE F. SPARKS, CIVIL WAR PENSION APPLICATION, continued:

On December 16, 1880, Peter Greggers, recorder for the Circuit Court of Putnam County, Missouri, provided proof that a justice of the peace named Othenial Bacus had married Ceorge F. Sparks and Margaret J. Vincent on July 28, 1861, in Putnam County. AlsO contained in this file is a statement signed on January 17,1881, by Peter Greggers that Margaret J. Sparks, widow of George, had been married on October ?9, 1865, to Asa Callehan by a minister named Win. P. Shanklin.

Also contained in the file is a sworn statement dated December 16, 1880, by David Brown, aged 57, and Archibald Robbins, aged 38, of Mendoto (?), Putnam County, Missouri, that they had known both George Sparks and his wife for twenty years and knew that neither had been married previously and that they lived together as husband and wife.

Also contained in tire file is a letter dated September 22, 1881, by the postmaster of Erin Springs, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) stated that he had known William Williams for five years and that his “reputation for credibility is good, he is an honest man and is worthy of belief.”

The final document in this file is dated April 26, 1882, and is approval for a pension to be paid to “Margaret Sparks (now Callahan)” at the rate of $8.00 per month for the period from October 16, 1864, the day following the death of her husband, George Sparks, to October 29, 1865, the day on which she was married to Asa Callahan.

At the time her pension was approved, in 1882, Margaret Callahan was a resident of Texas Creek, Freemont County, Colorado.

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(Editor’s Note: Each of the Civil War soldiers who was a subject of one of the seven pension papers abstracted in this issue of the QUARTERLY descends from George Sparks (ca.1777-ca.1855) of Estill County, Kentucky, and Brown County, Indiana. An article on the descendants of this George Sparks has been planned for the June 1981 issue of the QUARTERLY. Anyone connected with this branch of the Sparks family is urged to write to President Paul Sparks (155 N. Hite Ave.,Louisville, Ky., 40206) in the very near future.)

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QUERY

The following query is published at the request of Lucille Dale Ponder whose address is given below.

“I am researching my great-great-grandmother, NANCY SPARKS, who was born in 1764 in Armagh, Ireland. Nancy married JOHN LAMB in 1781, whether in Ireland or in America is debatable. My great-grandmother, Mary (Polly) Lamb was born in Pennsylvania about 1793, so they must have been in Pennsylvania before then.

John Lamb, who was born in 1764, died in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, in 1824 and was buried in Lick fun Presbyterian Churchyard near Bellefonte.

NANCY (SPARKS) LAMB then moved on to Alleghany Township, Venango County, Pennsylvania, to live near her son, John Lamb, and my great-grandmother, Mary (Lamb)Dale. She died February 3, 1853, and was buried in Old Concord Cemetery, Pleasantville, Venango County, Pennsylvania. She was 88 or 89 years old at the time of her death. She was shown as 85 on the 1850 census of Pennsylvania.

She is quoted as saying she was the daughter of a Scottish-Irish laird. She was doubtless an Ulster Scot as was the Lamb family who came to America in 1752.

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-2290-

QUERY--NANCY (SPARKS) LAMB, 1764-1853, continued:

Nancy (Sparks) Lamb is supposed to have had a half-brother named Vennor, but whether he was Vennor Sparks or had the surname Vennor, I cannot say.

I would be glad to correspond with anyone researching Sparkses in Ireland or Pennsylvania. My address is:

Lucille Dale Ponder
1603 No. 46th Street, #201
Seattle, WA 98103
* * * * * * * * * * * *

THE FAMILY OF JOSEPH MONROE SPARKS (1855-1911)

In the QUARTERLY of December 1978 (Vol. XXVI, No. 4, Whole No. 104) pp. 2057- 60, we published an obstract of the Civil War pension papers of Coleman Sparks who was born in South Carolina about 1826 and died on June 24, 1863, while in the Union Army. He had married Louisa E. Goings (or Goins) on April 1, 1849, at Calhoun, Georgia. They were living in the 12th Division of Gordon County,Georgia, when the 1850 census was taken. We believe, but have no proof, that Coleman Sparks was closely related to (perhaps a son of) Drury Sparks (born about 1795) who was originally from Union County, South Carolina, and who moved to Gordon County, Georgia, between 1840 and 1850.

A record of the children of Coleman and Louisa E. (Goings) Sparks, taken from their family Bible, was part of the Civil War pension papers that we published,as noted above. One of the children listed was Joseph Monroe Sparks, born October 17, 1855.

Sarah Henderson, Rt. 7, Hester Heights, Russellville, Alabama (35653) has written to us regarding the family of this Joseph Monroe Sparks, who seems to have been known under the middle name Monroe. He married Emma Daily, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Sherryl) Daily, on August 7, 1876. Between 1880 and1900 they moved from Colbert County, Alabama, to Lawrence County in the same state. He died on February 11, 1911, and was buried in Kings Cemetery on Highway 20 in Lawrence County, Alabama. Emma (Daily) Sparks died June 26, 1941.

They had the following children:

1. Isom G. Sparks, born 1877; he died in August 1966. He married Any Yocum who died February 20, 1946. They had children named Jessie, Mary Emma,Louise, and Jack.

2. John Coleman Sparks, born 1880; he died on April 14, 1932. He was married twice, first to Zula ----- who was born in 1884, and second to Lillian Brewer. He had no children.

3. Rhoda Ann Sparks, born 1883. She married James Yocum and had a daughter named Annie May.

4. Leander Alonzo Sparks (twin of Huston) was born March 14, 1886, and died March 26, 1965. He lived at Hillsboro, Lawrence County, Alabama. He married Willie Grace King, born May 3, 1891, daughter of Haney and Sarah (Fike) Hargett. They had the following children: (1) Virginia Lucille Sparks, born Dcc. 5, 1907; (2) Julia B. Sparks, born Oct. 12, 1909; (3)Odell Sparks, born Jan. 15, 1915; (4) L. A. Sparks, born Jan. 17, 1919; (5) William Albert Sparks, born Dec. 5, 1918; (6) John Sparks, born Dec.24, 1920; (7) Willie Pauline Sparks, born March 17, 1923; (8) Tommie Sparks, born March 17, 1927; (9) Betty Sue Sparks, born Aug. 21, 1929; and Jo Ann Sparks, born Aug. 3, 1932.

5. Houston Ferndor Sparks (twin of Leander) was born March 14, 1886, and died May 30, 1955; married Zeda Houston, born Sept. 24, 1889, died Jan. 6, 1958. They had children named Bertie, Lee, Juanita, and Dorothy.

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-2291-

THE MICHAEL REED FAMILY ASSOCIATION

Darryl M. Reed, President of the Michael Reed Family Association, would like to hear from descendants of William Crain Sparks and his first wife, Sarah Reed. An article on a daughter of this union, Martha Ann, who married Isaac Carter Spence, appeared in the December 1980 issue of the QUARTERLY, Vol. XXVIII, No. 4, Whole No. 112, pp. 2250-55.

We believe that William C. Sparks was a son of James and Nancy (“Ann”) Sparks of Franklin County, Georgia. He was born June 14, 1798. Subsequently, he lived in Tennessee (Hardeman County) and later in Texas, in Wheelock, now Robertson County, and later Nacogdoches County. By 1848 he was living in Brazos County where the village of Sparks was named for him. He died on October 10, 1857.

William C. and Sarah (Reed) Sparks had one son and five daughters: (1) Stephen, who died without issue;  (2) Martha Ann who married Isaac Spence;  (3) Nancy who married Alex Spencer, but whether she was his first or second wife is not known; (4) Harriet who also married Alex Spencer, but whether she was his first or second wife is not known;  (5) Sarah who married Hiram Hanover; and (6) Elizabeth who married (1st) Lafayette Bryant and (2nd) Joe Reveal.

Michael Reed, father of Sarah who married William C. Sparks, came with his family to Texas in the early 1830’s as part of Robertson’s Colony.

Descendants of any off these daughters of William Crain Sparks (who had additional children by a second marriage) should write to Darryl M. Reed, President, The Michael Reed Family association, 316 N. 8th, Temple, TX 76501.

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SPARKS MARRIAGES IN PRAIRIE COUNTY, ARKANSAS

From Books C, D and B (1854-1881)

Copied by Margaret Harrison Hubbard

(Editor’s Note: The following marriage records from Prairie County, Arkansas, have been copied for us by Margaret Harrison Hubbard of Hot Springs, Arkansas. She reports: “I have transcribed these records from microfilm and they will be published within the next month as the oldest surviving records of that county... Since Prairie County is one of some 10 or so in Arkansas with two county seats, the next volume will no doubt bring more to surface.” She goes on to indicate that she will send us an additional listing in the future.)
 

SPARKS, DAVID, 24, to Octavia Oliver, 18, Feb. 21, 1867. D-101
SPARKS, JAMES D., 23, to Maggie H. Melton, 24, Dec. 31, 1873. D-415
SPARKS, JOHN H., 19, to Tennessee Douglass, 16, Nov. 16, 1859. C-213
SPARKS, JOHN, 24, to Sarey Elizabeth Martin, 25, Dec. 29, 1864. D-41
SPARKS, J. D., 21, to Miss Margie Ann Mills, 18, June 24, 1876. B-90
SPARKS, J. F., 28, to Miss A. T. Sparks, 25, Dec. 6, 1880. B-503
SPARKS, NATHAN, 21, to Susan Hollifield, 19, Oct. 19, 1869. D-210
SPARKS, RUFUS NEELY, 31, to Martha Goode Minton, 22, Nov. 11, 1869. D-209
SPARKS, SAMUEL, 21, to Mollie E. Griffin, 25, Sept. 4, 1878. B-290
SPARKS, SPENCER MINTON, 23, to Sarah Matilda Hendrix, 20, Oct. 28, 1858.D-164
SPARKS, WILLIAM, 21, to Sarah A. Oliver, 17, Mar. 10, 1864. D-43
Stratton, Robert H., 30, to ALMEDA SPARKS, 16, Apr. 21, 1864. D-43
Hendricks, Andrew J., 19, to AMAMDA SPARKS, 18, Nov. 26, 1868. D-169
Darst(?), James R., to ARMILDA E. SPARKS, 16, Sept. 9, 1880. B-478
Stratton(?), Edward, 30, to COMFORT SPARKS, 18, Jan. 25, 1857. C-91
Hollyfield, W. T., 20, to KEALIE SPARKS, 21, Sept. 3, 1869. D-207
Crossen, Wm. B., to LETTIE M. SPARKS, June 16, 1870. D-251
Eisbel, William, 19, to LUIVENE SPARKS, 17, Apr. 23, 1874. D-432


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-2292-

SPARKS MARRIAGES IN PRAIRIE COUNTY, ARKANSAS, continued:

Horton, Robert P., 22, to MARTHA J. SPARKS, 25, Jan. 9, 1873. D-375
Orrick, Samuel, 23, to MARY A. SPARKS, 20, July 19, 1867. D-110
Wade, George W., 27, to MISS MARY E. SPARKS, 26, Sept. 3, 1876. B-114
Burnds, J. E., 34, to MISS MARY JANE SPARKS, 22, Nov. 26, 1877. B-218
King, Wm. J., to MRS. OCTAVIA SPARKS, Apr. 6, 1870. D-249
Miller, J. M., 47, to MISS SARAH C. SPARKS, 26, July 31, 1879. B-367
Davis, Joshua, 31, to SARAH MATILDA SPARKS, 28, July 18, 1866. D-72
Nowles, Edward, 45, to SUSIE (Julia? ) ANN SPARKS, 32, Mar. 26, 1861. C-281

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

NEW MEMBERS OF THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION

It is a pleasure to report the names and addresses of thirty-seven new members of THE SPARKS FAMILY ASSOCIATION. These Sparks descendants have joined the Association since our last report of new members that appeared in the December 1980 issue of the QUARTERLY.

Patricia M. Allen, 702 N. Citadel Ave., Tucson, Arizona (85710)
Marilyn Bearden, 4417 Sardis Drive, Gainesville, Georgia (30506)
Dorothy A. Bevard, 451 Yates St., Denver, Colorado (80204)
Mrs. Floyd V. Chapman, 1925 Dale St., San Diego, California (92102)
Loretta Clayton, Rt. 5, Box 344, Hartselle, Alabama (35640)
Wendy L. Counsil, 6232 Rosebury, 1W, St. Louis, Missouri (63105)
Iva S. Edmonson, Rt. 5, Colquitt Rd., Albertville, Alabama (35950)
Marjorie A. Fischer, 1007 14th Ave., South, St. Cloud, Minnesota (56301)
Mrs. J. S. Hordaway, 810 N. Butz St., Fort Stockton, Texas (79735)
Dennis W. Hladik, 1713 Buckboard St., Enid, Oklahoma (73701)
Zada Belle Holder, Rt. 3, Box 96, Albertville, Alabama (35950)
Darlene Jones, 3409 S. 186th St., Seattle, Washington (98188)
Alma Lockard, 281 Silver Lane, Eugene, Oregon (97404)
Mrs. Ronald McKillip, Rt. 4, McCook, Nebraska (69001)
Mrs. Paul B. Matheson, 5008 High Crest Rd., Rockford, Illinois (61107)
Violet L. Paquette, 820 S. Sherrill St., Anaheim, California (92804)
Anna Marie Parks, Box 217, Harlem, Montana (59521)
Shirley Sparks Poland, 7417 Bluejay St., Houston, Texas (77075)
Sue Wake Potter, 522 Gilbert St., Owosso, Michigan (48867)
Helen Sparks Powell, P.O. Box 3, Crossett, Arkansas (71635)
O. D. Pugh, Rt. 12, Box 504, Crossville, Tennessee (38555)
Noah P. Richardson, 1212 East Normal St., Kirksville, Missouri (63501)
Marion Sparks Rinard, Star Route 4, Box 66, Everett, Pennsylvania (15537)
Helen Robinson, Box 667, Malta, Montana (59538)
Georgiann Schend, ll54 Wilson Ave., Havre, Montana (59501)
Irene Solum, 1235 Blvd. Ave., Havre, Montana (59501)
Billy Frank Sparks, Rt. 1, Santo, Texas (76472)
Bonham J. Sparks, Jr., 16727 58th Place, W., Lynnwood, Washington (98036)
Dwayne J. Sparks, P.O. Box 118, Niceville, Florida (32578)
Everett L. Sparks, 377 Point of View Dr., Holiday Shores, Edwardsville, Illinois (62025)
George A. Sparks, 2015 Marshall St., Boone, Iowa (50036)
Hunter DeBow Sparks, Rt. 10 - Box T-93, Ft. Myers, Florida (33908)
Jack Page Sparks, R.D. 1, Petersburg, Pennsylvania (16669)
Ralph Sparks, Jr., 1530 Glenwood Ave., Grand Junction, Colorado (81501)
Thomas Sparks, 509 Indiana St., Vallejo, California (94590)
Virginia Sparks Wisely, 219 N.E. Forrest Ct., Pinelake Village, Jensen Beach, Florida (33457)
Linda D. Zapp, 2624 Astro Dr., Indianapolis, Indiana (46229)
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
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Scanned by Joyce Hobbs Sparks
Edited by James J. Sparks